ARISS SSTV Commemorative Activity Coming Soon

In commemoration of our 20th anniversary, the ARISS team is planning to transmit a set of 12 SSTV images that capture the accomplishments of ARISS over that time. While still to be scheduled, we anticipate the SSTV operation to occur around the weekend of July 15. We are planning for at least a 2 day operation, but are working for a potential longer operation. Note that all of this tentative and may change based on crew scheduling and
ISS operations.

Starting with our first meeting in November 1996, our joint operations on Mir, becoming the first operational payload on ISS in November 2000 to our 1103rd school contact (so far), ARISS’ accomplishments have been tremendous. We have touched the lives of many and inspired and educated countless students to pursue science, technology, engineering and math careers.

Please stay tuned as more details on our SSTV event will be communicated in the coming weeks. Please spread the word. And think about how you can get students in your area involved in capturing these images. We would love to hear your stories on how that goes.

73,  Frank KA3HDO

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Frank H. Bauer, KA3HDO
ISS Ham Radio Program Manager & PI
ARISS International Chair
AMSAT V.P. for Human Spaceflight Programs

About ARISS:

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) is a cooperative venture of international amateur radio societies and the space agencies that support the International Space Station (ISS). In the United States, sponsors are the American Radio Relay League (ARRL), the Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation (AMSAT), Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).  The primary goal of ARISS is to promote exploration of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) topics by organizing scheduled contacts via amateur radio between crew members aboard the ISS and students in classrooms or informal education venues.  With the help of experienced amateur radio volunteers, ISS crews speak directly with large audiences in a variety of public forums.  Before and during these radio contacts, students, teachers, parents, and communities learn about space, space technologies, and amateur radio.  For more information, see www.ariss.org,  www.amsat.org, and www.arrl.org.

ARISS-US Kicks Off Major Fundraising Initiative with Challenge Coin Door Prize at 2016 Dayton Hamvention

The Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) Team has donated two of its handsome ARISS Challenge Coins to the Dayton Amateur Radio Association as a 2016 Hamvention door prize.  The two keepsake coins are positioned side by side in a beautiful display box so that each side of the coin is seen from either direction.

2016 ARISS Dayton Hamvention Door Prize
2016 ARISS Dayton Hamvention Door Prize

The commemorative ARISS Challenge Coin is the premium received by donors who give $100 or more to ARISS.  Dayton Hamvention General Chairman Jim Tiderman, N8IDS, agreed to feature the ARISS keepsake coin by holding a special prize drawing immediately following the introduction of the winners of the 2016 Dayton Hamvention national awards at 2 pm on Sunday.

The ARISS Team kicks off its 2016 fund-raising campaign at the Dayton Hamvention to raise money for the very high cost of replacing its aging radio system on the ISS and to help defray the cost of continuing ARISS operations. This special Hamvention prize drawing is the first step of the campaign.

ARISS International Chair Frank Bauer, KA3HDO, noted the importance of this fundraising campaign: “ARISS is in need of critical upgrades of our on-orbit equipment.  The radio system in the Columbus module is over 17 years old and underpowered. We need a 21st Century next generation solution. This fundraising campaign will enable these upgrades and, as a result, significantly improve ARISS operations and provide the funding necessary to better support our stakeholders and the amateur radio community.”

Those wanting to support the ARISS fundraising campaign can donate to ARISS online via the AMSAT Website, www.amsat.org (select the “ARISS Donate” button) or the ARISS web page, www.ariss.org (select the “Donate” tab).  ARISS representatives will also be at the AMSAT Booth during the Hamvention with Challenge Coins ready for people ready to donate $100 or more.

Be sure to go to the Hara Arena at the Dayton Hamvention on Sunday, May 22, 2016 at 2 pm for the major door prize drawings … and good luck!

