ANS-334 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins for November 29th

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE
ANS-334

The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and information service of AMSAT, The Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in Space including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building, launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio satellites.

The news feed on http://www.amsat.org publishes news of Amateur Radio in Space as soon as our volunteers can post it.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to: ans-editor at amsat.org.

You can sign up for free e-mail delivery of the AMSAT News Service Bulletins via the ANS List; to join this list see: http://www.amsat.org/mailman/listinfo/ans

In this edition:

  • Happy 7th Birthday AMSAT-OSCAR 73 (FUNcube-1)
  • Neutron-1 Signals Received
  • GridMaster Awards #20-#25 Issued
  • Changes to the AMSAT TLE Distribution for November 26th
  • ARISS News
  • Hamfests, Conventions, Maker Faires, and Other Events
  • Upcoming Satellite Operations
  • Satellite Shorts from All Over

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-334.01
ANS-334 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 334.01
From AMSAT HQ KENSINGTON, MD.
DATE November 29, 2020
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-334.01

Happy 7th Birthday AMSAT-OSCAR 73 (FUNcube-1)

AO-73 celebrated its 7th birthday in orbit last weekend.

Launched on November 21, 2013 at 07:10 UTC on a Dnepr rocket, FUNcube-1 was launched along with 31 other satellites, 19 of which carried amateur radio payloads.

With just a few resets over 7 years, the satellite continues in operation today.

Paul Stoetzer N8HM is sponsoring an award for contacts made via the satellite. The award aims to promote activity on AO-73.

73 on 73 Award

[ANS thanks AMSAT-UK for the above information]

Neutron-1 Signals Received

Following deployment from the ISS on November 5th, no signals were initially received from Neutron-1. Thanks to SatNOGS and the efforts of the amateur radio community, several beacons were eventually received and decoded. The HSFL team has concluded that the satellite is in a normally charging deep sleep mode.

The Neutron-1 sends a huge thank you to JA0CAW, VK2DWT, and all the other ham radio operators listening for the beacon! The team is working to decode the .wav files sent over.

Thanks to the beacon receptions, Neutron-1 has been identified as NORAD object 46923 and is now included in AMSAT’s TLE distribution.

More information about the Neutron-1 mission can be found at https://www.hsfl.hawaii.edu/

[ANS thanks the Hawaii Space Flight Laboratory for the above information]

Purchase AMSAT Gear on our Zazzle storefront.
25% of the purchase price of each product goes
towards Keeping Amateur Radio in Space
https://www.zazzle.com/amsat_gear

GridMaster Awards #20-#25 Issued

Recent roves have generated a number of applications for AMSAT’s GridMaster Award, including four applications on November 23rd.

20 Martin A. Schuette N9EAT November 1, 2020
21 Kevin Zari KK4YEL November 19, 2020
22 Robert Sours K9UO November 23, 2020
23 Chris Tabor K7TAB November 23, 2020
24 Paul Overn KE0PBR November 23, 2020
25 Casey Tucker KI7UNJ November 23, 2020

The GridMaster Award is AMSAT’s most prestigious operating award. This award was first introduced by Star Comm Group in 2014. AMSAT thanks Damon Runion, WA4HFN, and Rick Tillman, WA4NVM, for not only sponsoring this award since its inception, but, also, entrusting AMSAT with the honor of carrying on this important award for the benefit of the entire AMSAT community.

The GridMaster award is available to all amateurs worldwide who submit proof with written confirmation of contacts with each of the 488 maidenhead grids located within the contiguous United States of America.

[ANS thanks Bruce Paige, KK5DO, AMSAT Director of Contests and Awards for the above information]

Changes to the AMSAT TLE Distribution for November 26th

The following satellites have been and added to this week’s AMSAT-NA TLE Distribution:

BY70-3 – NORAD Cat ID 46839 – BY70-3 is not transmitting on its coordinated frequency of 437.443 MHz. BY70-3 is transmitting on an uncoordinated frequency of 437.600 MHZ. Thanks to Nico Janssen, PA0DLO, for verifying the NORAD Cat ID’s and transmitting frequencies for the above satellite.

Neutron-1 – NORAD Cat ID 46923.

The following satellites have decayed from orbit and have been removed from this week’s AMSAT-NA TLE Distribution:

UiTMSat 1 – NORAD Cat ID 43589 (Decayed on November 20, 2020 per Space-Track).
Maya 1 – NORAD Cat ID 43590 (Decayed on November 19, 2020 per Space-Track).

[ANS thanks Ray Hoad, WA5GQD, AMSAT Orbital Elements Manager for the above information]

AMSAT’s GOLF Program is about getting back to higher orbits, and it
all begins with GOLF-TEE – a technology demonstrator for deployable
solar panels, propulsion, and attitude control. Come along for the
ride. The journey will be worth it!

https://tinyurl.com/ANS-GOLF

ARISS News

Amur State University, Blagoveshchensk, Russia, direct via TBD

The ISS callsign is presently scheduled to be RSØISS
The downlink frequency is presently scheduled to be 145.800 MHz
The scheduled astronaut is Sergey Ryzhikov
Contact is go for Thu 2020-12-03 08:45 UTC

Scuola Secondaria di I grado “Anna Frank”, Pistoia, Italy, telebridge via IK1SLD

The ISS callsign is presently scheduled to be OR4ISS
The downlink frequency is presently scheduled to be 145.800 MHz
The scheduled astronaut is Victor Glover KI5BKC
Contact is go for: Fri 2020-12-04 12:25:22 UTC 50 deg

Tecumseh High School Electronics and Amateur Radio, Tecumseh, OK, direct via K5THS

The ISS callsign is presently scheduled to be NA1SS
The downlink frequency is presently scheduled to be 145.800 MHz
The scheduled astronaut is Shannon Walker KD5DXB
Contact is go for: Fri 2020-12-04 18:33:30 UTC 78 deg

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) is looking for Luther Burbank School alumni who participated in the ham radio contact on Dec. 21 2000, in relation to our 20th year Anniversary celebration. Please contact Charlie Sufana AJ9N at aj9n at aol.com for more info.

The latest information on the operation mode can be found at https://www.ariss.org/current-status-of-iss-stations.html

The latest list of frequencies in use can be found at https://www.ariss.org/contact-the-iss.html

[ANS thanks Charlie Sufana, AJ9N, ARISS Operations, for the above information]

Hamfests, Conventions, Maker Faires, and Other Events

Want to see AMSAT in action or learn more about amateur radio in space?

AMSAT Ambassadors provide presentations, demonstrate communicating through amateur satellites, and host information tables at club meetings, hamfests, conventions, maker faires, and other events.

No upcoming presentations listed

[ANS thanks Paul Overn, KE0PBR, for the above information]

Need new satellite antennas? Purchase Arrows, Alaskan Arrows,
and M2 LEO-Packs from the AMSAT Store. When you purchase through
AMSAT, a portion of the proceeds goes towards
Keeping Amateur Radio in Space.
https://amsat.org/product-category/hardware/

Upcoming Satellite Operations

No upcoming roves listed

Please submit any additions or corrections to ke0pbr at gmail.com

[ANS thanks Paul Overn, KE0PBR, for the above information]

AMSAT, along with our ARISS partners, is developing an amateur
radio package, including two-way communication capability, to
be carried on-board Gateway in lunar orbit.

