ANS-328 AMSAT News Service Bulletins for November 24

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE
ANS-328

The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and information service of AMSAT, The Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in space including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building, launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio satellites.

The news feed on https://amsat.org publishes news of Amateur Radio in space as soon as our volunteers can post it. Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to: ans-editor at amsat dot org.  You can sign up for free e-mail delivery of the AMSAT News Service Bulletins via the ANS List; to join this list see:  https://www.amsat.org/mailman/listinfo/ans

In this edition:

  • AMSAT Auction Celebrating the 45th Birthday of AO-7 Now Live
  • November 18 Marked 2nd Anniversary On Orbit for AMSAT-OSCAR 91
  • November 21 Marked 6th Anniverary of AMSAT-UK’s AO-73 FUNcube-1
  • Proposed FCC Auction of C-Band Increases Competition for Allocations
  • Satellite Operations From the Queen Mary on December 14
  • Donate to AMSAT Tax-Free From Your IRA
  • Open Source ‘APRS to Discord’ Bridge Project Begins Testing
  • ARISS Activities
  • Upcoming Satellite Operations
  • The Voyage Home: Japan’s Hayabusa-2 Probe Heads Back to Earth
  • Satellite Shorts From All Over

AMSAT Auction Celebrating the 45th Birthday of AO-7 Now Live

As announced in ANS-321, AMSAT is auctioning off a set of gold-plated AO-7 cufflinks and a 50th Anniversary AMSAT lab coat (size 42R). The auctions are now live on eBay and will conclude shortly after 02:00 UTC on November 26, 2019.

Please bid today at https://www.ebay.com/usr/amsat-na

100% of the proceeds of this auction will go towards Keeping Amateur Radio in Space.

Looking ahead to the future AMSAT tweeted a quick summary of projects at:  https://twitter.com/AMSAT/status/1197528119806169091

  1. The University of Washington’s HuskySat-1 carrying an AMSAT VHF/UHF linear transponder was launched to the ISS on Cygnus on Nov 2.
    After leaving the ISS, Cygnus is expected to deploy HuskySat-1 on or about Jan 13.
  2. After completing its science mission, HuskySat-1 will be turned over to AMSAT and the transponder will be made available for amateur use. AMSAT is also working with other CubeSat builders on similar arrangements.
  3. RadFxSat-2 (Fox-1E), carrying a VHF/UHF linear transponder and radiation experiments for Vanderbilt University, is complete and awaiting launch on the first commercial flight of Virgin Orbit’s LauncherOne no earlier than 1Q 2020.
  4. The GOLF program is progressing nicely. The target delivery/integration date of GOLF-TEE is 3Q 2020. More details about the GOLF program are available in the AMSAT Engineering Report from the 2019 Space Symposium. https://youtube.com/watch?v=WWwvhuIaiBA
  5. The ARISS next generation InterOperable Radio System is planned for launch to the ISS on the SpaceX CRS-20 mission, scheduled for March 2020.
  6. The AMSAT CubeSat Simulator project led by Alan Johnston, KU2Y and Pat Kilroy, N8PK, is generating much interest. Simulators are available for loan for classrooms or events and work is underway to develop CubeSat Simulator kits. http://cubesatsim.com
  7. How can you help these projects succeed? Please consider volunteering, joining, donating, and/or purchasing items from the AMSAT store today.

[ANS thanks Paul Stoetzer, N8HM, for the above information]

November 18 Marked 2nd Anniversary On Orbit for AMSAT-OSCAR 91

Happy 2nd Anniversary, AMSAT-OSCAR 91! At 09:47:36 UTC on November 18, 2017, RadFxSat (Fox-1B) launched on a Delta II rocket from SLC-2W at Vandenberg Air Force Base and became AMSAT-OSCAR 91.

RadFxSat (Fox-1B), a 1U CubeSat, is a joint mission of AMSAT and the Institute for Space and Defense Electronics at Vanderbilt University. The Vanderbilt package is intended to measure the effects of radiation on electronic components, including demonstration of an on-orbit platform for space qualification of components as well as to validate and improve computer models for predicting radiation tolerance of semiconductors.

AMSAT constructed the remainder of the satellite including the space frame, on-board computer and power system. The amateur radio package is similar to that currently on orbit on AO-85.

RadFxSat (Fox-1B) was sent aloft as a secondary payload on the United Launch Alliance (ULA) Delta II rocket with the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS)-1 satellite. RadFxSat (Fox-1B) is one of five CubeSats making up this NASA Educational Launch of Nanosatellites (ELaNa) XIV mission, riding as secondary payloads aboard the JPSS-1 mission.

Uplink: 435.250 MHz FM (67.0 Hz CTCSS)
Downlink: 145.960 MHz FM

Satellite health and experiment telemetry are downlinked via the Data-Under-Voice (DUV) subaudible telemetry stream, which can be decoded using the FoxTelem software.

Visit the AMSAT-OSCAR 91 web page at: https://tinyurl.com/ANS-328-AO-91
Make sure you have the latest AMSAT frequencies using the page at: https://www.amsat.org/two-way-satellites/

[ANS thanks AMSAT for the above information]

November 21 Marked 6th Anniverary of AMSAT-UK’s AO-73 FUNcube-1

This week AMSAT-UK and the FUNcube team recalled the events on launch day. A very short time after the launch from Yasny in Russia and within a few minutes from deployment, the very first frame of data from the low power transmitter on board, was detected and decoded by ZS1LS in South Africa. He was able to relay the data over the internet from his Dashboard to the Data Warehouse and the numbers, appeared, as if by magic, at the launch party being held at the RSGB National Radio Centre at Bletchley Park.

After a very brief check out, the FUNcube team were able to switch the transmitter to full power, again at the very first attempt, and were quite amazed at the strength of the signal from the 300mW transmitter on 145.935 MHz. The transponder was then switched on and successfully tested.

The team finished the day with a request to AMSAT-NA for an Oscar number and were delighted to receive the AO73 Oscar 73 designation!

Since then, FUNcube-1, with a launch mass of less than 1kg, has operated continuously with only a very few interruptions. In excess of 32000 orbits, 750 million miles travelled, and with more than 7 million data packets downloaded and stored in the Data Warehouse.

The spacecraft is presently in continuous sunlight and to convert as much of the sun’s thermal energy into RF (to help keep it cool), it remains in continuous high power telemetry mode. We anticipate this situation will continue until early May next after which the team expect to have 3 months with some eclipse periods.

Of course, EO88 – Nayif 1 continues to operate autonomously with the transponder active when in eclipse and JO99 – JY1Sat, which includes image downloads, and which was launched just under a year ago, also remain active on a 24/7 basis.

The FUNcube team still receive many requests for Fitter message uploads for school events…please contact us by email to operations@funcube.org.uk giving us at least two weeks notice.

The FUNcube team continue to be very grateful to all the many stations around the world that continue to upload the telemetry that they receive to our Data Warehouse. They really need this data to provide a continuous resource for educational outreach.

Dave Johnson, G4DPZ, network administrator for the FUNcube Data Warehouse, provided this update for users of the FUNcube Dashboard Software, “The server addresses warehouse.funcube.org.uk and data.funcube.org.uk are no longer operational. If you have FUNcube Dashboard(s) using the URL data.funcube.org.uk, please change it to data.amsat-uk.org as forwarding will no longer take place.”

[ANS thanks AMSAT-UK for the above information]

The digital download version of the 2019 edition of
Getting Started with Amateur Satellites is now available as a
DRM-free PDF from the AMSAT Store. Get yours today!
https://tinyurl.com/ANS-237-Getting-Started

Proposed FCC Auction of C-Band Increases Competition for Allocations

In an IARU News Release by Dave Sumner, K1ZZ and posted by Rick Lindquist, WW1ME on November 18 via the ARRL-IARU@groups.arrl.org list he reports that the Plenary session to approve texts to be included in the Final Acts was scheduled to end at noon Thursday, November 21 and delegates at WRC-19 faced a daunting workload as the conferees try to reach consensus on several remaining issues including the agenda for the next WRC.

Small Satellites which are increasingly commercial have been granted access to the space operations bands at 137/149MHz away from amateur allocations.

The amateur secondary allocation at 5725-5850 MHz, which includes an amateur-satellite C-band downlink at 5830-5850 MHz, is the subject of an unresolved conflict over parameters for wireless access systems including radio local area networks. 5 GHz Wi-Fi will see most expansion below amateur radio in the 5150-5250 band reducing it impact on our 5725-5850 range.

An article published by CNBC, also on November 18, a news item by Michael Sheetz, “Satellite stock Intelsat drops 40% after FCC 5G decision”,  discusses increasing pressure in the United States due to a proposed public auction of 280 megahertz of the C-band spectrum. This article can be accessed in entirety at: https://tinyurl.com/ANS-328-CNBC-5G-Article

Sheetz reports that FCC Chairman Ajit Pai said in a tweet that his agency “must free up significant spectrum” for 5G telecommunications. The FCC said it expects to begin a public auction of C-band to happen before the end of 2020, a blow to satellite operators using the valuable spectrum.

The FCC Chairman’s tweet on the subject can be accessed at: https://twitter.com/AjitPaiFCC/status/1196468857025835009

Four commercial satellite operators, including Intelsat, provide C-band services in the U.S. to about 120 million households. The FCC wants to repurpose the C-band spectrum for 5G and an auction is expected to raise tens of billions of dollars. But a public auction would see the proceeds go to the government. The commercial C-band satellite operators have organized as the ‘C-Band Alliance’ to oppose a public auction of these frequencies. The C-Band Alliance has been pushing for a private auction. The group has given a proposal to the FCC where the satellite operators would keep some of the proceeds while paying taxes on the sale, as well as contributing at least $8 billion to the U.S. Treasury and possible helping fund a rural 5G network.

[ANS thanks Dave Sumner, K1ZZ, Rick Lindquist, WW1ME, the IARU and CNBC for the above information]

Satellite Operations From the Queen Mary on December 14

AMSAT will be supporting the “Ham Radio Day Aboard the Queen Mary”, an on-air event which will include satellite operations from the RMS Queen Mary, on Saturday, 14 December 2019. The Queen Mary is at the Port of Long Beach in California, grid DM03vs. The satellite operations will take place from the Queen Mary’s Sports Deck, next to the W6RO Wireless Room.

Visitors are welcome, and hams with a copy of their valid amateur license can board the ship for free on 14 December – a $40 value!

QSL cards will be available from the Associated Radio Amateurs of Long Beach (ARALB), using the process detailed at: http://www.qrz.com/db/W6RO

Satellite contacts do not require the QSO number mentioned on this page. W6RO does not use Logbook of the World.