About ARISS
Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) is a cooperative venture of international amateur radio societies and the space agencies that support the International Space Station (ISS). In the United States, sponsors are the Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation (AMSAT), the American Radio Relay League (ARRL), and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The primary goal of ARISS is to promote exploration of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) topics by organizing scheduled contacts via amateur radio between crew members aboard the ISS and students in classrooms or informal education venues.  With the help of experienced amateur radio volunteers, ISS crews speak directly with large audiences in a variety of public forums.  Before and during these radio contacts, students, teachers, parents, and communities learn about space, space technologies, and amateur radio. For more information, go to:  www.ariss.orgwww.amsat.org , and www.arrl.org .

Also, join us on Facebook:  Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) / Follow us on Twitter:  ARISS_status

Contact:
David Jordan, AA4KN
ARISS PR
aa4kn@www.amsat.org

AMSAT videos from Dayton 2014

Tom, K3IO, was the speaker at the AMSAT/TAPR Banquet at the Dayton Hamvention. In his talk, he remembers the many Elmers that helped him with his hobby and career.

Barry, WD4ASW and AMSAT President, gives an update on AMSAT, including changes to the BoD roster, regulatory issues, membership and finances.

As AMSAT’s new VP of Engineering and Fox satellite team leader, Jerry gives an update on the Fox-1 satellite, its design, milestones, and launch opportunities. He also looks ahead to Fox-1B, Fox-1C, Fox-1D, and Fox-2.

Howard, G6LVB, gives a fascinating look into the launch and operation of the FUNcube-1 satellite, and a tentative calendar of the next three FUNcube satellites.

Drew, KO4MA, reviews six operational amateur satellites, then previews another dozen amateur satellites that will be launched soon, or should be turned over to amateur use when their primary mission is completed.

Frank, KA3HDO, gives an update on Amateur Radio on the International Space Station, including the radios and antennas on board, the impact of funding changes at NASA, and the new Ham TV system.

EMike, KC8YLD, explains how K-16 education is key to the launches of future amateur radio satellites, and discusses the joint work of AMSAT, ARRL, and NASA.

In this brief video, Spence, WA8SME, shows the next version of the WRAPS rotor with circularly polarized antennas and discusses an updated broadband preamp that now includes an antenna polarity switch.

Older AMSAT videos can be found at https://www.youtube.com/user/AMSATNA/videos

Special Thanks to Steve Belter, N9IP for recording and editing the videos from the Dayton Hamvention, making them available for those who couldn’t attend in person!

Cubesats Deployed from ISS

Friday February 28 at 0730Z, several cubesats were deployed from the International Space station.litsat deploy

Perhaps of most interest to radio amateurs are Lithuania’s first satellites, LituanicaSAT-1 and LitSat-1.

LituanicaSAT-1 carries an FM repeater with a 145.950 MHz uplink and 435.180 MHz downlink, a 9600 baud AX25 packet system with a 145.850 MHz uplink and 437.550 MHz downlink, and a CW beacon on 437.275 MHz. Detailed information may be found at http://www.kosmonautai.lt/en/satellite/  and https://www.facebook.com/Lituanicasat1

LitSat-1 carries a linear transponder of unknown bandwidth and with a reported uplink of 435.180 MHz and downlink of 145.950 MHz, a AX25 packet system with a 437.550 MHz uplink and 145.850 MHz downlink. Limited additional information can be found at https://www.facebook.com/palydovas and http://www.space-lt.eu/journeyof-thefirstlithuanian-satellites74326-1-541.html#apacia .

UAPSAT is Peru’s third satellite, and will transmit AX25 packet telemetry and an audio message on 145.980 MHz. It is unclear whether there will be a two-way capability. Additional information via Google Translate at http://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=es&u=http://www.uapsat.info/&prev=/search%3Fq%3Duapsat%26client%3Dfirefox-a%26hs%3DGt9%26rls%3Dorg.mozilla:en-US:official

ArduSat-2 and SkyCube are also included in this deployment.