Support AMSAT’s projects today at https://www.amsat.org/donate/

Satellite Shorts From All Over

  • Sean Kutzko, KX9X, has released his latest video on amateur satellite operation for DX Engineering. Follow along as he walks you through an entire linear satellite pass, complete with notes and annotations: https://youtu.be/cwtmP1sDL9g
  • A photo of AMSAT’s RadFxSat-2 / Fox-1E while it awaits integration is prominently featured in Virgin Orbit’s new blog post regarding the upcoming launch of LauncherOne: https://tinyurl.com/ANS-334-VO
  • The Wireless Institute of Australia is working on a plan to coordinate building Australian amateur radio satellites and has a a draft policy out for member review and comment: https://www.wia.org.au/newsevents/news/2020/20201121-1/index.php
  • Take a Trip to the Moon — and an Artemis Launch — with the Artemis Moon Pod Essay Contest! Take remote learning a little further — as in 250,000 miles further. NASA collaborated with Future Engineers to create the Artemis Moon Pod Essay Contest. The contest, open to U.S. students in grades K-12, launches on Tuesday, Sept. 15 and runs through Dec. 17, 2020, challenging participants to imagine leading a one-week expedition to the Moon’s South Pole. Just imagine: You and a crew of astronauts will explore the lunar surface, making discoveries to assist future explorers. Describe your team — the number of astronauts in your crew, the skills they possess, their personality traits, and the attributes you would want in crewmates. Next, what machine, piece of technology, or robot would you leave behind on the lunar surface to help future astronauts explore the Moon? To enter the contest, students must submit their essays by Dec 17. The essays will be divided into three groups, for judging by grade level – K-4, 5-8, and 9-12. Make sure to check out the full list of contest details, including that your essay should be no more than 100 words (grades K-4), 200 words (grades 5-8), or 300 words (grades 9-12). Students can sign up individually at the contest site or teachers can register their entire class. Every student who submits an essay will receive an official certificate and be invited to a NASA virtual event featuring an  astronaut! Semifinalists will be invited to represent their state or territory in a series of Artemis Explorer sessions with NASA experts. Nine finalists will have the opportunity to travel with a parent toNASA’s Johnson Space Center next summer to learn about lunar exploration. The national winner in each grade division will win a family trip to see the first Artemis flight test, watching the most-powerful rocket in the world launch from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. https://www.nasa.gov/feature/stem/artemis-essay-contest/ (NASA press release).
  • Several new products are available on the AMSAT Zazzle store, including a set of coasters, a watch, a t-shirt featuring the AMSAT round logo, and more. Check out the new items! 25% of the purchase price goes towards Keeping Amateur Radio in Space. https://www.zazzle.com/amsat_gear
  • AMSAT Remove Before Flight keychains are again available on the AMSAT store. Purchases help Keep Amateur Radio in Space! https://www.amsat.org/product/amsat-remove-before-flight-keychain/
  • All issues of The AMSAT Journal dating back to 2014 are now available to AMSAT members on AMSAT’s new membership portal. The 1969-2013 archive will be added at a later date. All editions of AMSAT’s Symposium Proceedings are also available for members. If you’re a current AMSAT member, get logged on today. If you are not yet a member, consider joining today at https://launch.amsat.org/
  • The 2020 edition of AMSAT’s Getting Started with Amateur Satellites is now available on the AMSAT store. A perennial favorite, Getting Started is updated every year with the latest amateur satellite information, and is the premier primer of satellite operation. The book is presented in DRM-free PDF format, in full color, and covers all aspects of making your first contacts on a ham radio satellite. The digital download is available for $15 at https://tinyurl.com/2020GettingStarted. The print edition is $30 plus shipping and is available at https://tinyurl.com/GS2020Print

/EX

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the President’s Club. Members of the President’s Club, as sustaining donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive additional benefits. President’s Club donations may be made at https://tinyurl.com/ANS-PresClub.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the student rate for a maximum of 6 post-secondary years in this status.

Join AMSAT today at https://launch.amsat.org/

73 and remember to help Keep Amateur Radio in Space,

This week’s ANS Editor,

Paul Stoetzer, N8HM
n8hm at amsat dot org

ANS-327 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins for November 22

The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and information service of AMSAT, The Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in Space including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building, launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio satellites.

The news feed on http://www.amsat.org publishes news of Amateur Radio in Space as soon as our volunteers can post it.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to: ans-editor@amsat.org

You can sign up for free e-mail delivery of the AMSAT News Service Bulletins via the ANS List; to join this list see: http://www.amsat.org/mailman/listinfo/ans

In this edition:

  • SpaceX Dragon Capsule Ferries Four Radio Amateurs to the ISS
  • September/October Issue Of The AMSAT Journal Is Now Available
  • New Launch Date for EASAT-2 and Hades Satellites
  • Arecibo Observatory Faces Demolition After Cable Failures
  • DX Portable Operation Planned From Thailand Grid NK99
  • Human Error Blamed For Vega Launch Failure
  • Changes to AMSAT-NA TLE Distribution for November 19
  • Moscow Aviation Institute Plans SSTV Event from ISS
  • ARISS News * Upcoming Satellite Operations
  • Hamfests, Conventions, Maker Faires, and Other Events
  • Satellite Shorts From All Over

 

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-327.01
ANS-327 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 327.01
From AMSAT HQ KENSINGTON, MD.
DATE 2020 November 22
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-327.01

SpaceX Dragon Capsule Ferries Four Radio Amateurs to the ISS

A SpaceX Dragon capsule carrying four radio amateurs autonomously docked on November 17 at 0401 UTC with the International Space Station (ISS). A SpaceX Falcon 9 launcher carrying the precious payload went into space on Sunday, November 15, from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center. They comprise the ISS Expedition 64/65 crew.

“Well, the ISS is loaded with hams now,” Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) US Delegate for ARRL Rosalie White, K1STO, said on Tuesday. “These four arrived very early this morning Eastern Time: NASA astronauts Victor Glover, KI5BKC; Mike Hopkins, KF5LJG, and Shannon Walker, KD5DXB, as well as Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) astronaut Soichi Noguchi, KD5TVP.” This marks Glover’s first time in space. The others all are ISS veterans.

Earlier this year, NASA ISS Ham Project Coordinator Kenneth Ransom, N5VHO, held amateur radio licensing study sessions for Glover, who passed the Technician-class exam on August 20.

The four will remain on station until next spring. They joined Expedition 64 Commander Sergey Ryzhikov and Flight Engineer Sergey KudSverchkov of the Russian space agency Roscosmos, on the ISS.

White said all but Noguchi likely will take part in ARISS contacts with schools. White said the first school contact is tentatively scheduled for December 4 with Tecumseh High School in Oklahoma, home of the Tecumseh High School Amateur Radio Club, K5THS. She said the students have earned their ham licenses, and the club has built an antenna and is learning about satellites and circuits. Members of the South Canadian Amateur Radio Society of Norman, Oklahoma, are providing support and mentoring assistance.

The Sunday launch from Kennedy Space Center marked only the second crewed-flight for the SpaceX Crew Dragon, which became the first commercial vehicle to put humans into orbit when astronauts Doug Hurley and Bob Behnken, KE5GGX, launched in May, and NASA gave SpaceX the go for future such launches.

“The return of human spaceflight to the United States with one of the safest, most advanced systems ever built is a turning point for America’s future space exploration,” SpaceX claimed, “and it lays the groundwork for missions to the moon, Mars, and beyond.”

(ANS thanks ARRL for the above information)


Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the AMSAT office is closed until further notice. For details, please visit https://www.amsat.org/amsat-office-closed-until-further-notice/


September/October Issue Of The AMSAT Journal Is Now Available

The September/October 2020 issue of The AMSAT Journal is now available to members on AMSAT’s Member Portal (https://launch.amsat.org/)

The AMSAT Journal is a bi-monthly magazine for amateur radio in space enthusiasts, published by the Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation (AMSAT). Each issue is your source for hardware and software projects, technical tips, STEM initiatives, operational activities, and news from around the world.

Inside the Current Issue:

  • Apogee View Robert Bankston, KE4AL
  • Engineering Update – Jerry Buxton, N0JY
  • Educational Relations Update Alan Johnston, KU2Y
  • A Guide to the AMSAT CubeSatSim Alan Johnston, KU2Y; Pat Kilroy, N8PK; Jim McLaughlin, KI6ZUM; David White, WD6DRI
  • User Services Update – Robert Bankston, KE4AL
  • For Beginners — Amateur Radio Satellite Primer VII – Keith Baker, KB1SF/VA3KSF
  • A 3D-Printed Parasitic Lindenblad Antenna for 70 cm Times Two! Curt Laumann, K7ZOO; Zach Metzinger, N0ZGO
  • In Search of the Ultimate DX Scott Tilley, VE7TIL

[ANS thanks Paul Stoetzer, N8HM, AMSAT Executive VP, for the above information]


New Launch Date for EASAT-2 and Hades Satellites

AMSAT-EA President Felix Paez, EA4GQS, has announced the scheduled launch date for AMSAT-EA satellites EASAT-2 and HADES. Flying with SpaceX, the two nanosats are scheduled for launch on January 14, 2021. They have been already delivered and integrated on the Alba Orbital deployer.

The satellites have been configured to act as FM voice and FSK data repeaters and not as linear transponders as was the initial plan. In any case, they are believed to be the smallest satellites ever given such a function, as their size is only 7.5 x 5 x 5 cm.

Hades also flies a SSTV camera that will take and send pictures each 15 minutes. The camera module design is based on the one used in the PSAT2 satellite, adapted for AMSAT-EA by the Brno University of Technology.

Hades – FM voice repeater, callsign AM6SAT
uplink 145.925 MHz (no tone), downlink 436.888 MHz

EASAT-2 – FM voice repeater, callsign AM5SAT
uplink 145.875 MHz (no tone), downlink 436.666 MHz

Both satellites have also digitized FM voice beacons and FSK data repeaters.

These are the first satellites built by AMSAT-EA, with the project leaders being all Spanish radio amateurs and almost all the engineering made by radio amateurs with help of students of two universities. While AMSAT-EA doesn’t have the flight heritage of other AMSAT organizations, this is an important step for the organization as it moves to improve skills in order to build better satellites for the radio amateur satellite service in the future.

More information and photos of these and other upcoming AMSAT-EA projects is available at https://bit.ly/3lNjTJq

[ANS thanks AMSAT-EA for the above information]


Arecibo Observatory Faces Demolition After Cable Failures

After withstanding hurricanes and earthquakes, playing central roles in movies like “GoldenEye” and “Contact,” Puerto Rico’s famed Arecibo Observatory, once the largest radio telescope in the world, will be demolished because of cable failures that left its huge detector platform too unstable to attempt repairs.