Additional information about the event posted by The Associated Radio Amateurs of Long Beach and the Queen Mary:

The Associated Radio Amateurs of Long Beach and the Queen Mary invite you aboard the legendary ocean liner for Ham Radio Day Aboard the Queen
Mary on Saturday December 14th. Our world-famous station W6RO will be fully staffed all day. Come visit the station, take a turn as a guest operator, or work us on the air and earn our special 40th Anniversary QSL card. In addition, we will have the following special activities:

  • Static displays of the Queen Mary’s vintage maritime radio equipment.
  • On-air demonstrations of ham radio ‘go-kits’ at locations around the ship.
  • Demonstrations of ‘eclectic communications gear’, including an Aldis lamp and semaphore flags.
  • Demonstrations of satellite ham radio, with actual contacts being made through satellites in orbit.

Basic admission to board the ship is FREE for licensed radio amateurs this day. Simply show your current amateur radio license at the Hotel entrance and come aboard! The free boarding offer is subject to the following restrictions:

  • A valid FCC license document must be presented. (QM personnel will not look you up in the FCC database, QRZ, etc.)
  • Non-licensed friends and family members are not included.
  • Free boarding of the ship does not include admission to the Queen Mary Christmas event.
  • Free boarding does not include parking. Normal parking rates apply. For an alternative, ride the free Long Beach Transit Passport bus,or try LBT’s AquaBus or AquaLink boat shuttles to get to the Queen Mary.

We’re looking forward to seeing YOU on board! 73

[ANS thanks Patrick Stoddard, WD9EWK/VA7EWK, and the Associated Radio Amateurs of Long Beach and the Queen Mary]

Need new satellite antennas? Purchase Arrows, Alaskan Arrows, and M2 LEO-Packs
from the AMSAT Store. When you purchase through AMSAT, a portion of the proceeds
goes towards Keeping Amateur Radio in Space.
https://amsat.org/product-category/hardware/

Donate to AMSAT Tax-Free From Your IRA

Are you over 70-1/2 years of age and need to meet your IRA’s Required Minimum Distribution for 2019? Consider making a donation to AMSAT!

Under the Protecting Americans from Tax Hikes Act of 2015, individuals over 70-1/2 years of age may make direct transfers of up to $100,000 per year from a traditional IRA to an eligible charity without increasing their taxable income. Consult your tax advisor or accountant to make certain you are eligible.

AMSAT is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit educational and scientific organization whose purpose is to design, construct, launch, and operate satellites in space and to provide the support needed to encourage amateurs to utilize these resources. AMSAT’s federal tax ID is 52-0888529.

Open Source ‘APRS to Discord’ Bridge Project Begins Testing

Harold Giddings, KR0SIV, reports on an on-going open source project called the ‘APRS to Discord bridge’. The Discord network supports text and voice chat, project documentation and source code for developers, gamers, and makers in an open source environment. For more information about the Discord network see https://discordapp.com/

The APRS to Discord bridge, by Alexandre Rouma (@WhatsTheGeekYT on twitter), is designed to connect APRS traffic from terrestrial and spacecraft sources with user’s servers on the Discord network. The software, still under development, is pretty simple at the moment but will be open source (Node.js). The design will allow amateur radio groups to set up their own node for bridging an APRS callsign/message to their discord server. It is written in a way that requires the bot operator to validate amateur operators with a special role in Discord preventing illicit use by non-licensed operators.

Source code can be found here:
https://github.com/AlexandreRouma/aprs_bridge
https://github.com/AlexandreRouma/npm-aprs-parser

Harold also hosts the SDR-centric ‘Signals Everywhere’ channel on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/signalseverywhere

[ANS thanks Harold Giddings, KR0SIV, for the above information]

ARISS Activities

  • Lakeside Elementary School, West Point, UT, telebridge via IK1SLD
    Contact was successful: Mon 2019-11-18
  • Istituto San Paolo delle Suore Angeliche, Milano, Italy and Istituto Comprensivo Di Merone – Mons. A. Pirovano, Merone, Italy, telebridge via W6SRJ
    Contact was successful: Thu 2019-11-21
  • MAOU Lyceum No. 39, Nizhny Tagil, Russia, direct via TBD
    The ISS callsign is presently scheduled to be RSØISS
    The scheduled astronaut is Alexander Skvortsov
    Contact is go for 2011-11-30 14:15 UTC

A reminder that the deadline to submit proposals for ARISS contacts to be scheduled between July 1, 2020 and December 31, 2020 is coming up on
November 30, 2019. For more information visit https://www.ariss.org/

Possible RSØISS – Inter MAI-75 SSTV activity is tentatively planned for Dec 14 – 15, 2019. Details will follow later, the organization of this SSTV event depends on the necessary EVA activities. No SSTV can take place during EVA activities.

[ANS thanks Charlie Sufana, AJ9N, and David Jordan, AA4KN, ARISS operation team members, for the above information]

Purchase AMSAT Gear on our Zazzle storefront.
25% of the purchase price of each product goes
towards Keeping Amateur Radio in Space
 https://www.zazzle.com/amsat_gear

Upcoming Satellite Operations

  • Nunavut, Canada (ER60) November 11 – December 6, 2019
    Look for VY0ERC to once again be active from the Eureka Weather station (NA-008, Zone 2) between Nov. 11 to Dec. 6. This station is operated by the Eureka Amateur Radio Club [probably the most northerly located amateur radio club in the world] from Eureka, Nunavut. The suggested bands are 40 and 20 meters (possibly 80m), as well as FM satellites (from ER60, EQ79) using SSB, the Digital modes and very slow CW. Activity will be limited to their spare time. QSL via M0OXO, OQRS or direct. For updates, see: https://twitter.com/vy0erc
  • Key West (EL94) December 3-6, 2019
    Tanner, W9TWJ, will be vacationing in Key West December 3-6. Key word is vacation, but he will jump on some FM satellite passes to activate EL94 for those that need it or just want to chat. Watch Tanner’s Twitter feed for further announcements: https://twitter.com/twjones85
  • Hawaii (BK19, BK28, BK29, BL20) December 21-28, 2019
    Alex, N7AGF, is heading back to Hawaii over Christmas. This will be a holiday-style activation, with special emphasis on the grid that got away – BK28. Keep an eye on Alex’s Twitter feed for further announcements: https://twitter.com/N7AGF

Please submit any additions or corrections to ke4al (at) amsat.org

[ANS thanks Robert Bankston, KE4AL, AMSAT VP – User Services, for the above information]

AMSAT, along with our ARISS partners, is developing an amateur radio package,
including two-way communication capability, to be carried on-board Gateway in
lunar orbit. Support AMSAT’s projects today at https://www.amsat.org/donate/ 

The Voyage Home: Japan’s Hayabusa-2 Probe Heads Back to Earth

By Kyoko Hasegawa – Tokyo

Japan’s Hayabusa-2 mission to the asteroid Ryugu received its orders to head for home on Wednesday, November 13. Next, on November 18 it broke free of the asteroid’s gravity. It will fire its main engines early next month en route to Earth, JAXA said.

Hayabusa-2 is carrying samples that could shed light on the origins of the Solar System. It took the probe three-and-a-half years to get to the asteroid but the return journey should be significantly shorter because Earth and Ryugu will be much closer due to their current positions.

Ryugu’s orbit ranges from .96 AU to 1.41 AU with a period of 474 days, coming within just 95,400 km of Earth at its closest (just 1/4 LD), but is currently 1.7 AU away. Hayabusa will spend the next year closing that distance to Earth and will eject its sample capsule into the atmosphere in December 2020. After the departure burn Hayabusa-2 had changed it’s orbit to a 0.96 x 1.41 AU x 5.9 deg heliocentric orbit.

Hayabusa-2 is expected to drop the samples off in the South Australian desert. Under the current plan, Hayabusa-2 will boldly continue its journey in space after dropping off its capsule to Earth, and might “carry out another asteroid exploration,” according to JAXA.

Access the full article (and photo) at: https://tinyurl.com/ANS-328-Hyabusa-Coming-Home

[ANS thanks SpaceDaily.com for the above information]