“After reviewing the engineering assessment, we have found no path forward that would allow us to do so safely,” said Sean Jones, assistant director for the Mathematical and Physical Sciences Directorate at the National Science Foundation.

“We know that a delay in decision making leaves the entire facility at risk of an uncontrolled collapse, unnecessarily jeopardizing people and also the additional facilities.”

Operated by the NSF through the University of Central Florida, the iconic observatory is made up of a fixed 1,000-foot-wide dish antenna built into a bowl-like depression that reflects radio waves or radar beams to a 900-ton instrument platform suspended 450 feet above by cables stretching from three support towers.

For 57 years, the observatory has played a leading role observing deep space targets, bodies in the solar system and, using powerful lasers, the composition and behavior of Earth’s upper atmosphere.

But the beginning of the end came on Aug. 10 when an auxiliary cable installed in the 1990s pulled free of its socket on one support tower and crashed onto the dish below, ripping a 100-foot-long gash.

Engineers were developing repair plans when one of the main 3-inch-wide cables attached to the same tower unexpectedly snapped on Nov. 6, causing the instrument platform to tilt and putting additional stress on the remaining cables.

An analysis showed the cable failed in calm weather at about 60 percent of of its minimum breaking strength. Inspections of other cables showed fresh wire breaks and slippage in several auxiliary cable sockets that were added to the structure in the 1990s.

An engineering firm hired by the University of Central Florida to assess the structure concluded it would be unsafe to proceed with repairs. Even stress tests to determine the strength of the remaining cables could trigger a catastrophic collapse.

Instead, engineers recommended a controlled demolition, bringing down the suspended instrument platform in a way that will prevent damage to other structures at the periphery of the dish by making sure the towers themselves don’t collapse and by ensuring no cables whip into those structures.

“The telescope is at serious risk of an unexpected, uncontrolled collapse,” said Ralph Gaume, director of NSF’s Division of Astronomical Sciences. “According to engineering assessment, even attempted stabilization, or testing the table could result in accelerating the catastrophic failure.

“Engineers cannot tell us the safety margin of the structure, but they have advised NSF that the structure will collapse in the near future on its own.”

Plans for bringing down the instrument platform have not yet been finalized and it’s not yet known whether explosives will be used in a controlled demolition or whether it might be possible to somehow lower the platform to the dish below.

However it plays out, the 1,000-foot-wide telescope will essentially be destroyed. While the laser facility and visitor’s center will hopefully be preserved, the radio telescope itself will be no more.

[ANS thanks SpaceflightNow for the above information]


Need new satellite antennas? Purchase Arrows,
Alaskan Arrows, and M2 LEO-Packs from the AMSAT Store. When you purchase through
AMSAT, a portion of the proceeds goes towards
Keeping Amateur Radio in Space.
https://amsat.org/product-category/hardware/


DX Portable Operation Planned From Thailand Grid NK99

The Thailand’s Amateur Radio Satellite group (AMSAT-HS) has requested permission to establish a temporary station (DX portable) with the northern office of the NBTC, Thailand’s regulator, in Chiang Mai and Mae Hong Son (grid NK99) provinces in the north of Thailand during the period from November 26-28, 2020 to communicate via All LEO and MEO amateur radio satellites (including QO-100 NB) that pass over Thailand using the callsign HS0AJ/P of the Radio Amateur Society of Thailand under the Royal Patronage of His Majesty the King.

Hence we would like to notify all radio amateurs who would interested in contacting stations in Thailand on its northern border of this activity. Even if the angle is as low as 0 degrees please try to contact us. We hope to meet you on all satellites frequency then.

Operator by: E21EJC KoB and HS1JAN NaN

[ANS thanks Tanan Rangseeprom, HS1JAN, for the above information]


Human Error Blamed For Vega Launch Failure

Arianespace executives said Nov. 17 that the failure of a Vega launch the previous day was caused when the rocket’s upper stage tumbled out of control due to incorrectly installed cables in a control system.

In a call with reporters, Roland Lagier, chief technical officer of Arianespace, said the first three stages of the Vega rocket performed normally after liftoff from Kourou, French Guiana, at 8:52 p.m. Eastern Nov. 16. The Avum upper stage then separated and ignited its engine.

However, “straightaway after ignition” of the upper stage, he said, the vehicle started to tumble out of control. “This loss of control was permanent, inducing significant tumbling behavior, and then the trajectory started to deviate rapidly from the nominal one, leading to the loss of the mission.”

Analysis of the telemetry from the mission, along with data from the production of the vehicle, led them to conclude that cables to two thrust vector control actuators were inverted. Commands intended to go to one actuator went instead to the other, triggering the loss of control.

“This was clearly a production and quality issue, a series of human errors, and not a design one,” Lagier said.

The failure caused the loss of two spacecraft, the SEOSAT-Ingenio Earth observation satellite for Spain and the TARANIS satellite for France to study electromagnetic phenomena in the upper atmosphere. [No amateur satellites were involved -Ed.]

[ANS thanks SpaceNews for the above information]


Want to fly the colors on your own grid expedition?
Get your AMSAT car flag and other neat stuff
from our Zazzle store!
25% of the purchase price of each product goes towards
Keeping Amateur Radio in Space
https://www.zazzle.com/amsat_gear


Changes to AMSAT-NA TLE Distribution for November 19

The following satellites have been and added to this week’s AMSAT-NA TLE Distribution:

SALSAT NORAD Cat ID 46495.
Bobcat-1 NORAD Cat ID 46921.
SPOC NORAD Cat ID 46922.
Thanks to Nico Janssen, PA0DLO, for verfying the NORAD Cat ID’s for the above satellites.

The following satellite has decayed from orbit and has been removed from this week’s AMSAT-NA TLE Distribution:

BHUTAN 1 NORAD Cat ID 43591 (Decayed on November 18, 2020 per SpaceTrack)

[ANS thanks Ray Hoad, WA5QGD, AMSAT Orbital Elements Manager, for the above information]


Moscow Aviation Institute Plans SSTV Event from ISS

Rodolfo Parisio, IW2BSF, reports that a Slow-Scan Television (SSTV) transmission event from the International Space Station is currently scheduled to begin on Tuesday, Dec. 1 starting at 12:30 UTC, ending at 18:25 UTC, and again on Wednesday, Dec. 2 starting at 11:50 UTC and ending at 18:25 UTC.

Listen for SSTV signals to be downlinked at 145.800 MHz +/Doppler shift. The mode of transmission is expected to be PD 120. These times will allow for one pass over the Eastern USA near the end of the scheduled times. Received images of reasonable quality can be posted at the ARISS SSTV Gallery at https://www.spaceflightsoftware.com/ARISS_SSTV/

Future updates on this event will be posted @ARISS_status on Twitter.

[ANS thanks Rodolfo Parisio, IW2BSF, for the above information]


ARISS NEWS

Amateurs and others around the world may listen in on contacts between amateurs operating in schools and allowing students to interact with astronauts and cosmonauts aboard the International Space Station. The downlink frequency on which to listen is 145.800 MHz worldwide.

A school contact has been scheduled with Amur State University, Blagoveshchensk, Russia, direct via a ground station to be determined. This contact will be heard over Russian and other parts of Europe on 145.800 MHz on Thursday, Dec. 3 at 08:45 UTC The ISS callsign is presently scheduled to be RSØISS and the scheduled cosmonaut is Sergey Ryzhikov.

Welcome aboard to SpaceX-Crew 1 now on orbit! Victor Glover, KI5BKC, Mike Hopkins, KF5LJG, Soichi Noguchi, KD5TVP, and Shannon Walker, KD5DXB, have joined Kate Rubins, KG5FYJ, and the two cosmonauts, Sergey Ryzhikov and Sergey Kud-Sverchkov.

[ANS thanks Charlie Sufana, AJ9N, one of the ARISS operation team mentors for the above information]


AMSAT, along with our ARISS partners, is developing an amateur
radio package, including two-way communication capability,
to be carried on-board Gateway in lunar orbit.

Support AMSAT’s projects today at https://www.amsat.org/donate/


Upcoming Satellite Operations

Upcoming Roves — Quick Hits:

Watch Twitter, there are lots pop-up roves happening lately, and I can’t keep this page updated with all of them.

FM26/27/28, @N5BO With 6 days off coming up I’m trying to finalize some plans, but as of now I’m looking to head out late next week for the FM26/27/28 area, with a couple grid stops on the way up. I’m also looking at a possible detour on the way back home through the EM97 area. More to come…

KH67, 7Q7RU, AO-7, RS-44, QO-100, 11/11 thru 11/21.

Major Roves:

AD0HJ’s #CoronaReliefThanksgivingMegaRoveBlowout: Not seeing any major roves scheduled for the dates 11/21 – 11/27 so he will be heading south to green up some Kansas style grids starting Saturday evening. More details to come over the next few days: EN00,10: EM18/19 : EM08/DM99 : DM97/EM07 : DM96/EM06 : EM17/EM18 : EM29/EM39. A list of passes here: https://twitter.com/AD0HJ/status/1328883186139590656

Please submit any additions or corrections to Ke0pbr (at) gmail.com

[ANS thanks Paul Overn, KE0PBR, AMSAT rover page manager, for the above information]


Hamfests, Conventions, Maker Faires, and Other Events

Clint Bradford K6LCS has booked his “Work the FM Voice Satellites With Minimal Equipment” presentation for the clubs.

TBD – Antelope Valley (CA) ARC

TBD – A private presentation for a Boy Scout troop in Danville, Penn.

These will be Zoom presentations. Everyone is asked to update their copies of the Zoom application – by directly visiting Zoom.us.

Clint is conducting “working the easy satellites” sessions via Zoom on November 19, 2020 at 7pm Pacific. If you are interested in attending, please send him a private email for exact times and Zoom meeting number!

[ANS thanks Paul Overn, KE0PBR, AMSAT Events page manager, for the above information]


Satellite Shorts From All Over

+ Happy 7th birthday to AO-73, FUNcube-1, which was launched on November 21,2013. Congratulations to AMSAT-UK on the ongoing success of this project. (ANS thanks AMSAT-UK for the above information)

+ South Dublin Radio Club has uploaded its latest video to the club’s YouTube channel. The video was created for Science Week in collaboration with Dublin Maker & Science Foundation Ireland and is called “Signals from Outerspace! Make your own antenna to get images from Weather Satellites.” It is designed as a beginner’s radio project and instructs viewers on how to construct a very simple V-dipole for 137 MHz, demonstrating how it can be utilised along with a basic SDR and computer in order to decode images from NOAA Weather satellites. It’s available at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8doUGhNKzdY (ANS thanks Southgate ARC for the above information)

+ Sean Kutzko, KX9X, is creating a series of YouTube videos for the DX Engineering channel beginning with “How and Why to Get Started in Op erating Amateur Radio Satellites.” Later episodes build on the con cepts in the first. See the first episode at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vp7h4ikthDQ (ANS thanks Sean Kutzko, KX9X, for the above information)

+ APSS-1, a 1U CubeSat mission with deployable solar panels, built by The University of Auckland (New Zealand), Faculty of Engineering, was launched on November 20. The satellite is intended for monitoring of ionosphere activity and transmission of processed data to ground stations using a 9k6 GMSK AX 25 downlink on 435.100 MHz. APSS-1 will start transmitting 45 minutes after deployment, and will only beacon every 5 minutes initially. (ANS thanks Mark Jessop, VK5QI, for the above information)

+ The Rocket Lab flight that took APSS-1 to orbit (see immediately above) was notable because Rocket Lab says the first stage of its Electron launcher splashed down under parachute in the Pacific Ocean off New Zealand after firing into space with 30 small satellites, be coming only the second private company to return an orbital-class booster to Earth intact. The privately-developed Electron rocket has flown 16 times, including Thursday’s mission, but this was the first time an Electron rocket flew with parachutes to attempt a full series of descent maneuvers. (ANS thanks SpaceflightNow for the above information)

+ NASA “Scan” on Facebook has published a note about ARISS and its 20 years. Look for their post dated on November 16 at: https://www.facebook.com/NASASCaN and add a comment to let them know that we amateur radio ops are here and that it was great they had dedicated a post to ARISS and to all hams! (ANS thanks Fernando Casanova, EC1AME, for the above information)

+ Talks from the DEF CON event are available on YouTube, they include a number of amateur radio talks from the conference’s Ham Radio Village. Among the amateur radio talks is “Talking to Satellites” by Eric Escobar, KJ6OHH. See the playlist at: https://bit.ly/3fpuwzO (ANS thanks Southgate ARC for the above information)

+ Hawaii Space Flight Laboratory (HSFL) has updated TLEs for Neutron-1. HSFL appreciates the amateur community who have been listening for Neutron-1’s beacon, and wish to be notified of amateurs still listening for the beacon at n1-info@hsfl.hawaii.edu. The new TLEs and other bulletins may be found at https://www.hsfl.hawaii.edu/ (ANS thanks HSFL and JoAnne Maenpaa, K9JKM, for the above information)

+ Open Research Institute has announced AmbaSat Inspired Sensors as a formal ORI project. To read the proposal document, visit: https://bit.ly/2KrpcQZ The first work session expected December 2020 to May 2021 centered at Villanova University. The Principal Investi gator is Dr. Alan Johnston. (ANS thanks Michelle Thompson, W5NYV, AMSAT Board Member, for the above information)

+ Dave Johnson, G4DPZ, gave an online satellite talk to the Mid Ulster Amateur Radio Club on Nov. 10. The video is now available for every one to watch on YouTube. The talk covered the many amateur satellites in Low Earth Orbit that operate in the 145 MHz and 435 MHz satellite bands as well as the QO-100 geostationary satellite which uses the 2.4 GHz and 10 GHz bands. Also covered were the new Inter-Operable Radio System which has recently been installed in the ISS Columbus module and Gateway Amateur Radio Exploration (AREx). Watch it at: https://bit.ly/3pNKSXJ (ANS thanks AMSAT-UK for the above information)


/EX

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the President’s Club. Members of the President’s Club, as sustaining donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive additional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT Office.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the student rate for a maximum of 6 post-secondary years in this status. Contact Martha at the AMSAT Office for additional student membership information.

73 and Remember to help keep amateur radio in space, This week’s ANS Editor, Mark D. Johns, K0JM

k0jm at amsat dot org

 

ANS-320 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins for November 15th

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE
ANS-320

The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and infor- mation service of AMSAT, The Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in Space including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building, launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio satellites.

The news feed on http://www.amsat.org publishes news of Amateur Radio in Space as soon as our volunteers can post it.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to:

ans-editor@amsat.org

You can sign up for free e-mail delivery of the AMSAT News Service Bulletins via the ANS List; to join this list see:

http://www.amsat.org/mailman/listinfo/ans

In this edition:

  • Australian Space Communications Station To Feature Optical Data Transfer
  • WB4APR Seeking high power VHF stations for Leonids Meteor Shower
  • AMSAT Italia and Italian Space Agency ISS STEAM agreement
  • ORI sponsors the M17 VOCODER and hardware development
  • ARISS News
  • Upcoming Satellite Operations
  • Hamfests, Conventions, Maker Faires, and Other Events
  • Satellite Shorts From All Over
  • Tips for the New Operator

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-320.01
ANS-320 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins
AMSAT News Service Bulletin 320.01
From AMSAT HQ KENSINGTON, MD.
DATE 2020 November 15
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-320.01

Australian Space Communications Station Will Feature Optical Data Transfer

The University of Western Australia (UWA) is set to install an optical communications station capable of receiving high-speed data transmissions from space. The communications station will be able to receive data from spacecraft from anywhere between low-Earth orbit (between 100 miles and 620 miles above Earth’s surface) to as far away as the surface of the moon — some 240,000 miles away.

Astrophotonics Group Leader Dr. Sascha Schediwy at UWA and the International Centre for Radio Astronomy (ICRAR) said optical

Optical telescope at the University of Western Australia.

communications are an emerging alternative to radio waves and are expected to drastically improve data transfer capabilities from space.

“Most current space communications rely on radio waves — it’s the same technology that brought us the voice of Neil Armstrong when the Apollo 11 mission landed on the moon in 1969,” Schediwy said. “Free-space optical laser communications has several advantages over radio, including significantly faster data rates and hack-proof data transfer. It’s the next generation of space communications, and it’s likely to be how we’ll see high-definition footage of the first woman to walk on the moon.”

The $535,000 ground station will use a 0.7-meter observatory-grade optical telescope donated to ICRAR, which will be fitted with atmospheric noise suppression technology developed at the university. The Western Australian ground station will be a joint venture between the UWA Astrophotonics Group, the ARC Centre of Excellence for Engineered Quantum Systems (EQUS), and UK industry partner Goonhilly Earth Station, which handles data traffic and supports secure communications links for major satellite operators including Intelsat, Eutelsat, and SES Satellites.

Data from the station will be fed to Goonhilly’s supercomputer data center in Cornwall, England by high-speed fiber. It will form part of a larger Australasian network of optical stations, led by the Australian National University and supported by partners in South Australia and New Zealand.

EQUS Director Andrew White said the Western Australian ground station could be the first of its kind in the southern hemisphere and have additional applications in research in different fields.

Goonhilly Chief Executive Ian Jones said the initiative is driving satellite communications into the next generations of systems and technologies needed to support the “enormous” data volumes produced by space missions. “This data arises from science and other missions and, in the future, will come from lunar and Mars missions that involve remote operations, robotics, and AI,” Jones said. The ground station is expected to be operational from early 2021 and open for business later that year.