Satellite Shorts From All Over

  • AMSAT has received the sad news on the passing of Brian Kantor, WB6CYT (SK). Brian was one of the co-founders (with Phil Karn, KA9Q) of AMPRnet, the TCP/IP over amateur radio network. Brian continued to manage it until his passing. Brian recently created and served as chair and CEO of Amateur Radio Digital Communications (ARDC), a charitable foundation funded by the sale of unused AMPRnet IPv4 addresses. ARDC promotes STEM education and amateur radio digital development through scholarships and by funding the development of open source hardware and software. Brian will be sorely missed and impossible to replace. Memorial arrangements will be announced when known. via Phil Karn, KA9Q)
  • UniverseToday.com notes the contribution of Daniel Estévez, EA4GPZ, with the location of the impact site of China’s Longjiang-2 satellite on the moon: https://tinyurl.com/ANS-328-EA4GPZ-LunarImpact  The article notes, “Among amateur astronomists and citizen scientists, Daniel Estévez is a well-known figure. In addition to being an amateur radio operator with a PhD in Mathematics and a BSc in Computer Science, Estévez is also an amateur spacecraft tracker.” (via UniverseToday.com)
  • Roland Hesmondhalg spoke on public radio station WFIT with FL Tech Professor Ken Ernandes, N2WWD, and two senior students Luiz Fernando Leal and Antonio Masturzo about the amateur radio project on the ISS. Did you know you can use amateur radio to talk to astronauts in space? Ken Ernandes is part of the team building the next upgraded communication station to be flown on the ISS this coming year. The program is primarily intended by NASA to promote STEAM in schools. There is an application process to get a scheduled school contact and he would be happy to work with any body on the application process. Listen on the link at: https://tinyurl.com/ANS-328-WFIT-Interview
  • NASA released their latest software catalog offering FREE NASA Technology software packages that are applicable to academic research, engineering development, business applications & more! NASA Press Release: https://tinyurl.com/ANS-328-NASA-Software-Press  Access the software at: http://software.nasa.gov
  • Explore student STEM opportunities, downloads, mission information and Artemis Student Challenges on NASA’s STEM Engagement pages at: https://www.nasa.gov/stem/artemis.html – then – try your hand at driving a Mars rover: https://spaceplace.nasa.gov/explore-mars/en/
  • John Brier, KG4AKV, wrote, “A woman in Israel recently contacted me about including some of my videos in a video she was going to make about how to view the ISS. Well, she just uploaded that video and I have to say, it is pretty good: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=laQ9VEJJmpU  (To turn on English subtitles while viewing YouTube on the web/desktop, click the CC button in the bottom right corner of the video. On mobile, tap the three dots in the top right and then tap captions) – via John Brier, KG4AKV
  • Paul Wade, W1GHZ, author of the W1GHZ Microwave Antenna Book says he has added an update of Chapter 7, Slot Antennas, and included an improved 32-bit version of the HDL_ANT program for Windows 7 and 10. Access the book at: http://w1ghz.org/antbook/preface.htm  Click on the ‘Table of Contents’ link to continue. (Paul Wade, W1GHZ via the microwave list)
  • Scott Manley posted a video showing the effect if all satellites in orbit were visible. There are over ten thousand satellites in orbit, but only the largest ones in low earth orbit are visible in the hours just after sunset and before sunrise. What would the sky look like if you could see everything in space? He took satellite data and rendered a view of the night sky for an ‘average’ viewer in North America. View the satellites at: https://youtu.be/dJNGi-bt9NM (via Scott Manley’s YouTube channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCxzC4EngIsMrPmbm6Nxvb-A )
  • Voyager’s transmitters use just 23 watts, roughly the same as an incandescent refrigerator bulb, yet we are able to interpret the 0.1 billion-billionth of a Watt that makes it to earth from 11 billion kilometers away. An article at wired.com explains: https://www.wired.com/2013/09/vintage-voyager-probes/
  • AMSAT-LU (Argentina) plans to operate their WSPR buoy when it is deployed between November 25 through December 12, weather condition permitting. The WSPR beacon will transmit on 14.095,6 MHz with 900 mW, callsign LU7AA. The beacon will be active for 2 minutes ON followed with 8 minutes of standby. They appreciate WSPR reception reports to wsprnet.org which will qualify you for an award certificate: http://lu7aa.org.ar/wspr.asp   AMSAT-LU Buoy  Project page can be found at: http://amsat.org.ar/?f=boya  APRS tracking can be found at: http://aprs.fi?call=lu7aa-8
  • Versions 1.46 and 1.47 (to address a bug fix) of the Magic-Eye Plugin for SDRSharp has been released:
    https://github.com/BlackApple62/SDRSharp-Magic-Eye-Plugin/releases
    This plug-in adds an old-style “Magic Eye”, or “Cat’s Eye” to SDR# software (available via www.airspy.com) This release adds an analog-style SNR Meter. This Plugin, is compiled for 32bit platform, with .NET Framework version 4.6. It may not run on SDR# versions older than r1362 (14 Sept 2015) – via airspy.com and GitHub
  • If you’ve been kept up at night trying to find a solution to the chaotic three-body problem access a paper, “Newton vs the machine: solving the chaotic three-body problem using deep neural networks” from: https://arxiv.org/abs/1910.07291 – and if you’re not sure what is the significance of this check out an explanation posted at: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Three-body_problem

 

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the President’s Club. Members of the President’s Club, as sustaining donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive additional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT office.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the student rate for a maximum of six post-secondary years in this status. Contact Martha at the AMSAT office for additional student membership information.

73 and remember to help keep amateur radio in space,
This week’s ANS Editor,
JoAnne Maenpaa, K9JKM
k9jkm at amsat dot org

ANS-321 AMSAT News Service Bulletins for November 17

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE
ANS-321

The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and information service of AMSAT, The Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in space including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building, launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio satellites.

The news feed on https://amsat.org publishes news of Amateur Radio in space as soon as our volunteers can post it. Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to: ans-editor at amsat dot org.  You can sign up for free e-mail delivery of the AMSAT News Service Bulletins via the ANS List; to join this list see:  https://www.amsat.org/mailman/listinfo/ans

In this edition:

  • Happy 45th Birthday AMSAT-OSCAR 7!
  • 19th Anniversary of ARISS Operations
  • PO-101 (Diwata-2) QSLs Available
  • IARU Update Regarding Amateur Satellite Allocations
  • AMSAT Member Dhruv Rebba, KC9ZJX, Youth Excellence Award
  • Changes to AMSAT-NA TLE Distribution for November 14, 2019
  • Upcoming ARISS Contact Schedule
  • Upcoming Satellite Operations
  • Satellite Shorts From All Over

Happy 45th Birthday AMSAT-OSCAR 7!

At 17:11 UTC on November 15, 1974 a Delta-2310 rocket lifted off from SLC-2W at Vandenberg Air Force Base, sending AO-7 into orbit along with NOAA-4 and Intasat. Details about the launch and initial telemetry reception can be found at https://tinyurl.com/ANS-321-AO7Launch

After nearly 7 years of service, AO-7 was thought to have reached the end of its life in June 1981 due to battery failure. A retrospective detailing its exemplary record was published in the AMSAT Satellite Report, available at https://tinyurl.com/ANS-321-AO7Record

Though it was thought to be lost in 1981, there are reports that the Polish Solidarity movement used AO-7 to pass messages in 1982 while Poland was under martial law. An article, in Polish, with the details is available at https://tinyurl.com/AO-7-Poland

Twenty years later, on June 21, 2002, G3IOR reported that he heard an old-style CW beacon from an unknown OSCAR satellite near 145.970 MHz. This was soon identified as AMSAT-OSCAR 7. The original AMSAT-BB post with news of the discovery is archived at https://tinyurl.com/ANS-321-AO7BB

Despite some pre-launch predictions that the CMOS logic circuits on-board “wouldn’t last 3 weeks,” AO-7 remains operational and well-used while in sunlight. It is the oldest operational satellite, in any service, in orbit. https://www.amsat.org/two-way-satellites/ao-7/

To celebrate AO-7’s 45th birthday, AMSAT will auction off a set of gold-plated AO-7 cufflinks and a 50th Anniversary AMSAT lab coat (size 42R) next week. Check AMSAT-BB or AMSAT’s social media pages for details on Monday morning.

[ANS thanks AMSAT for the above information]

19th Anniversary of ARISS Operations

On November 13, 2000, the ARISS amateur radio payload was turned on and the first operations occurred over Russia and the United States.

Our ARISS team is working feverishly on the final certification of our next generation radio system: the Interoperable Radio System. We thank all those that have supported this development effort through team support as well as donations!!  We continue to move closer to a planned March 2020 launch of the hardware on SpaceX CRS-20.

[ANS thanks Frank Bauer, KA3HDO, AMSAT Vice President for Human Spaceflight and ARISS International Chair for the above information]

PO-101 (Diwata-2) QSLs Available

The PHL Microsatellite Program, Electrical and Electronics Engineering Institute, University of the Philippines operates PO-101. The FM transponder is available on a schedule published by the team on the PO-101 Users Group on Twitter (@Diwata2PH) and the PO-101 Users Group on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/groups/880769575655081

PO-101 Operations (FM)
Uplink:   437.500 MHz – 141.3 Hz PL Tone
Downlink: 145.900 MHz

QSL Cards will be provided through email every month to users who submit their QSO information via PO-101 using the Google form posted at: https://forms.gle/XZnjRGNSC2jSF51j6

Users may also upload your contact recordings or videos with PO-101 here: https://forms.gle/pV5DgBQeWf1fjqmu9

[ANS thanks the PO-101 Diwata2-PH team for the above information]

The digital download version of the 2019 edition of
Getting Started with Amateur Satellites is now available as a
DRM-free PDF from the AMSAT Store. Get yours today!
https://tinyurl.com/ANS-237-Getting-Started

IARU Update Regarding Amateur Satellite Allocations

The second week of the World Radiocommunication Conference reports on the status of two issues affecting the amateur satellite service. In a report written by Dave Sumner, K1ZZ, first is an agenda item currently under review during this WRC-19 session; second is planning for future pressure on frequencies for the amateur satellite service.

Current WRC-19
While it does not directly affect us – work at WRC-15 saw to that – we are following an agenda item that seeks spectrum for telemetry, tracking and command in the space operation service for non-GSO satellites with short duration missions (Cubesats, among others). We would like a solution to be found to cut down on the misuse of the very limited amateur-satellite spectrum for commercial applications. Discussions are focusing on spectrum near 137 MHz (down)/149MHz (up) but reaching agreement is proving to be very difficult.

Future – WRC-23 
With the spectrum from 8.3 kHz to 275 GHz fully allocated and some bands above 275 GHz already identified for particular uses, any proposal for new allocations involves sharing with one or more incumbent services. The pressures for spectrum access to accommodate new uses for commercial purposes are intense; for an established service such as ours, any WRC that does not reduce our own useful spectrum access is a success.

The idea of including the amateur two meter band in a study of non-safety aeronautical mobile service applications has not resurfaced. However, the IARU is concerned with a proposed item for WRC-23 entitled: “Review of the amateur service and the amateur-satellite service allocations to ensure the protection of the radionavigation-satellite service (space-to-Earth) in the frequency band 1240-1300 MHz.”

Our regulatory status is already clear. The amateur service is secondary in this band and the amateur-satellite service is permitted to operate in the Earth-to-space direction on a non-interference basis in the band 1260-1270 MHz. In the international Radio Regulations this is all the protection a primary service such as radionavigation-satellite requires; implementation is up to individual administrations.

The one well-documented case of interference to a Galileo receiver that prompted this proposed agenda item occurred more than five years ago and was quickly resolved by the administration concerned. There have been no known interference cases to user terminals.

An amateur service allocation of 1215-1300 MHz was made on a primary, exclusive basis in 1947, later downgraded to secondary to accommodate radiolocation (radar) and narrowed to 1240-1300 MHz. The radionavigation-satellite service was added in 2000. As a secondary service amateur radio has operated successfully in the band for many years. Given the relatively modest density and numbers of amateur transmissions in the band, we view the Galileo-oriented proposal for an agenda item as disproportionate.

The IARU recognizes the concern and does not want the amateur service to affect the operation of the Galileo system in any way. It has already updated its operational recommendations for amateur stations in Region 1. If necessary, further recommendations may be developed and rolled out globally.

In CEPT, two preliminary measurement studies of Galileo receiver performance/vulnerability (from 2015 and 2019) are currently being evaluated. Discussions can be more timely and focused within CEPT. The IARU believes that this process already offers the potential for a satisfactory solution and thus the issue does not warrant WRC action and the commitment of ITU resources.