[ANS thanks Rick Lindquist, WW1ME, Editor of The ARRL Letter for the above information]

WB4APR Seeking high power VHF stations for Leonids Meteor Shower

Bob Bruninga, WB4APR is seeking a several AMSAT operators with beams and high power transmitters to join in a Meteor Shower experiment. Bob writes:

With the Leonids Meteor shower coming up after Midnight next Monday (Tues AM), maybe its time to have some fun with APRS again!

Last time we did this was 1998 and over 48 MS packets were seen over 500 to 600 miles on the APRS channel..  Here is the report:

http://aprs.org/APRS-docs/LEONIDS.TXT

This year I propose not a free-for-all but just a few HIGH power stations transmitting and everyone else in the country checks the next morning to see what they copied. Best TX stations are those with several hundred watts and a beam. Even one such station would be a great test, because on 144.39 we would have maybe 10,000 full time normal APRS stations as receivers. In retirement, I don’t have the power nor the beam.

Up to 15 TX stations with power capability > 100W and beams would participate. Beams would be pointed toward distant population centers. The 15 transmitting stations will be distributed in various parts of the country would TX a continuous keydown string of short packets for 15 seconds every minute. Special software and APRS ID’s will be used. Xmission will be on the 144.39 national APRS channel to maximize the number of people that might copy one.

Transmissions begin at midnight local time and runs to 6 AM only to minimize any interference to other operators. This will result in local reception within about 20 miles of the TX station, but since the packets have no path, they can only be heard in simplex range of a transmitter or via meteor scatter. If a meteor happens, someone within about 400 to 600 miles is likely capture it.  Because the APRS channel load in most areas is only a packet every 3 or 4 seconds and that gives everyone a receive window of 75% of the total slots available.  Even if the TX stations are not synchronized, it doesnt matter because a given meteor path only exists for a fraction of a second between two fixed 100 mile or so areas for that instant.

The 15 high power TX stations will send is about 30 copies of the APRS grid format in a single burst every minute. This burst would look like:

>GG##gg<CR>

>GG##gg<CR>

>GG##gg<CR>

>GG##gg<CR>

>GG##gg<CR>

>GG##gg<CR>

The TNC will concatenate probably seven to ten of these at a timel into dense packets with only a single TX delay, not 30 delays.

The TNC has UNPROTO set to simply “APRS” no path! And set to CONVErSE..

Adjust the number (30?) till the TX burst lasts 15 seconds each minute.

The result is a complete grid in only 200 milliseconds each.  Hopefully short enough so that occasionally one will get bounced somewhere by the extremely short meteor path bursts at VHF.

Point beam toward an area with a dense ham population that is at least 600 miles away. Vertical or Horizontal polarization will work.

The PARS IS will be from the range METEOR-1 through METEOR-15

RX stations will not need to do anything special.  Any APRS software should capture and decode and plot a grid report if received overnight.

For those who are interested, here is the 1998 experiment page:  http://aprs.org/meteors.html Look about 75% down the page for the map of the 1998 2m experiment.

[ANS thanks Bob Bruninga, WB4APR for the above information]

AMSAT Italia and Italian Space Agency ISS STEAM agreement

AMSAT Italia and ASI, the Italian Space Agency, have subscribed a three-year framework program for joint initiatives in the area of the scientific culture development with particular interest in the aerospace field. The agreement also aims to develop interest of new generations in the STEAM disciplines: Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Mathematics. In this framework AMSAT Italia will propose the Agency project with particular technical relevance and high dissemination value for a joint technical feasibility and, as national reference for the ARISS project, the association will involve ASI in the school contacts with the astronauts on board the ISS. On the other hand ASI will make available the resources at its operation centers for verification activities or test of devices developed for educational purposes. The

2020-2023 framework program subscription confirms the collaboration between the Agency and our Association already started in 2011. More on the event on the AMSAT Italia web site <http://www.amsat.it> (in italian).

[ANS thanks Fabrizio Carrai, IU5GEZ of AMSAT Italia for the above information]

ORI sponsors the M17 VOCODER and hardware development.

Open Research Institute is proud to formally sponsor M17, an open source digital radio protocol, code, voice codec, and hardware project. The designs and technology are highly useful for digital radio uplinks for a wide variety of amateur satellite projects. The project is dynamic, international, accessible, modern, and welcoming. Open Research Institute is a 501(c)(3) dedicated to open source research and development for the amateur radio satellite service and beyond. Find out more at https://openresearch.institute

Learn about M17 and get involved at https://m17project.org/

[ANS thanks Michelle Thompson W5NYV, CEO Open Research Institute for the above information]

     Need new satellite antennas? Purchase Arrows, Alaskan Arrows,
    and M2 LEO-Packs from the AMSAT Store. When you purchase through
           AMSAT, a portion of the proceeds goes towards
           Keeping Amateur Radio in Space.

           https://amsat.org/product-category/hardware/       

ARISS News

The latest information on the operation mode can be found at https://www.ariss.org/current-status-of-iss-stations.html

The latest list of frequencies in use can be found at https://www.ariss.org/contact-the-iss.html

A multi-point telebridge contact means that each student will be on the telebridge from their own home.

ARISS is very aware of the impact that COVID-19 is having on schools and the public in general.  As such, we may have last minute cancellations or postponements of school contacts.  As always, I will try to provide everyone with near-real-time updates. Watch for future COVID-19 related announcements at https://www.ariss.org/

The following schools have now been postponed or cancelled due to COVID-19:

Postponed: No new schools

Cancelled: No new schools

Note, all times are approximate.  It is recommended that you do your own orbital prediction or start listening about 10 minutes before the listed time.

All dates and times listed follow International Standard ISO 8601 date and time format YYYY-MM-DD HH:MM:SS

The complete schedule page has been updated as of 2020-11-10 16:00 UTC. (***) Here you will find a listing of all scheduled school contacts, and questions, other ISS related websites, IRLP and Echolink websites, and instructions for any contact that may be streamed live.

https://www.amsat.org/amsat/ariss/news/arissnews.rtf

https://www.amsat.org/amsat/ariss/news/arissnews.txt

The successful school list has been updated as of 2020-10-14 18:00 UTC.

https://www.amsat.org/amsat/ariss/news/Successful_ARISS_schools.rtf

The ARISS webpage is at https://www.ariss.org/. Note that there are links to other ARISS websites from this site.

The main page for Applying to Host a Scheduled Contact may be found at https://www.ariss.org/apply-to-host-an-ariss-contact.html

ARISS Contact Applications (United States)

The Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) Program is seeking formal and informal education institutions and organizations, individually or working together, to host an Amateur Radio contact with a crew member on board the ISS. ARISS anticipates that the contact would be held between July 1, 2021 and December 30,

  1. Crew scheduling and ISS orbits will determine the exact contact dates. To maximize these radio contact opportunities, ARISS is looking for organizations that will draw large numbers of participants and integrate the contact into a well-developed education plan.

The deadline to submit a proposal is November 24th, 2020. Proposal information and more details such as expectations, proposal guidelines and the proposal form can be found at www.ariss.org. An ARISS Introductory Webinar session will be held on October 8, 2020 at 8PM ET. The Eventbrite link to sign up is: https://ariss-proposal-webinar-fall-2020.eventbrite.com

The Opportunity

Crew members aboard the International Space Station will participate in scheduled Amateur Radio contacts. These radio contacts are approximately 10 minutes in length and allow students to interact with the astronauts through a question-and-answer session.

An ARISS contact is a voice-only communication opportunity via Amateur Radio between astronauts and cosmonauts aboard the space station and classrooms and communities. ARISS contacts afford education audiences the opportunity to learn firsthand from astronauts what it is like to live and work in space and to learn about space research conducted on the ISS. Students also will have an opportunity to learn about satellite communication, wireless technology, and radio science.

Because of the nature of human spaceflight and the complexity of scheduling activities aboard the ISS, organizations must demonstrate flexibility to accommodate changes in dates and times of the radio contact.

Amateur Radio organizations around the world with the support of NASA and space agencies in Russia, Canada, Japan and Europe present educational organizations with this opportunity. The ham radio organizations’ volunteer efforts provide the equipment and operational support to enable communication between crew on the ISS and students around the world using Amateur Radio.

Please direct any questions to ariss.us.education@gmail.com.

For future proposal information and more details such as expectations, proposal guidelines and proposal form, and dates and times of Information Webinars, go to www.ariss.org.

ARISS Contact Applications (Europe, Africa and the Middle East)

Schools and Youth organizations in Europe, Africa and the Middle East interested in setting up an ARISS radio contact with an astronaut on board the International Space Station are invited to submit an application from September to October and from February to April.

Please refer to details and the application form at www.ariss-eu.org/school-contacts.  Applications should be addressed by email to:  school.selection.manager@ariss-eu.org

ARISS Contact Applications (Canada, Central and South America, Asia and Australia and Russia)

Organizations outside the United States can apply for an ARISS contact by filling out an application.  Please direct questions to the appropriate regional representative listed below. If your country is not specifically listed, send your questions to the nearest ARISS Region listed. If you are unsure which address to use, please send your question to the ARISS-Canada representative; they will forward your question to the appropriate coordinator.

For the application, go to:  https://www.ariss.org/ariss-application.html.

ARISS-Canada and the Americas, except USA: Steve McFarlane, VE3TBD email to: ve3tbd@gmail.com

ARISS-Japan, Asia, Pacific and Australia: Satoshi Yasuda, 7M3TJZ email to: ariss@iaru-r3.org, Japan Amateur Radio League (JARL) https://www.jarl.org/

ARISS-Russia: Soyuz Radioljubitelei Rossii (SRR) https://srr.ru/

ARISS is always glad to receive listener reports for the above contacts.  ARISS thanks everyone in advance for their assistance.  Feel free to send your reports to aj9n@amsat.org or aj9n@aol.com.

Listen for the ISS on the downlink of 145.8Ø MHz unless otherwise noted.

ARISS congratulations the following mentors who have now mentored over 100 schools:

Francesco IKØWGF with 140

Satoshi 7M3TJZ with 138

Sergey RV3DR with 137

Gaston ON4WF with 123

The webpages listed below were all reviewed for accuracy. Out of date webpages were removed, and new ones have been added.  If there are additional ARISS websites I need to know about, please let me know.

Total number of ARISS ISS to earth school events is 1403.

Each school counts as 1 event.

Total number of ARISS ISS to earth school contacts is 1336.

Each contact may have multiple schools sharing the same time slot.

Total number of ARISS supported terrestrial contacts is 48.

The following US states and entities have never had an ARISS contact:

South Dakota, Wyoming, American Samoa, Guam, Northern Marianas Islands, and the Virgin Islands.

QSL information may be found at:

https://www.ariss.org/qsl-cards.html

ISS callsigns: DPØISS, IRØISS, NA1SS, OR4ISS, RSØISS

Frequency chart for packet, voice, and crossband repeater modes showing

Doppler correction as of 2005-07-29 04:00 UTC

https://www.amsat.org/amsat/ariss/news/ISS_frequencies_and_Doppler_correction.rtf

Check out the Zoho reports of the ARISS contacts

https://reports.zoho.com/ZDBDataSheetView.cc?DBID=412218000000020415

Exp. 63 now on orbit

Kate Rubins KG5FYJ

Sergey Ryzhikov

Sergey Kud-Sverchkov

About ARISS:

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) is a cooperative venture of international amateur radio societies and the space agencies that support the International Space Station (ISS).  In the United States, sponsors are the Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation (AMSAT), the American Radio Relay League (ARRL), the ISS National Lab and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The primary goal of ARISS is to promote exploration of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEAM) topics by organizing scheduled contacts via amateur radio between crew members aboard the ISS and students in classrooms or public forms. Before and during these radio contacts, students, educators, parents, and communities learn about space, space technologies, and amateur radio. For more information, see www.ariss.org.

73,

Charlie Sufana AJ9N

One of the ARISS operation team mentors

[ANS thanks Charlie Sufana, AJ9N, one of the ARISS operation team members for the above information]

    AMSAT, along with our ARISS partners, is developing an amateur
    radio package, including two-way communication capability, to
            be carried on-board Gateway in lunar orbit.

   Support AMSAT’s projects today at https://www.amsat.org/donate/

Upcoming Satellite Operations

Quick Hits:

Note: Watch Twitter, there are lots pop-up roves happening lately, and I can’t keep this page updated with all of them.

DM89, 11/14 @N6UA Saturday might just be a good day to rove. Thinking of DM89 east of Denver – either around Last Chance or Agate, CO.

KH67, 7Q7RU, AO-7, RS-44, QO-100, 11/11 thru 11/21.

BRAZIL BAHIA. Sandro Ribeiro PY1SAN and Claudio MARCelo PY1CMT are QRV on the QO-100 satellite (some opportunities AO-07, FO-29 or RS-44) using CW and SSB as ZX6BA from Prado (HH02) 13 to 15 November 2020. The activity will be in several HF bands too, using CW and FT8, portable Alex Loop Antenna with 5 watts. QSL via LoTW.

BRAZIL, ESPIRITO SANTO. Sandro Ribeiro PY1SAN and Claudio MARCelo PY1CMT are QRV on Satellite QO-100 (maybe AO-07, FO-29, RS-44) using CW and SSB as PR1S from Nova Almeida (GG99) from 16 to 18 November 2020. A activity will be in several HF bands too, using CW and FT8, portable Alex Loop Antenna with 5 watts. QSL via LoTW.

Major Roves:

Maine!!!!!!

@KL7TN will be in FN53/54/55/56/57/64/65/66/67 Nov 13-18. Details to follow.

Editor’s Note: Don’t forget to check out Paul Overn’s GridMasterHeatMap on Twitter: https://bit.ly/35kUqB3 and Blog at: https://bit.ly/3eOpYT4

Please submit any additions or corrections to KE0PBR (at) gmail.com

[ANS thanks Paul Overn, KE0PBR, AMSAT rover page manager, for the above information]

  Get your AMSAT car flag and other neat stuff
      from our Zazzle store!
        25% of the purchase price of each product goes
           towards Keeping Amateur Radio in Space

              https://www.zazzle.com/amsat_gear

Hamfests, Conventions, Maker Faires, and Other Events

Clint Bradford K6LCS has booked his “Work the FM Voice Satellites With Minimal Equipment” presentation for the clubs.

TBD – Antelope Valley (CA) ARC

TBD – A private presentation for a Boy Scout troop in Danville, Pennsylvania

These will be Zoom presentations. Everyone is asked to update their copies of the Zoom application – by directly visiting Zoom.us.

Clint will be conducting “working the easy satellites” sessions via Zoom on November 19, 2020 at 7pm Pacific. If you are interested in attending, please send him a private email for exact times and Zoom meeting number!

[ANS thanks Clint Bradford, K6CLS for the above information]

Satellite Shorts From All Over

Tausat receives frequency coordination approval

Tausat, a 3U CubeSat created by university students at Herzliya Science Center in Israel, received frequency coordination approval from  the International Amateur Radio Union (IARU) on November 12. It will  carry a U/V FM amateur radio transponder, as well as a 9k6 BPSK AX25  telemetry downlink. The builders are planning a JAXA deployment from  the ISS in February, 2021.

[ANS thanks IARU for the above information]

NASA Invites Public to Share Excitement of First Crew Rotation Flight on US Commercial Spacecraft

 NASA is inviting the public to take part in virtual activities and events ahead of the launch the agency’s SpaceX Crew-1  mission with astronauts to the International Space Station. This is the first crew rotation flight of the SpaceX Crew Dragon spacecraft on a Falcon 9 rocket following certification by NASA for regular flights to the space station as part of the agency’s Commercial Crew Program.

The launch is targeted for 7:27 p.m. EST Sunday, Nov. 15, from Launch Complex 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The Crew Dragon is scheduled to dock to the space station at 11:00 p.m. Monday, Nov. 16. Launch, prelaunch activities, and docking will air live on NASA Television and the agency’s website. https://www.nasa.gov/nasalive

Additional Information is available at: https://go.nasa.gov/38Aii5J

 [ANS thanks NASA for the above information]

Next Rocket Lab Launch Delayed

News Flash:
Launch delayed to November 19 UTC.
See: https://twitter.com/RocketLab/status/1327691418970644481

Previous announcement: The next Rocket Lab launch window is scheduled for November 15 UTC at 01:44 to 04:34. It’s is called “Return to Sender”. They are going to try to recover the first stage by capturing it by helicopter as it is descending.
See: https://www.rocketlabusa.com/missions/next-mission/

The payload is 30 cubesats, one of which (APSS-1) is a 1U student satellite from Auckland University. This one has a 9600 GMSK downlink in the 70CM band. The format and details are due to be published here in the next few days. https://apss.space.auckland.ac.nz/.

To balance the payloads, a 3D printer version of “Gnome Chompski” has been attached to the kick stage. See: https://twitter.com/RocketLab/status/1323335303008903170 Gabe Newell who made the Gnome is going to donate $1 to Starship Children’s Hospital for every person watching the launch live. For information about Starship Children’s Hospital, see: https://www.starship.org.nz

Editors Note: at time of 11/11/2020 draft, a group message from Mark Jessop, VK5QI indicated that APSS-1’s IARU frequency coordination request has not been completed: http://www.amsatuk.me.uk/iaru/formal_detail.php?serialnum=669
the

 [ANS thanks Terry Osborne ZL2BAC for passing along the above information]

NROL-101 Mission Targeting Nov. 13 due to Hurricane Eta

(Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla., Nov. 11, 2020) — Due to impending weather and escalation of Hurricane Eta, ULA is now targeting Friday, Nov. 13, at 5:13 p.m. EST (2213 UTC) for the launch of the NROL-101 mission for the National Reconnaissance Office. See https://bit.ly/35kiIeA for additional information.