Posted on: http://www.iaru.org/news–events

[ANS thanks Dave Sumner, K1ZZ and the IARU for the above information]

Need new satellite antennas? Purchase Arrows, Alaskan Arrows, and M2 LEO-Packs
from the AMSAT Store. When you purchase through AMSAT, a portion of the proceeds
goes towards Keeping Amateur Radio in Space.
https://amsat.org/product-category/hardware/

AMSAT Member Dhruv Rebba, KC9ZJX, Youth Excellence Award

Congratulations to AMSAT member Dhruv Rebba, KC9ZJX, Newsline Young Ham of the Year on his award as the first ever Youth Excellence Award in collaboration with McLean County (Bloomington-Normal, IL) Indian Association (MCIA) for the year 2019.

The MCIA invited nominations for individuals from Asian Indian youth in Bloomington-Normal who have gone above and beyond in community service and individual attainment. Dhruv’s award was based on attaining the goals of the Youth Excellence Award:

  1. To celebrate exemplary behavior among young people in Blo-No’s Asian Indian Community
  1. To encourage and motivate young people in the pursuit of Excellence & Creativity in the Performing Arts, Community Leadership, Sports, Academics, Innovation etc. to name a few
  1. To push one’s own self-imposed boundaries and become better versions of oneself
  1. To encourage young people to be positive role models/ambassadors and mentors in their communities
  1. To foster a spirit of volunteerism and public service among youth

Dhruv received his award during the MCIA Diwali Dinner 2019 in Bloomington-Normal, Illinois.

[ANS thanks and congratulates Dhruv and his father, Hari Rebba. and the McLean County Indian Association for the above information]

Changes to AMSAT-NA TLE Distribution for November 14, 2019

The following Amateur Radio satellite has decayed from orbit and has been removed from this week’s TLE distribution:

NO-83(BRICSAT-P) – NORAD CAT ID 40655 – Decayed 11/07/2019 at approx. 19:49 UTC

Thanks to Alan Biddle, WA4SCA for decay date estimate.

[ANS thanks Ray Hoad, WA5QGD, AMSAT Orbital Elements Manager, for the above information]

G4BAO 23cm-45 W-PA Available as Public Domain

This repository contains details of the G4BAO 45 Watt 23cm Power Amplifier published in RSGB RadCom Magazine in June 2009 and later in the book ” Microwave Know How for the Radio Amateur” by Andy Barter, G8ATD.

This PA was sold for many years as a kit by the designer. The decision has been made to not sell any further kits so the designs are now made available here under the terms of an MIT license. It includes a copy of the original article, Eagle board and schematic files, plus Gerber files for the PCB, which must be made from Taconic 0.7mm RF35 substrate.

The design can be accessed at: https://github.com/g4bao/23cm-45W-PA

[ANS thanks AMSAT-UK for the above information]

Donate to AMSAT Tax-Free From Your IRA

Are you over 70-1/2 years of age and need to meet your IRA’s Required Minimum Distribution for 2019? Consider making a donation to AMSAT!

Under the Protecting Americans from Tax Hikes Act of 2015, individuals over 70-1/2 years of age may make direct transfers of up to $100,000 per year from a traditional IRA to an eligible charity without increasing their taxable income. Consult your tax advisor or accountant to make certain you are eligible.

AMSAT is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit educational and scientific organization whose purpose is to design, construct, launch, and operate satellites in space and to provide the support needed to encourage amateurs to utilize these resources. AMSAT’s federal tax ID is 52-0888529.

Upcoming ARISS Contact Schedule

Quick list of scheduled contacts and events as of 2019-11-15 02:00 UTC

  • Lakeside Elementary School, West Point, UT, telebridge via IK1SLD
    The ISS callsign is presently scheduled to be OR4ISS
    The scheduled astronaut is Drew Morgan KI5AAA
    Contact is go for: Mon 2019-11-18 19:01:06 UTC
    Watch for live streaming at www.ariotti.com starting about 15 minutes before AOS
  • Istituto San Paolo delle Suore Angeliche, Milano, Italy and Istituto Comprensivo Di Merone – Mons. A. Pirovano, Merone, Italy, telebridge via W6SRJ
    The ISS callsign is presently scheduled to be NA1SS
    The scheduled astronaut is Luca Parmitano KF5KDP
    Contact is go for: Thu 2019-11-21 09:12:07 UTC
  • MAOU Lyceum No. 39, Nizhny Tagil, Russia, direct via TBD
    The ISS callsign is presently scheduled to be RSØISS
    The scheduled astronaut is Alexander Skvortsov
    Contact is go for 2011-11-30 14:15 UTC

A reminder that the deadline to submit proposals for ARISS contacts to be scheduled between July 1, 2020 and December 31, 2020 is coming up on November 30, 2019. For more information visit https://www.ariss.org/

[ANS thanks Charlie Sufana, AJ9N, and David Jordan, AA4KN, ARISS operation team members, for the above information]

Purchase AMSAT Gear on our Zazzle storefront.
25% of the purchase price of each product goes
towards Keeping Amateur Radio in Space
 https://www.zazzle.com/amsat_gear

Upcoming Satellite Operations

  • Nunavut, Canada (ER60) November 11 – December 6, 2019
    Look for VY0ERC to once again be active from the Eureka Weather station (NA-008, Zone 2) between Nov. 11 to Dec. 6. This station is operated by the Eureka Amateur Radio Club [probably the most northerly located amateur radio club in the world] from Eureka, Nunavut. The suggested bands are 40 and 20 meters (possibly 80m), as well as FM satellites (from ER60, EQ79) using SSB, the Digital modes and very slow CW. Activity will be limited to their spare time. QSL via M0OXO, OQRS or direct. For updates, see: https://twitter.com/vy0erc
  • EA9 Melilla (IM85) November 18-21, 2019
    Philippe, EA4NF, will be operating from Melilla as EA9/EA4NF from November 18 to 21, 2019. This very small Spanish territory located in Northern Africa, which is a very rare GRID and is listed as one of the Most Wanted SAT DXCC. Updates and passes on Philippe’s Twitter:  https://twitter.com/EA4NF_SAT 
  • New River Gorge National River, WV (EM98) November 21-24, 2019
    Michael, N4DCW, is visiting New River Gorge National River (with sat gear) and a swing through EM97 on his way home.  Watch for further announcements on Michael’s Twitter feed:  https://twitter.com/MWimages
  • Key West (EL94) December 3-6, 2019
    Tanner, W9TWJ, will be vacationing in Key West December 3-6. Key word is vacation, but he will jump on some FM satellite passes to activate EL94 for those that need it or just want to chat. Watch Tanner’s Twitter feed for further announcements: https://twitter.com/twjones85
  • Hawaii (BK19, BK28, BK29, BL20) December 21-28, 2019
    Alex, N7AGF, is heading back to Hawaii over Christmas. This will be a holiday-style activation, with special emphasis on the grid that got away – BK28. Keep an eye on Alex’s Twitter feed for further announcements: https://twitter.com/N7AGF

Please submit any additions or corrections to ke4al (at) amsat.org

[ANS thanks Robert Bankston, KE4AL for the above information.]

AMSAT, along with our ARISS partners, is developing an amateur radio package,
including two-way communication capability, to be carried on-board Gateway in
lunar orbit. Support AMSAT’s projects today at https://www.amsat.org/donate/ 

Satellite Shorts From All Over

  • Dr. Alan Johnston, KU2Y, AMSAT VP Educational Relations will be giving a presentation at the 110th Radio Club of America Awards Banquet and Technical Symposium, held this year at the Westin Times Square, New York City on November 23. The topic is “Designing the AMSAT CubeSat Simulator: A Functional Satellite Model for the Classroom”. For more information see: https://tinyurl.com/ANS-321-RCA
  • The Seattle Times featured an article about the University of Washington’s HuskySat-1 satellite. HuskySat-1 carries an AMSAT-provided linear transponder. https://tinyurl.com/ANS-321-UW
  • Proceedings of the Microwave Update 2019, held in Dallas, Texas October 3-5, have been published as a PDF which includes a couple of satellite related presentations. It is now available for free download at http://ntms.org/files/MUD2019/MUD_Proceedings_2019.pdf   (via North Texas Microwave Society)
  • All the photos in the MUD Proceedings are in black and white. The MUD GNR file is in color at http://www.ntms.org/  (via Zack W9SZ on the Microwave list)
  • All videos from the AMSAT-DL symposium Bochum are online. Recorded from the wideband transponder by DB8TF. A playlist includes all videos from Saturday and Sunday:  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC1Gtsa1KaEAgRc-dvWo44QQ  If you can, please translate Screen texts to other languages and add to the video. (Via AMSAT-DL)
  • On October 7, 8 and 9, 2019, the University of New Brunswick’s (UNB) Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and CubeSat NB hosted the first of three Preliminary Design Review (PDR) meetings for the Canadian CubeSat Project initiated by the Canadian Space Agency (CSA). Radio Amateurs of Canada was present for the meeting. More details at https://tinyurl.com/ANS-321-RAC  (Via RAC)
  • This page gives a statistical plot showing groups of satellites as a plot of the semi-major axis of the orbit against orbital inclination resulting in “families” and “clusters” in orbit.  https://tinyurl.com/ANS-321-Orbits

 

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the President’s Club. Members of the President’s Club, as sustaining donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive additional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT office.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the student rate for a maximum of six post-secondary years in this status. Contact Martha at the AMSAT office for additional student membership information.

73 and remember to help keep amateur radio in space,
This week’s ANS Editor,
Paul Stoetzer, N8HM
N8HM at amsat dot org

ANS-314 AMSAT News Service Bulletins for November 10

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE
ANS-314

The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and information service of AMSAT, The Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in space including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building, launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio satellites.

The news feed on https://amsat.org publishes news of Amateur Radio in space as soon as our volunteers can post it. Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to: ans-editor at amsat dot org.  You can sign up for free e-mail delivery of the AMSAT News Service Bulletins via the ANS List; to join this list see:  https://www.amsat.org/mailman/listinfo/ans

In this edition:

  • HuskySat Paving the Way for Cooperation
  • WRC-19 Debates Satellite Allocations
  • Electron Booster on the Pad for Rocket Lab’s 10th Mission
  • 2020 Cubesat Developers Workshop Call for Papers
  • Second Batch of 50th Anniversary “Friends of 50” Certificates Sent
  • AMSAT Seeks Digital Communications Team Members
  • NO-83 (BRICSAT-P) Nears Re-Entry
  • Upcoming ARISS Contact Schedule
  • Upcoming Satellite Operations
  • Satellite Shorts From All Over

HuskySat Paving the Way for Cooperation

As previously reported by ANS, HuskySat-1 achieved orbit last week aboard the Cygnus cargo vessel, which docked to the International Space Station on Nov. 4. The satellite is scheduled for a boost to higher orbit and deployment in January. Following completion of its primary mission, it will be turned over to AMSAT for operation of its linear transponder sometime in the second quarter of 2020.