[ANS thanks the ULA editors for the above information]

NASA extends the Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System mission (CYGNSS)

NASA has extended the Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System mission (CYGNSS) through 2023 with plans to revisit and possibly extend  the mission through 2026. The constellation of microsatellites designed, built and operated by Southwest Research Institute with the University of Michigan, has made history over the last three-plus years, penetrating thick clouds and heavy rains to accurately assess wind speeds and better understand hurricane intensification. The NASA senior review panel rated the mission extension proposal as excellent, based on the current health of the constellation of instruments, particularly considering the low-cost nature of the sensors.

 [ANS thanks Space Daily for the above information]

Starship “Fireworks” 11/11/2020

SpaceX fired up the three rocket engines of its Starship SN8 prototype for the second time last night at its testing facilities in Boca Chica, Texas.

The event was a powerful blast of orange smoke and flying sparks, as captured by onlookers on video. The video and additional information is available at https://bit.ly/3lmcSPD

 [ANS thanks futurism.com for the above information]

Russian Cosmonaut IIS spacewalk Wednesday 18 November, 2020

Two Russian cosmonauts are scheduled to go outside the International Space Station on Wednesday, Nov. 18, to conduct a spacewalk that will  initiate preparations for the arrival of a new Russian research module. Expedition 64 Commander Sergey Ryzhikov and Flight Engineer Sergey Kud-Sverchkov, both of the Russian space agency Roscosmos, will relocate an antenna from the Pirs docking compartment, to the Poisk module, the first in a series of tasks over the course of several spacewalks that will prepare Pirs for decommissioning, undocking, and disposal. The Earth-facing Pirs will be replaced by the new Russian Multipurpose Laboratory Module, named “Nauka,” Russian for “science,” which is being prepared for launch at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. The spacewalk is expected to last up to six hours. Live coverage of the Russian spacewalk will begin at 13:30z on NASA Television and the agency’s website. The spacewalk is expected to begin about 14:30Z.

 [ANS thanks NASA for the above information]

PSLV Launch – November 7th

A Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle lifted off Saturday, Nov. 7 with  India’s EOS 1 radar imaging satellite and nine rideshare payloads for  customers based in the United States, Luxembourg, and Lithuania. The  successful mission was India’s first launch in nearly a year due to  delays caused by the coronavirus pandemic. Also on Saturday, a new  four-stage rocket operated by the Chinese launch company Galactic Energy succeeded on its inaugural flight, delivering a data relay microsatellite to an orbit 300 miles above Earth.

 [ANS thanks SpaceflightNow for the above information]

Is Hawaii Spaceflight Lab’s Neutron-1 MIA?

After its release from the ISS, many satellite enthusiasts have listened for a signal from the Hawaii Spaceflight Lab’s Neutron-1 cubesat. Reports have not come flooding in. Shane Pule, KC3PPM shared an email with the UH-SFL with me that outlines a possible explanation:

Aloha Shane,
Thank you for this information, we appreciate you listening for Neutron-1. We haven’t been successful at contacting Neutron-1 yet. We have noticed a signal at 435.275MHz while tracking Neutron-1, and we are investigating this in the event that our signal is shifted by 25kHz. We are not sure what could have caused this, but there may be an issue with the SDR tuning onboard the spacecraft.
73,
Amber Imai-Hong

[ANS thanks Shane Pule, KC3PPM, for the above information]

Tips for the New Satellite Operator – Mobile Apps

This is the second of a what I hope to be a monthly New Satellite Operators Corner. I will offer AMSAT New Operator tips and links to AMSAT resources for new operators and posts from various interest groups where useful info is published. This weeks tip comes from Rick, WA6NDR via TH-D74A@groups.io. I hope you find this as useful as I have.

Jack, KD4IZ, Editor, AMSAT News Service. 

There are many websites, cell phone, and desktop apps available for tracking satellites and learning about launches. For the beginner, the choices are bewildering and everyone seems to have a favorite. There are many choices available for all operating systems to choose from. Scott Harvey, KA7FVV, has a very comprehensive website with links to a tremendous amount of great information. He does an excellent job of distilling the basics and presenting them along with some great “how to” information. See: https://bit.ly/3nwx6H9

Scott suggested a number of the rocket launch apps to me recently and I have been exploring them. He also suggested several tracking apps. I don’t have an opinion or a recommendation for any of them yet, but I would encourage you to join me in looking these over.

Of the launch apps I am looking over, the primary are Launchcraft, Spacelaunch, and Supercluster. All appear to be available for both iOS and Android devices and can be found on the respective “store” sites for each OS. They are news aggregation apps that focus on upcoming space launches as well as offering timetable and post-launch reports.

By the my next monthly report, I should be able to address them, but for those who are interested, have at it and tell me what you think. Please let me know if you find an app that is particularly useful.

[ANS thanks AMSAT Member Scott Harvey, KA7FVV for sharing this information and his website]

/EX

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the President’s Club. Members of the President’s Club, as sustaining donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive additional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT Office. Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the student rate for a maximum of 6 post-secondary years in this status. Contact Martha at the AMSAT Office for additional student membership information.

73 and Remember to help keep amateur radio in space,

This week’s ANS Editor,

Jack Spitznagel, KD4IZ

kd4iz at amsat dot org

ANS-313 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins for November 8th

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE
ANS-313

The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and information service of AMSAT North America, The Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation.  ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in space including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building, launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio satellites.

The news feed on http://amsat.org publishes news of Amateur Radio in space as soon as our volunteers can post it.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to: ans-editor at amsat dot org.

In this edition:

  • Neutron-1 Launched from the ISS
  • VUCC Awards-Endorsements for November 2020
  • AMSAT GridMaster Award
  • IARU Coordinates Frequencies for Six Satellites in October
  • ARISS Team Attends ISS National Lab Education Summit
  • Upcoming Satellite Operations
  • Hamfests, Conventions, Maker Faires, and Other Events
  • ARISS News
  • Satellite Shorts from All Over

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-313.01
ANS-313 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 313.01
From AMSAT HQ KENSINGTON, MD.
November 08, 2020
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-313.01

Neutron-1 Launched from the ISS

Hawaii’s first 3U CubeSat designed to detect neutrons was launched on November 5, 2020 by the ISS and is now in Low Earth Orbit.

The science payload, a small neutron detector developed by Arizona State University, will focus on measurements of low-energy secondary neutrons – a component of the LEO neutron environment.

For the first month and during the spacecraft commissioning phase, the beacon will transmit 1200bps BPSK every 60 seconds on the IARU coordinated  frequency of 435.300MHz . The Hawaii Space Flight Laboratory welcomes the worldwide Amateur Radio community to collect the beacons and forward them to n1-info@hsfl.hawaii.edu. The beacon format is now public and published at: https://tinyurl.com/ANS-313-Neutron1.

After the initial commissioning phase, Amateurs will be able to use the V/U FM repeater during available times and according to the available power budget. Stay tuned for more mission updates on their Twitter account @HSFLNeutron1 and their website: https://www.hsfl.hawaii.edu/missions/neutron-1/.

[ANS thanks the Hawaii Space Flight Laboratory for the above information.]

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the AMSAT office
is closed until further notice. For details, please visit
https://www.amsat.org/amsat-office-closed-until-further-notice/

VUCC Awards-Endorsements for November 2020

Here are the endorsements and new VUCC Satellite Awards issued by the ARRL for the period October 1, 2020 through November 1, 2020. Congratulations to all those who made the list this month!

CallOctNov
KO4MA17531779
N3GS652679
N0JE655675
KE4AL625631
K7TAB600627
WD9EWK(DM43)623625
KI7UNJ551576
N9FN450486
K0JM300403
N5BONew401
N4DCW300400
WA9JBQ355375
VE6WK207355
AK7DD255326
KS1G285325
KF6JOQ251303
W4DTA275301
N6RFM226276
W2ZF101276
K8BL257274
N7AGF200240
N3CAL171181
W7YED127163
DL6IANNew154
K3HPA128150
EA2AA125148
NA1ME100126
WD9EWK(DM42)100126
WY4XNew108
N7UJJNew101
F4BKVNew100
W4WTNew100

If you find errors or omissions. please contact Ron off-list at <mycall>@<mycall>.com and he will revise the announcement. This list was developed by comparing the ARRL .pdf listings for the two months. It’s a visual comparison so omissions are possible. Apologies if your call was not mentioned. Thanks to all those who are roving to grids that are rarely on the birds. They are doing most of the work!

[ANS thanks Ron Parsons, W5RKN for the above information.]

AMSAT GridMaster Award

With last week’s activation of DL88, there are 4 new recipients of the GridMaster award. They all sent in their applications within days of each other.

#16 Chris AA8CH
#17 Robert KE4AL
#18 George N3GS
#19 Kerry WC7V

Awesome job and thanks to K5Z for activating the grid!

[ANS thanks Bruce Paige, KK5DO for the above information.]

Need new satellite antennas? Purchase Arrows, Alaskan Arrows,
and M2 LEO-Packs from the AMSAT Store. When you purchase through
AMSAT, a portion of the proceeds goes towards
Keeping Amateur Radio in Space.
https://amsat.org/product-category/hardware/

IARU Coordinates Frequencies for Six Satellites in October

During the month of October the IARU coordinated frequencies for six upcoming Amateur Radio satellites:

  • OreSat0 (Portland State Aerospace Society at Portland State University is a 1U CubeSat. The mission is to provide flight heritage to the “OreSat bus”, an open source card-cage based system that is ideally suited for education CubeSat projects involving interdisciplinary teams of students. Downlinks on UHF using CW beacon, 9k6 G3RUH AX25/APRS packet beacon and a 96k GMSK engineering downlink. Also downlink on S Band using amateur 802.11b DPSK with 11M chip/sec spread and 1 Mbps data rate for bulk mission data. Downlinks on 436.500 MHz and 2425.00 MHz have been coordinated. Planning a launch with Momentus Space from Cape Canaveral in February 2021 into a 450 km polar orbit. More info at: http://oresat.org/ and https://github.com/oresat.
  • TartanArtibeus-1 (Carnegie Mellon University) is a 1P PocketQube. The Amateur Radio community globally will be provided with a delay ping-back service, allowing Amateurs to send  messages, with replies from the satellite transmitted later.  A UHF downlink using 3kbps FSK compatible with RadioHead library. A downlink on 437.170 MHz has been coordinated. Planning a SpaceX launch from KSC in December 2020 into a 550km SSO.
  • SATLLA-2 (Ariel University) is a 2P picosat that will take low-resolution photos and will broadcast the photos over the Amateur Radio with its position in orbit and data from its sensors. UHF and S Band downlinks using LORA from 476bps to 9k6 bps. Downlinks on 437.250 MHz and 2401.000 MHz have been coordinated. Planning a SpaceX launch into a 410 km 52 degree orbit in December 2020.
  •  CSIROSat-1 (University of South Australia & CSIRO) is a 3U CubeSat mission that will perform hyperspectral infrared imaging of the earth for scientific research purposes. An experimental two-way link for Amateur Radio operators to exchange short messages through a ‘ping-pong’ arrangement of data exchange is among the several communications experiments. Proposing a 9k6 FSK downlink. A downlink on 437.315 MHz has been coordinated. Planning a launch from Cape Canaveral in March 2021 into an ISS orbit.
  •  PyCubed-1 (Carnegie Mellon University) is a 1P PocketQube that will test a novel 3-axis attitude control system based on magnetic torque coils. In addition, it will test new low- power LoRa radios in low-Earth orbit which will be of interest to many other Amateur Radio small satellite operators. Proposing a 3kbps UHF downlink. A downlink on 437.290 MHz has been coordinated. Packets are standard LoRa format and are compatible with the RadioHead library. Planning a SpaceX launch from KSC into a 550 km SSO in December 2020.
  • Grizu-263A (Zonguldak Bülent Ecevit University) is a pocketcube satellite with a digipeater mode that will allow forwarding of received messages back to earth to support communication between Amateur Radio operators. Proposing a UHF downlink using 4k8 FSK. A downlink on 437.190 MHz has been coordinated. Planning a SpaceX launch from Vandenberg into a 500 600 km SSO in December 2020.

Information on these and other upcoming satellites can be found at:
http://www.amsat.org.uk/iaru/.

[ANS thanks the IARU for the above information.]

Want to fly the colors on your own grid expedition?
Get your AMSAT car flag and other neat stuff
from our Zazzle store!
25% of the purchase price of each product goes
towards Keeping Amateur Radio in Space
https://www.zazzle.com/amsat_gear

ARISS Team Attends ISS National Lab Education Summit

A group of ARISS team members took part in the three-day ISS National Lab Education Summit on October 26-28, 2020.  On Day 1, Space Station Explorers Senior Education Manager Dan Barstow gave a presentation titled “20 Years of STEM Education—the ISS National Lab Report. His talk highlighted several of the Space Station Explorers programs, and one was ARISS. Barstow related a small amount of ARISS’s long history, described how it enhances youth education, and displayed some of ARISS’s metrics on engaging youth.

Frank Bauer shared additional comments on ARISS activities and plans such as this past summer’s balloon race using amateur radio payloads and how ARISS transformed its school contacts in ways that safeguarded students from Covid.

Rosalie White added that ARISS is not just K-12; colleges and universities often host ARISS contacts with the students mentoring elementary schools.  She thanked Barstow for describing ARISS as “having the power to combine ham radio and space exploration into a magical elixir to engage students.”

Day 3 sessions focused on upcoming activities allowing students to engage with the ISS.  At another session, Barstow introduced the Student Mission Control project, an initiative where students can receive live ISS telemetry data in a mission control setting, and then analyze and interpret the data. Barstow described the ARISS contribution to this initiative, where on-board telemetry data
acquired by sensors attached to an ARISS-developed Raspberry Pi computer can be transmitted from the ARISS on-board radio system and directly received on the ground and evaluated by the Mission Control students.

[ANS thanks ARISS for the above information.]

Upcoming Satellite Operations

CN73,CN74,CN82,CN83, November 6-8, 2020

@KF6JOQ will be operating holiday style on FM. He will tweet as soon as he knows were and when. His main goal is CN73/83 and to run doubles. “Hope I can help a few.”

KH67, November 11-21, 2020

7Q7RU on AO-7, RS-44 and QO-100.  More information at:https://dxpedition.wixsite.com/7q7ru

HH02, November 13-15, 2020

Sandro Ribeiro, PY1SAN and Claudio Marcelo, PY1CMT are QRV on QO-100 with some opportunities AO-07, FO-29 or RS-44 using CW and SSB as ZX6BA from Prado, Brazil, Bahia. The activity will be on several HF bands too, using CW and FT8 on an Alex Loop Antenna with 5 watts. QSL via LoTW.

FN53/54/55/56/57/64/65/66/67 November 13-18, 2020

@KL7TN will be in Maine. Details to follow.

GG99, November 16-18, 2020.

Sandro Ribeiro, PY1SAN and Claudio Marcelo, PY1CMT are QRV on QO-100 and maybe AO-07, FO-29, RS-44 using CW and SSB as PR1S from Nova Almeida, Brazil, Espirito Santo. Activity will be on several HF bands too, using CW and FT8 on an Alex Loop Antenna with 5 watts. QSL via LoTW.

[ANS thanks Paul Overn, KE0PBR for the above information.]

Hamfests, Conventions, Maker Faires, and Other Events

November 11, 2020

Rick Tejera K7TEJ from the Thunderbird Amateur Radio Club (TBARC) will be giving a presentation and demonstration of satellite operations to the Northwest Christian School in Glendale, AZ. The demo will be on SO-50 at 2323UTC. He will be using the club call WB7TBC and the church is in Grid DM33wp. He may try to get a student on the air. Please keep an ear out for Rick and respond to his call as the kids will appreciate it. Rick will send a reminder as the date gets closer.

[ANS thanks Paul Overn, KE0PBR for the above information.]

AMSAT, along with our ARISS partners, is developing an amateur
radio package, including two-way communication capability, to
be carried on-board Gateway in lunar orbit.

Support AMSAT’s projects today at https://www.amsat.org/donate/

ARISS News

No ARISS contacts are currently scheduled.

November 12: ARISS educator Kathy Lamont is scheduled to give a talk at the online Virginia Association of Science Teachers Conference. Her presentation is titled “How to Talk with an Astronaut 250 Miles Above You.”

The latest information on the operation mode can be found at https://www.ariss.org/current-status-of-iss-stations.html

The latest list of frequencies in use can be found at https://www.ariss.org/contact-the-iss.html

The deadline for United States organizations to submit an ARISS contact proposal is November 24, 2020. For more information, visit http://www.ariss.org/.

[ANS thanks Charlie Sufana, AJ9N  for the above information.]

Shorts from All Over

EIRSAT-1 Video Available Online

The EIRSAT-1 CubeSat, built by students at University College Dublin is due for launch on the Vega rocket in early 2021. David Murphy, EI9HWB and Fergal Marshall of the EIRSAT-1 team gave a comprehensive technical run-through of the satellite’s payload, subsystems and onboard communications.  You can watch the entire video presentation at: https://amsat-uk.org/.

[ANS thanks AMSAT-UK for the above information.]

Tel Aviv TAU-SAT1 Gets Press Coverage

The Times of Israel posted an informative article on the Tel Aviv University’s plans to launch a “shoebox-size” satellite next year. Read the article at: https://tinyurl.com/ANS-313-Tel-Aviv.

[ANS thanks Mark Johns, K0JM for the above information.]

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the President’s Club. Members of the President’s Club, as sustaining donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive additional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT office.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the student rate for a maximum of six post-secondary years in this status.

Contact Martha at the AMSAT office for additional student membership information.

73,

This week’s ANS Editor,

Frank Karnauskas, N1UW
n1uw at amsat dot org