Jerry Buxton, NØJY, AMSAT VP – Engineering, explains that this partnership presented some regulatory challenges, but has paved the way for similar partnerships in the future:

“The Part 97 license that AMSAT will operate under does not include or allow the use of any of the experiments on board.  As those experiments were not able to conform to the Part 97 so called ‘educational exemption’, including the K-band radio, that is ultimately why two licenses were required. {art 5 Experimental is operated by UW for everything including the telemetry downlink of the AMSAT transponder module, and the transponder must remain off during that operation. Part 97 operation by AMSAT will solely be the AMSAT transponder module.

“This was the first partnership with an educational institution where an AMSAT radio was flown on a non-AMSAT (UW in this case) CubeSat. In the process of working with the FCC and NASA to obtain a single Part 97 license that was not complicated or restricted by “pecuniary interest”, the experience developed an understanding with FCC as to how a mission such as HuskySat-1 could be fully licensed under Part 97. There were delays and difficulties in executing all of the requirements to qualify Part 97 and that ultimately carried on up to the mission deadline requirement for having a license in hand in order for HuskySat-1 to be integrated on the LV. The only way forward at that time, in order for UW to make the launch, was to do the separate licensing.

“It was lots of work and some good frustration along the way. I thank and commend our partners at University of Washington as well as the FCC for their work to make it happen, and our friends at NASA for giving us the opportunity to push for a path to amateur radio licensing for more of the CubeSat launches they sponsor. I believe that it has resulted in a known path toward fully Part 97 licensed educational(e.g. university) CubeSats. That should in turn offer more opportunities for AMSAT radios to fly as the communications package for a mission as well as an operating amateur radio satellite, in the same way as the CubeSats we produce.”

(ANS thanks Jerry Buxton, NØJY, AMSAT VP – Engineering for the above information)

The digital download version of the 2019 edition of
Getting Started with Amateur Satellites is now available as a
DRM-free PDF from the AMSAT Store. Get yours today!
https://tinyurl.com/ANS-237-Getting-Started

WRC-19 Debates Satellite Allocations

The Radio Society of Great Britain (RSGB), International Amateur Radio Union (IARU), and ARRL have posted updates on activities at the 2019 World Radiocommunication Conference currently taking place in Sharm El-Sheikh, Egypt.

One early agreement was to turn down requested changes to one of the amateur satellite allocations. The band 47.0 – 47.2 GHz was allocated solely to the Amateur and Amateur Satellite Services by the 1979 World Administrative Radio Conference (WARC-79). Commercial wireless broadband industries had expressed interest in the band being designated for International Mobile Telecommunications (IMT), and there was some concern that such a proposal might be made at WRC-19. The fact that none was forthcoming was due in part to the work of the IARU at the Conference Preparatory Meeting earlier this year and in the six regional telecommunications organizations. The WRC has agreed to “no change” at 47.0 – 47.2 GHz.

One of the most difficult issues facing WRC-19 is to develop an agenda for WRC-23. Dozens of proposals for agenda items have been suggested, and they cannot all be accommodated. One proposal being introduced for the next World Radio Conference in 2023 is protecting the Radio Navigation Satellite Service (Galileo, etc.) from secondary amateur usage in the 23cm band (1.2 GHz — the amateur satellite band is between 1260 MHz and 1270 MHz for up-links only).

Future mobile/IMT (cell phone) allocations were also being discussed in the 3-18 GHz range (including our 10 GHz satellite band). Another item may even affect 241 – 700 GHz. However, it will be a while before the WRC-23 agenda gets agreed at this conference, and these items may or may not be up for debate at the next conference.

Daily bulletins on the progress of WRC-19 are being posted at: https://rsgb.org/main/blog/category/news/special-focus/wrc-19/

During this period of World Radio Conference, one place to follow the events and issues is on The ARRL discussion group for the International Amateur Radio Union. The group provides a forum for anyone interested in the work of the IARU. It is open to participants anywhere, whether or not they are members of an IARU member-society. Additional information and a link to join the group can be found at https://groups.arrl.org/g/ARRL-IARU

[ANS thanks Trevor Essex, M5AKA, AMSAT-UK, and ARRL for the above information]

Electron Booster on the Pad for Rocket Lab’s 10th Mission

Rocket Lab has announced that its next mission will launch multiple microsatellites in a rideshare mission representing five different countries. The launch window for Rocket Lab’s tenth flight, will open November 25, New Zealand time, and take place from Rocket Lab Launch Complex 1 on New Zealand’s Mahia Peninsula.

Onboard this rideshare mission are six spacecraft comprised of 5cm PocketQube microsatellites from satellite manufacturer and mission management provider Alba Orbital. Two of these satellites include downlinks in the UHF amateur radio band.

TRSI is a PocketQube for technology demonstration. Its main objective is to show which functionality can be achieved with dimensions of 5cm x 5cm x 5cm. It carries two experiments that are connected to the amateur-satellite service.

  • First is a waterfall experiment which will show an image in the waterfall diagram by hopping the frequency within its transmission band (image-type beacon).
  • The second experiment is to analyze RF reception capabilities from LEO with a novel detector receiver and a small patch antenna. It was designed to test if small satellite receivers which don´t need deployable antennas are feasible. The received signal´s envelope will be sampled and forwarded using UHF in MFSK for signal analysis. During the experiment phase the satellite will also perform as an amateur CW repeater, providing additional RX strength indication; eg. CW morse signals will be re-sent in MFSK, showing the RX amplitude in dBm. A downlink on 437.075 MHz has been coordinated.
  • IARU Frequency Coordination information has been posted at: http://www.amsatuk.me.uk/iaru/finished_detail.php?serialnum=649

FossaSat-1 PocketQube by AMSAT-EA which has a 5x5x5cm structure and a total mass of 250 grams. Radio link testing features a new experi-mental RF chirp modulation called LoRa which greatly improves the link budget reducing the power consumed and reduces the cost of receivers.

  • The output power from the transmitter required for the correct reception during a pass is also very low at well under 100mW, being spread spectrum at such low power it poses no interference risk. It operates at a considerable level below the noise level of other systems and would cause no interference to weak narrowband signals.
  • Students & amateurs will be able to receive telemetry from the satellite with inexpensive hardware, expanding & promoting the amateur satellite community with youth. Uplink challenges will also be carried out with rewards for amateurs.
  • The mission is completely open source with all information regarding the design of the satellite & how to decode its information clearly laid out & hosted by AMSAT-EA. The site will provide decoding software for SDR use in order to allow anyone to decode LoRa using common existing hardware & host software for users to submit telemetry data, making all data public and rewarding users with certificates & awards.
  • The UHF downlink plans on using FSK RTTY 45 BAUD ITA2, 100mW 183hz Shift and LoRa 125kHz, Chirp Spread Spectrum Modulation, 180 bps, 100mW. A downlink on 436.700 MHz has been coordinated.
  • IARU Frequency Coordination information has been posted at: http://www.amsatuk.me.uk/iaru/finished_detail.php?serialnum=652

A commercial payload on board is ALE-2 from a Tokyo-based company creating microsatellites that simulate meteor particles. See: http://star-ale.com/en/news/317/2019/01/04/ for more information.

Rocket Labs mission web page can be found at: https://tinyurl.com/y672rjj5

[ANS thanks Rocket Labs, IARU, AMSAT-EA, TRSI, and Alba Orbital  for the above information]

2020 Cubesat Developers Workshop Call for Papers

The Cubesat Developers Workshop for 2020 will be held May 4-6 at the Cal Poly Performing Arts Center in San Luis Obispo, Calif. The planning team has announced a call for abstracts. All abstract and poster applications will need to be submitted using the online submission form by Friday, January 10, 2020. For more information, visit http://www.cubesat.org/workshop-information

[ANS thanks The CubeSat Workshop Team for the above information]

Donate to AMSAT Tax-Free From Your IRA

Are you over 70-1/2 years of age and need to meet your IRA’s Required Minimum Distribution for 2019? Consider making a donation to AMSAT!

Under the Protecting Americans from Tax Hikes Act of 2015, individuals over 70-1/2 years of age may make direct transfers of up to $100,000 per year from a traditional IRA to an eligible charity without increasing their taxable income. Consult your tax advisor or accountant to make certain you are eligible.

AMSAT is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit educational and scientific organization whose purpose is to design, construct, launch, and operate satellites in space and to provide the support needed to encourage amateurs to utilize these resources. AMSAT’s federal tax ID is 52-0888529.

Second Batch of 50th Anniversary “Friends of 50” Certificates Sent

A second batch of 50th Anniversary AMSAT “Satellite Friends of 50 Award” certificates went out in the mail on Wednesday, November 6. Chances are you may have already qualified for this award! The requirement is to make satellite contacts with 50 amateur radio operators on 50 differenton days during the anniversary year of 2019.(limit of 1 contact per day counted toward the award). For details, see: https://amsat.org/amsat-50th-anniversary-awards-program/

[ANS thanks Robert Bankston, KE4AL for the above information.]

Need new satellite antennas? Purchase Arrows, Alaskan Arrows, and M2 LEO-Packs
from the AMSAT Store. When you purchase through AMSAT, a portion of the proceeds
goes towards Keeping Amateur Radio in Space.
https://amsat.org/product-category/hardware/

AMSAT Seeks Digital Communications Team Members

AMSAT is in the process of redesigning its website and is looking to immediately fill key volunteer member additions to its digital communications team.  Available positions include a Webmaster, Content Managers, and an Online Store Co-Manager.  Candidates must have experience with Word press and be a current AMSAT member.

Webmaster:

The Webmaster works as an integral member of the AMSAT Digital Communications Team in planning, organizing, implementing, and supporting strategic web technologies.  Under minimal supervision, the Webmaster collaborates with the Digital Communications team and AMSAT Development to facilitate ongoing content creation, development of standards, and overall management of AMSAT’s website and member portal.  The primary objectives of the Webmaster are to ensure that AMSAT’s digital presence accurately portrays the character, quality and heritage of AMSAT, provide an efficient user experience, and serve to increase recruitment and financial contributions.

Web Content Managers:

Web Content Managers ensure AMSAT’s website and webpages follow best content practices and meet the diverse needs of internal and external customers.  As part of the AMSAT Digital Communications Team, Website Content Managers must understand the organizational needs, map them to the end-user needs and work with applicable AMSAT departments to create content strategy and plan for individual webpages.

Online Store Co-Manager:

The Online Store Co-Manager updates and refreshes the AMSAT Store when new merchandise becomes available, deletes merchandise when no longer available, and updates pricing and shipping information when necessary.  Experience in WooCommerce is required.

If you want to be a part of the solution in delivering the quality web services AMSAT members deserve, we could sure use your help.

Please contact the AMSAT VP of User Services at ke4al (at) yahoo (dot) com.

[ANS thanks Robert Bankston, KE4AL for the above information.]

Purchase AMSAT Gear on our Zazzle storefront.
25% of the purchase price of each product goes
towards Keeping Amateur Radio in Space
 https://www.zazzle.com/amsat_gear

NO-83 (BRICSAT-P) Nears Re-Entry

NO-83 (BRICSAT-P, CAT ID 40655) is nearing decay from orbit. Alan Biddle, WA4SCA, has run the TLEs through the SATEVO software and a re-entry is possible on November 9, 2019. TLEs for NO-83 remain in this week’s TLE distribution.

[ANS thanks Ray Hoad, WA5QGD, for the above information]

Upcoming ARISS Contact Schedule

An International Space Station school contact has been planned with participants at “Alcide De Gasperi” Secondary School: Part Of The Istituto Comprensivo Statale “E. L. Corner”, Vigonovo, Italy and Istituto Comprensivo Di Pederobba, Onigo Di Pederobba, Italy on 11 November. The event is scheduled to begin at approximately 10:10 UTC. It is recommended that you start listening approximately 10 minutes before this time. The duration of the contact is approximately 9 minutes and 30 seconds. The contact will be a telebridge between NA1SS and VK6MJ. The contact should be audible over Australia and adjacent areas. Interested parties are invited to listen in on the 145.80 MHz downlink. The contact is expected to be conducted in Italian. Watch for live stream from Vigonovo at https://tinyurl.com/y2n3eojw and from Pederobba at https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCLRZahLgMma_2ngllrj9iVg .

An International Space Station school contact has been planned with participants at European High School – Brindisi, Brindisi, Italy and I.I.S.S. “Majorana – Laterza”, Putignano, Italy on 13 Nov. The event is scheduled to begin at approximately 09:18 UTC. It is recommended that you start listening approximately 10 minutes before this time. The duration of the contact is approximately 9 minutes and 30 seconds. The contact will be a telebridge between NA1SS and K6DUE. The contact should be audible over the east coast of the U.S. Interested parties are invited to listen in on the 145.80 MHz downlink. The contact is expected to be conducted in Italian.

A reminder that the deadline to submit proposals for ARISS contacts to be scheduled between July 1, 2020 and December 31, 2020 is coming up on November 30, 2019. For more information visit https://www.ariss.org/

[ANS thanks Charlie Sufana, AJ9N, and David Jordan, AA4KN, ARISS operation team members, for the above information]

AMSAT, along with our ARISS partners, is developing an amateur radio package,
including two-way communication capability, to be carried on-board Gateway in
lunar orbit. Support AMSAT’s projects today at https://www.amsat.org/donate/ 

Upcoming Satellite Operations

  • Big Bend National Park, TX (DL89) November 10-11, 2019 
    Glenn, AA5PK, is taking a trip down to Big Bend National Park in South Texas and will operate from DL89 on Monday November 11th.  In addition, Glenn will be transitioning through DM81 (a few good morning passes) on the way there and staying in DM80 Sunday night.  Watch Glenn’s Twitter feed for any pass announcements:  https://twitter.com/AA5PK.
  • Nunavut, Canada (ER60) November 11 – December 6, 2019
    Look for VY0ERC to once again be active from the Eureka Weather station (NA-008, Zone 2) between Nov. 11 to Dec. 6. This station is operated by the Eureka Amateur Radio Club [probably the most northerly located amateur radio club in the world] from Eureka, Nunavut. The suggested bands are 40 and 20 meters (possibly 80m), as well as FM satellites (from ER60, EQ79) using SSB, the Digital modes and very slow CW. Activity will be limited to their spare time. QSL via M0OXO, OQRS or direct. For updates, see: https://twitter.com/vy0erc
  • EA9 Melilla (IM85) November 18-21, 2019
    Philippe, EA4NF, will be operating from Melilla as EA9/EA4NF from November 18 to 21, 2019. This very small Spanish territory located in Northern Africa, which is a very rare GRID and is listed as one of the Most Wanted SAT DXCC. Updates and passes on Philippe’s Twitter:  https://twitter.com/EA4NF_SAT 
  • New River Gorge National River, WV (EM98) November 21-24, 2019
    Michael, N4DCW, is visiting New River Gorge National River (with sat gear) and a swing through EM97 on his way home.  Watch for further announcements on Michael’s Twitter feed:  https://twitter.com/MWimages
  • Key West (EL94) December 3-6, 2019
    Tanner, W9TWJ, will be vacationing in Key West December 3-6. Key word is vacation, but he will jump on some FM satellite passes to activate EL94 for those that need it or just want to chat. Watch Tanner’s Twitter feed for further announcements: https://twitter.com/twjones85
  • Hawaii (BK19, BK28, BK29, BL20) December 21-28, 2019
    Alex, N7AGF, is heading back to Hawaii over Christmas. This will be a holiday-style activation, with special emphasis on the grid that got away – BK28. Keep an eye on Alex’s Twitter feed for further announcements: https://twitter.com/N7AGF

Please submit any additions or corrections to ke4al (at) amsat.org

[ANS thanks Robert Bankston, KE4AL for the above information.]

Satellite Shorts From All Over

  • This week begins the 20th year of continuous human presence living off-planet aboard the International Space Station. NASA and its partners have successfully supported humans living in space since the Expedition 1 crew arrived Nov. 2, 2000. A truly global endeavor, the unique microgravity laboratory has hosted 239 people from 19 countries, more than 2,600 experiments from 3,900 researchers in 107 countries, and a variety of  international and commercial spacecraft. (ANS thanks NASA for the above information)
  • Talks from this year’s PocketQube Workshop are now available at: https://tinyurl.com/y2fmszbl  Some slides are available here: http://www.albaorbital.com/3rd-pocketqube-workshop   (ANS thanks AMSAT-UK for the above information)
  • 27 videos from the Open Source Cubesat Workshop 2019 held in Athens Conservatoire in Athens, Greece are available for viewing: https://tinyurl.com/y6rd5pzn    The third edition of the workshop was hosted by Libre Space Foundation. (ANS thanks https://libre.space for the above information)
  • Radio amateurs in Sweden are limited to just 100 mW on 2.4 GHz. Yet an article by Christer, SM0NCL, shows how they can still send CW and SSB signals via the QO-100 / Es’hail-2 narrowband transponder! Read the article in Google English at https://tinyurl.com/AMSAT-SM  (ANS thanks Southgatearc.org for the above information)
  • Wonder why that downlink signal suddenly fades? Since launch of the amateur radio FUNcube-1 (AO-73) CubeSat in 2013 the team have observed the spin of the satellite based on the panel temperatures. The FUNcube team have speculated why the satellite spins up and down and occasionally flips the direction of spin. A fascinating explanation (without math!) of why satellites can flip as they spin can be found in a YouTube video at  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1VPfZ_XzisU&feature=emb_title  (ANS thanks R.L. Brunton, G4TUT, for the above information)
  • Hams like free stuff! So here’s a free PDF download of issue #87 of the MagPi magazine is available at: Raspberry Pi Weekly Issue #307  https://magpi.raspberrypi.org/issues/87
  • Celebrate #NationalSTEMDay with a @Virgin_Orbit community grant! Fall applications close on November 20, which means if you reach out now, you still have a chance to secure up to $2,500 cash for your local STEM education program. Apply at: https://t.co/FySZrXmrKe
  • Instead of searching many manufacturer sites or calling on companies to find and compare designs, now you can search for designs based on the circuit’s performance using Digi-Key’s Reference Design Library. New designs are being added weekly and improvements will be made based on user feedback: https://www.digikey.com/reference-designs/en
  • The 2019 AMSAT Symposium Proceedings USB flash drives, including the 2019 Proceedings and all previously published Proceedings dating back to 1986 are back in stock. Backorders will go out soon and more are available. To order, visit https://tinyurl.com/yxmnqxew
  • The AMSAT Symposium Engineering Update video is now available at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WWwvhuIaiBA&t=50s  (ANS thanks Paul Stoetzer, N8HM, AMSAT Executive VP, for the above information)

 

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the President’s Club. Members of the President’s Club, as sustaining donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive additional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT office.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the student rate for a maximum of six post-secondary years in this status. Contact Martha at the AMSAT office for additional student membership information.

73 and remember to help keep amateur radio in space,
This week’s ANS Editor,
Mark Johns, K0JM
K0JM at amsat dot org

ANS-307 AMSAT News Service Bulletins for November 3

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE
ANS-307

The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and information service of AMSAT, The Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in space including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building, launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio satellites.

The news feed on https://amsat.org publishes news of Amateur Radio in space as soon as our volunteers can post it. Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to: ans-editor at amsat dot org.  You can sign up for free e-mail delivery of the AMSAT News Service Bulletins via the ANS List; to join this list see:  https://www.amsat.org/mailman/listinfo/ans

In this edition:

  • HuskySat-1 Successfully Lifted into Space
  • ARISS Contact Opportunities – Call for Proposals
  • FoxTelem Version 1.08 Released
  • Fox-in-a-Box Upgrades for FoxTelem V 1.08
  • AMSAT Seeks Digital Communications Team Members
  • The 39th Annual ARRL and TAPR Digital Communications Conference Announced September 11-13, 2020, Charlotte, NC
  • VUCC Awards-Endorsements for October 2019
  • Upcoming Satellite Operations
  • ARISS News
  • Satellite Shorts from All Over

HuskySat-1 Successfully Lifted into Space

A Cygnus cargo spacecraft carrying the University of Washington’s HuskySat-1 was successfully launched atop a Northrop Grumman Antares rocket Saturday, November 2, 1459 UTC.

The Cygnus spacecraft will dock with the ISS on November 4.  Cygnus is then scheduled to depart the ISS on January 13, 2020 and raise its orbit to approximately 500 km where HuskySat-1 and SwampSat will be deployed.  After deployment, HuskySat-1’s 1200 bps BPSK beacon on 435.800 MHz should be active.(This beacon is decodable with the latest release of FoxTelem.)  HuskySat-1 is expected to run its primary mission (testing a pulsed plasma thruster and experimental 24 GHz data transmitter) for thirty days.  The satellite will then be turned over to AMSAT for Amateur Radio operation, featuring a 30 kHz wide 145 to 435 MHz linear transponder for SSB/CW communications.

For those interested in reading about HuskySat-1’s development and its science, read the UW News article at https://tinyurl.com/ANS-307-HuskySat-1

[ANS thanks SpaceNews.com, Paul Stoetzer, N8HM, and UW News for the above information.]

ARISS Contact Opportunities – Call for Proposals

  • Current Proposal Window is October 1, 2019 to November 30, 2019
  • Upcoming Proposal Window is February 1, 2020 to March 31, 2020

The Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) Program is seeking formal and informal education institutions and organizations, individually or working together, to host an Amateur Radio contact with a crew member on board the ISS.  ARISS anticipates that the contact for proposals submitted in the proposal window now open would be held between July 1, 2020 and December 31, 2020.  ARISS is happy to announce a second proposal window will open February 1, 2020 for contacts that would be held between January 1, 2021 and June 30, 2021.  Crew scheduling and ISS orbits will determine the exact contact dates.  To maximize these radio contact opportunities, ARISS is looking for organizations that will draw large numbers of participants and integrate the contact into a well-developed education plan.

The deadline to submit proposals for contacts between July 1, 2020 and December 31, 2020 is November 30, 2019.  The proposal window for contacts between January 1, 2021 and June 30, 2021 will open on February 1, 2020 and close on March 31, 2020.  Proposal information and documents can be found at www.ariss.org.

Information Webinars on November 7

Two ARISS Introductory Webinar sessions will be held on November 7, 2019. The first is at 6:00 PM ET and the second is at 9:00 PM ET. The same material will be covered during both sessions, so choose the session that best fits your schedule. The Eventbrite link to sign up is https://ariss-introductory-webinar-fall-2019.eventbrite.com .

The Opportunity

Crew members aboard the International Space Station will participate in scheduled Amateur Radio contacts. These radio contacts are approximately 10 minutes in length and allow students to interact with the astronauts through a question-and-answer session.

An ARISS contact is a voice-only communication opportunity via Amateur Radio between astronauts and cosmonauts aboard the space station and classrooms and communities. ARISS contacts afford education audiences the opportunity to learn firsthand from astronauts what it is like to live and work in space and to learn about space research conducted on the ISS. Students also will have an opportunity to learn about satellite communication, wireless technology, and radio science. Because of the nature of human spaceflight and the complexity of scheduling activities aboard the ISS, organizations must demonstrate flexibility to accommodate changes in dates and times of the radio contact.

Amateur Radio organizations around the world with the support of NASA and space agencies in Russia, Canada, Japan and Europe present educational organizations with this opportunity. The ham radio organizations’ volunteer efforts provide the equipment and operational support to enable communication between crew on the ISS and students around the world using Amateur Radio.

More Information

For proposal information and more details such as expectations, proposal guidelines and proposal form, and dates and times of Information Webinars, go to www.ariss.org.  Please direct any questions to ariss.us.education@gmail.com.

[ANS thanks Dave Jordan, AA4KN, ARISS PR for the above information.]

Video recordings of the 2019 AMSAT Space Symposium have been posted:
htps://www.facebook.com/pg/AMSATNA
(This page should be accessible to all)
The Foundations of AMSAT – 2019 AMSAT Space Symposium Banquet Panel
is posted at: https://youtu.be/bRmn4gjvuTI

FoxTelem Version 1.08 Released

Chris Thompson, G0KLA has released Version 1.08 of FoxTelem.  This release provides several enhancements and needed changes for FOX-1E and HuskySat, a partnership with the University of Washington.

Users will need to download this version to successfully decode data from the two new spacecraft which will transmit BPSK telemetry on 70cm.  (Chris suggests now is a good time to put up a 70cm antenna if you do not have one!)

After version 1.08p was released earlier this week, IC-9700 users immediately noticed difficulties.  Version 1.08r was immediately released.  Chris notes: ” There were two issues that prevented good decodes from the IC-9700:

  1. The IF output of the IC-9700 is not a true IQ signal and you have both a lower and upper sideband image.  One has the bits flipped upside down.  Historically FoxTelem has coped with the bits with either sense, even though only one is “correct”, so 1.07 decoded fine from the wrong image.  I had introduced a bug that meant the “bit flip” check was not run.  That code is back in.
  2. There was also an issue where the algorithm that finds the signal was not being run if SatPC32 position was being read.  That was a common configuration for IC-9700 owners, so it compounded the problem.  The code is now fixed.”

Key changes include the following:

  • PSK decoders are easier to select.
  • Automatically change the band from 2m to 70cm and the mode from FSK to PSK if needed (and enabled).
  • Allows default mode to be set for each spacecraft.
  • No longer overwrites the user settings (e.g. as max/min frequency) when spacecraft files are updated.
  • Saves the properties whenever they are changed (rather than just at exit).
  • Allows the user to change the display name for a spacecraft without changing the KEPS name.
  • Prevents FOXDB from being corrupted when power restarted.
  • Better memory management so that long running FoxTelem sessions do not end up out of memory.
  • Allows MAX and MIN records to be displayed in table on the telemetry tab.
  • Shows the Capture Date for the record being displayed (e.g. RT,  MAX, MIN).
  • Deletes existing files when server data is downloaded.
  • Ties the STP date more accurately to the position of the SYNC word in the bit buffer to avoid stamping frames with the same date.
  • Many small bugs and crashes fixed.

A full list of changes can be found at https://github.com/ac2cz/FoxTelem/milestone/15?closed=1

You can download the new release at

Feel free to email Chris with any questions, suggestions or bug reports to chrisethompson at gmail dot com.

[ANS thanks Chris E. Thompson, G0KLA for the above information.]

The 2019 AMSAT Symposium Proceedings USB flash drives, featuring
1.98 GB of information, including the 2019
Proceedings and all previously
published Proceedings
dating back to 1986 are now available on the AMSAT store
https://tinyurl.com/ANS-300-Symposium-Flash-Drive
(allow 10 business days for the next batch to be loaded with the files)

Fox-in-a-Box Upgrades for FoxTelem V 1.08

In addition to Chris Thompson’s announcement.  Burns Fisher, WB1FJ reports that version of FoxTelem has been tested on Fox-in-a-Box installations (FoxTelem running on a Raspberry Pi).  Starting immediately with serial number 110, FoxTelem Version 1.08p will be included on the SD cards that are ordered from the AMSAT store.  (It is not yet on the download file.)

If you have a Fox-in-a-Box with an older version and you wish to upgrade it (highly recommended) follow these steps:

  1. Download the 1.08 linux tar.gz  from http://amsat.us/FoxTelem/linux/to the Desktop using the browser on your FIAB.
  2. Double-click the file to extract it to a directory(folder) named “FoxTelem_1.08p_linux”.
  3. Next, stop the running FoxTelem and edit the file on your desktop named “StartFoxTelem”. (Right-click and choose Text Editor.)
  4. About the third line from the bottom, change “foxtelem_1.07_linux” to “FoxTelem_1.08p_linux”. (Be sure the capital letters are right.)
  5. Exit from the editor and double-click on “StartFoxTelem” and chose “Execute”.
  6. The new FoxTelem will start running and, as described in the manual you will start getting questions about whether you want to upgrade.  Say yes to each question.

After FoxTelem has started successfully, you should be all set, and FoxTelem should start automatically every time your reboot. If you have any issues, please Burns know at wb1fj at amsat dot org.

[ANS thanks Burns Fisher, WB1FJ for the above information.]

Need new satellite antennas? Purchase Arrows, Alaskan Arrows, and M2 LEO-Packs
from the AMSAT Store. When you purchase through AMSAT, a portion of the proceeds
goes towards Keeping Amateur Radio in Space.
https://amsat.org/product-category/hardware/

AMSAT Seeks Digital Communications Team Members

AMSAT is in the process of redesigning its website and is looking to immediately fill key volunteer member additions to its digital communications team.  Available positions include a Webmaster, Content Managers, and an Online Store Co-Manager.  Candidates must have experience with Word press and be a current AMSAT member.

Webmaster:

The Webmaster works as an integral member of the AMSAT Digital Communications Team in planning, organizing, implementing, and supporting strategic web technologies.  Under minimal supervision, the Webmaster collaborates with the Digital Communications team and AMSAT Development to facilitate ongoing content creation, development of standards, and overall management of AMSAT’s website and member portal.  The primary objectives of the Webmaster are to ensure that AMSAT’s digital presence accurately portrays the character, quality and heritage of AMSAT, provide an efficient user experience, and serve to increase recruitment and financial contributions.

Web Content Managers:

Web Content Managers ensure AMSAT’s website and webpages follow best content practices and meet the diverse needs of internal and external customers.  As part of the AMSAT Digital Communications Team, Website Content Managers must understand the organizational needs, map them to the end-user needs and work with applicable AMSAT departments to create content strategy and plan for individual webpages.

Online Store Co-Manager:

The Online Store Co-Manager updates and refreshes the AMSAT Store when new merchandise becomes available, deletes merchandise when no longer available, and updates pricing and shipping information when necessary.  Experience in WooCommerce is required.

If you want to be a part of the solution in delivering the quality web services AMSAT members deserve, we could sure use your help.

Please contact the AMSAT VP of User Services at ke4al (at) yahoo (dot) com.

[ANS thanks Robert Bankston, KE4AL for the above information.]

AMSAT, along with our ARISS partners, is developing an amateur radio package,
including two-way communication capability, to be carried on-board Gateway in
lunar orbit. Support AMSAT’s projects today at https://www.amsat.org/donate/ 

The 39th Annual ARRL and TAPR Digital Communications Conference Announced September 11-13, 2020, Charlotte, NC

Mark your calendar and start making plans to attend the premier technical conference of the year, the 39th Annual ARRL and TAPR Digital Communications Conference to be held September 11-13, 2020 in Charlotte, NC. The conference location is the Renaissance Charlotte Suites.

The ARRL and TAPR Digital Communications Conference is an international forum for radio amateurs to meet, publish their work, and present new ideas and techniques. Presenters and attendees will have the opportunity to exchange ideas and learn about recent hardware and software advances, theories, experimental results, and practical applications.

Topics include, but are not limited to: Software Defined Radio (SDR), digital voice , digital satellite communications, Global Position System (GPS), precision timing, Automatic Packet Reporting System(tm)(APRS), short messaging (a mode of APRS), Digital Signal Processing (DSP), HF digital modes, Internet interoperability with Amateur Radio networks, spread spectrum, IEEE 802.11 and other Part 15 license-exempt systems adaptable for Amateur Radio, using TCP/IP networking over Amateur Radio, mesh and peer to peer wireless networking, emergency and Homeland Defense backup digital communications, using Linux in Amateur Radio, updates on AX.25 and other wireless networking protocols.

Complete conference details including registration information, call for papers and preliminary agenda can be seen at https://www.tapr.org/dcc

[ANS thanks TAPR for the above information.]

VUCC Awards-Endorsements for October 2019

Here are the endorsements and new VUCC Satellite Awards issued by the ARRL for the period October 1, 2019 through November 1, 2019. Congratulations to all those who made the list this month!

CallsignSeptember 2019 VUCC StandingOctober 2019 VUCC Standing
W5RKN675694
N0JE569637
K9UO475500
W5TD384392
AC9E352353
HP2VX300351
AD0HJ325350
K5IX325350
W7JSD309336
G0IIQ112251
ND0C200250
WB8TGYNew210
N4DCWNew
201
KC9VGG127200
NX2X119178
KC9UQR132172
W0NBC137152
VE1VOXNew126
N4QX120125
AA0MZ102112
WA9JBQNew104
N9FNNew103
PU8MGBNew102
KI4USNew101
AB4GENew100
N0RCNew100
S57NMLNew100
W2ASCNew100

If you find errors or omissions. please contact me off-list at <mycall>@<mycall>.com and I’ll revise the announcement. This list was developed by comparing the ARRL .pdf listings for the two months. It’s a visual comparison so omissions are possible. Apologies if your call was not mentioned. Thanks to all those who are roving to grids that are rarely on the birds. They are doing most of the work!

[ANS thanks Ron Parsons, W5RKN for the above information.]

Upcoming Satellite Operations

  • South TX (EL0x and EL1x) November 2-9, 2019
    Ron, AD0DX, will be vacationing in McAllen TX area the week of Nov 2 to 9. He will be roving to south Texas on the above dates. His current plan is as follows:Sat Nov 2nd: EL08/EL09 probably one pass per grid starting in the late afternoon local Sun Nov 3: EL17/EL18 holiday style, one or two passes per grid Mon Nov 4 through Fri Nov 8: EL06 / EL15 / EL16. He is staying in EL06 and will activate 15 and 16 a few times throughout the week. Will probably activate EL06 4 or 5 times. Sat Nov 9: EL07 / EL08 Probably one pass from each grid. He will be active on FM and linear satellites and will tweet passes from https://twitter.com/ad0dx
  • EM68/69 November 3-5, 2019
    Tanner, W9TWJ, will be vacationing in Illinois, November 3–5. Key word is vacation, but he will jump over to activate the EM68/EM69 gridline on FM satellites. Watch Tanner’s Twitter feed for further announcements: https://twitter.com/twjones85 
  • Nunavut, Canada (ER60) November 11 – December 6, 2019
    Look for VY0ERC to once again be active from the Eureka Weather station (NA-008, Zone 2) between Nov. 11 to Dec. 6. This station is operated by the Eureka Amateur Radio Club [probably the most northerly located amateur radio club in the world] from Eureka, Nunavut. The suggested bands are 40 and 20 meters (possibly 80m), as well as FM satellites (from ER60, EQ79) using SSB, the Digital modes and very slow CW. Activity will be limited to their spare time. QSL via M0OXO, OQRS or direct. For updates, see: https://twitter.com/vy0erc
  • EA9 Melilla (IM85) November 18-21, 2019
    Philippe, EA4NF, will be operating from Melilla as EA9/EA4NF from November 18 to 21, 2019. This very small Spanish territory located in Northern Africa, which is a very rare GRID and is listed as one of the Most Wanted SAT DXCC. Updates and passes on Philippe’s Twitter:  https://twitter.com/EA4NF_SAT 
  • Key West (EL94) December 3-6, 2019
    Tanner, W9TWJ, will be vacationing in Key West December 3-6. Key word is vacation, but he will jump on some FM satellite passes to activate EL94 for those that need it or just want to chat. Watch Tanner’s Twitter feed for further announcements: https://twitter.com/twjones85
  • Hawaii (BK19, BK28, BK29, BL20) December 21-28, 2019
    Alex, N7AGF, is heading back to Hawaii over Christmas. This will be a holiday-style activation, with special emphasis on the grid that got away – BK28. Keep an eye on Alex’s Twitter feed for further announcements: https://twitter.com/N7AGF

Please submit any additions or corrections to ke4al (at) amsat.org

[ANS thanks Robert Bankston, KE4AL for the above information.]

The digital download version of the 2019 edition of
Getting Started with Amateur Satellites is now available as a
DRM-free PDF from the AMSAT Store. Get yours today!
https://tinyurl.com/ANS-237-Getting-Started

ARISS News

Completed Contacts

  • Farmwell Station Middle School Space Dreamers, Ashburn, VA, direct via K4LRG The ISS callsign was NA1SS. The scheduled astronaut was Drew Morgan KI5AAA. The contact was successful on October 29, 2019 at 15:01:27 UTC.

Upcoming Contacts

  • Private UKEB School, Izmir, Turkey, telebridge via K6DUE
    The ISS callsign is presently scheduled to be NA1SS.
    The scheduled astronaut is Luca Parmitano KF5KDP.
    Contact is go for Tuesday, November 5, 2029 at 12:34 UTC.
  • Istituto Comprensivo “G.B. Perasso”, Milano, Italy and Istituto Comprensivo Montignoso –
    Scuola secondaria I grado “G.B.Giorgini”, Montignoso, Italy Telebridge via VK5ZAI.
    The ISS callsign is presently scheduled to be NA1SS.
    The scheduled astronaut is Luca Parmitano KF5KDP.
    Contact is go for: Wednesday, November 6 2019 at 09:27:34 UTC.

[ANS thanks Charlie Sufana, AJ9N  for the above information.]

Shorts from All Over

  • Amazon Smile Purchases Add Up!
    AmazonSmile recently reported that the Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation received a quarterly donation of $280.92 thanks to customers shopping at smile.amazon.com.  To date, AmazonSmile has donated a total of $4,194.21 to AMSAT. [ANS thanks Dr. Thomas A Clark, K3IO for the above information.]
  • GNU Radio Conference Recordings Available
    The GNU Radio Conference was held September 16-20, 2019 at the Marriott at the Space & Rocket Center in Huntsville, Alabama.  A total of 41 talks across a variety of topics are now available on YouTube. The GNU Radio Conference staff thanks all the speakers for their participation.  View the  playlist of presentations at https://t.co/zjRYq7yjr1. [ANS thanks GNU Radio for the above information.]
  • Building a Raspberry Pi-Based SatNOGS Ground Station
    Corey Shields uses a Stegoboard 122 kit with the new Raspberry Pi4 to rebuild his ground station. What resulted is a pretty cool wall-mounted ground station.  Read the full article at https://tinyurl.com/ANS-307-Ground-Station   [ANS thanks Corey Shields for the above information.]
  •  News from the First Week of WRC Week 1
    The 2019 World Radiocommunication Conference in Sharm El-Sheikh, Egypt, November 1, 2019 saw agreement reached on several issues on which discussions prior to the conference had revealed consensus. Those were the easy ones; the rest will be more difficult.  Read the full report at https://tinyurl.com/ANS-307-WRC  [ANS thanks AMSAT-UK for the above information.]
  •  The Dzhanibekov Effect (Or, Tennis Racket Theorem) and AO-73
    Dave Johnson, G4DPZ, posted an analysis of the AO-73 rotation and flip.  Dave says, “We have speculated why the satellite spins up and down and occasionally flips the direction of spin. Recently Jason Flynn, G7OCD found a YouTube video that might explain the flip which introduces The Dzhanibekov Effect or Tennis Racket Theorem in regards to stability of rotating bodies (such as spacecraft).”  Read the article and watch the video at:
    https://groups.io/g/FUNcube/topic/40405577
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1VPfZ_XzisU  [ANS thanks Dave Johnson, G4DPZ for the above information.]
  •  Amateur Radio and Linux – A Beginners Guide Linux and Amateur Radio
    is a PDF presentation about Amateur Radio and Linux presented by : Dave Mamanakis, KD7GR. This presentation cover basic concepts of the open source operative system.  View the presentation at https://www.dxzone.com/qsy33663-linux-and-amateur-radio-presentation. [ANS thanks the DX Zone for the above information.]
  • Amateur Radio CubeSat Demonstration at Goddard, November 3, 2019
    The Goddard Amateur Radio Club members invite the public to see a demonstration of an Amateur Radio CubeSat simulator.  The simulator consists of a  solar/battery powered CubeSat that beacons telemetry data and a Raspberry Pi-based ground station that will receive and display the data in real time.  The club will also set up radio equipment and attempt to communicate with other hams across the country using amateur satellites as they pass overhead.  Club members will be on hand to explain the use of Amateur Radio satellites and equipment.  The event is open to the public from 12:00 to 4:00 PM. The Center is located at 9432 Greenbelt Rd, Greenbelt, MD 20771. [ANS thanks Patch.com for the above information.]
  • ESA Announces New ISS Opportunity for University Students
    ESA Education is inviting university student teams to submit proposals related to designing, building and operating an experiment that will be launched to the International Space Station and hosted inside the ICE Cubes facility for up to 4 months.  The deadline for letters of intent is December 1, 2019.  Full details can be seen at https://tinyurl.com/ANS-307-ESA-Opportunity  [ANS thanks ESA for the above information.]
  • CQ-DATV November Issue Available
    The November issue of CQ-DATV has arrived and is ready for downloading.  This month’s issue includes plans for a 70 cm, DVB-T, television repeater with a duplexer.  Download the free, complete issue at https://cq-datv.mobi/77.php  [ANS thanks CQ-DATV for the above information.]
  • Satellite: The “Go To” Solution for Resilient Emergency Response Communications 
    Independent from terrestrial and wireless infrastructure, satellite communications provide a secure and reliable solution that can be deployed quickly for disaster response or national emergencies.  A thorough analysis of why satellites can be useful in widespread emergency situations by a commercial provider.  Read the full story at http://www.satmagazine.com/story.php?number=1950983317. [ANS thanks SatMagazine for the above information.]

 

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the President’s Club. Members of the President’s Club, as sustaining donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive additional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT office.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the student rate for a maximum of six post-secondary years in this status. Contact Martha at the AMSAT office for additional student membership information.

73 and remember to behave and to help keep amateur radio in space,
This week’s ANS Editor,
Frank Karnauskas, N1UW
n1uw at amsat dot org