AMSAT-NA

AMSAT News Service
Weekly Satellite Report

December 1, 2002

ISS . RS-12 . RS-13 . RS-15 . AO-7 . AO-10 . UO-11 . UO-14 . AO-16 . LO-19 . FO-20 . UO-22 . KO-23 . KO-25 . IO-26 . AO-27 . FO-29 . TO-31 . GO-32 . SO-33 . PO-34 . UO-36 . AO-40 . SO-41 . SO-42 . NO-44 . NO-45 . MO-46

ANS News Bulletins for this date
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Phase 3D / AMSAT-OSCAR 40 / AO-40

Launched: November 16, 2000 aboard an Ariane 5 launcher from Kourou, French Guiana.
Uplink V-band 145.840 to 145.990 MHz CW/LSB
U-band 435.550 to 435.800 MHz CW/LSB
L1-band 1269.250 to 1269.500 MHz CW/LSB
L2-band 1268.325 to 1268.575 MHz CW/LSB
Downlink S-band 2401.225 - 2401.475 MHz CW/USB
K-band 24,048.010 - 24,048.060 MHz CW/USB
For the current transponder operating schedule visit http://www.amsat-dl.org/journal/adlj-p3d.htm

Status: Currently, the U/L-1 to S-2/K passband is active (various times)

AO-40 experimental transponder operation started on May 05, 2001 at approximately 08:00 UTC when the U-band and L1-band uplinks were connected to the S-2 transmitter passband downlink via the matrix switch.

The passband times have been extended to MA 50-200. ALON/ALAT is nominally 0/0 with station keeping.

Grid hunters may like to check out "The Unofficial AMSAT Grid Hunters Report" by Drew, KO4MA at http://www.mindspring.com/~glasbrenner/report.htm

Wednesday V-Rx sessions are terminated during this time. The K-Tx sessions are terminated during this time. The RUDAK unit has been turned off.

Gene, W3PM has an Excel spreadsheet that will help evaluate your AO-40 groundstation. Download it at http://www.amsat.org/amsat/ftp/software/spreadsheet/w3pm-ao40-v2.1.zip

Scott, NX7U has a program that automatically calculates Uplink S/N against a supplied Nova for Windows orbital listing. Download it at http://members.cox.net/nx7u/ao40/ao40v20_AutoSNR.zip

The "AO-40 FAQ", compiled by Steve, VK5ASF is now available at http://www.amsat.org

Ground stations capturing telemetry from AO-40 are asked to send a copy of the data to the AO-40 archive at ao40-archive@amsat.org.

For the current transponder-operating schedule visit http://www.amsat-dl.org/journal/adlj-p3d.htm

[ANS thanks AMSAT-NA, AMSAT-DL and the ARRL for this information]

International Space Station/ARISS

Worldwide packet uplink: 145.990 MHz FM
Region 1 voice uplink: 145.200 MHz FM
Region 2/3 voice uplink: 144.490 MHz FM
Worldwide downlink: 145.800 MHz FM
TNC callsign RS0ISS
The ARISS initial station was launched September 2000 aboard shuttle Atlantis.

ARISS is made up of delegates from major national amateur radio organizations, including AMSAT.

Status: Operational.

Numerous contacts have been made with the ISS Crew.

Alain, IZ6BYY and Claudio, IK1SLD wish to announce the opening of the ISS Fan Club. The ISS Fan Club is a free no-profit organization. The first 100 subscribers will receive by mail a nice picture of ISS Crew #1 signed by Sergei Krikalev and Yuri Gidzenko at the ISS Forum 2001 in Berlin. The official ISS Fan Club website is at http://www.issfanclub.com

ISS packet activity has resumed. A good discussion on its use is available at http://www.rac.ca/arispak2.htm

The latest ARISS announcements and successful school list is available at http://ariss.gsfc.nasa.gov

An archive of school contacts can be found at http://www.msnbc.com/news/505064.asp

NASA information on the ISS station can be found at http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/station/reference/radio/

The ISS daily crew schedule (which gives an idea when crew members have free time and may be available for amateur radio operations) can be found at http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/station/timelines/

A detailed breakdown of the antenna installation with some great pictures and diagrams (depicting the entire ISS ham system including antennas) can be downloaded at http://ariss.gsfc.nasa.gov/EVAs/amsat01.pdf

U.S. callsign: NA1SS
Russian callsigns: RS0ISS, RZ3DZR

The QSL routes for stations working the International Space Station (all callsigns):

U.S stations: Margie Bourgoin KB1DCO
Attn: ARISS Expedition-1 (or 2, 3, etc.) QSL
ARRL, 225 Main Street
Newington, Connecticut 06111
SASE required
Canadian stations: Radio Amateurs of Canada
Attn: ARISS Expedition-1 (or 2, 3, etc.) QSL
720 Belfast Road, Suite 217
Ottawa, Ontario K1G 0Z5
European stations: AMSAT-France
16, rue de la Vallee
91360 Epinay sur Orge, France
SASE and 2 IRC's required

[ANS thanks Will Marchant, KC6ROL, and Jean-Louis Rault, F6AGR, for this information]

AMSAT OSCAR 7 AO-7

Uplink: 145.850 to 145.950 MHz CW/USB
432.125 to 432.175 MHz CW/LSB
Downlink: 29.400 to 29.500 MHz CW/USB
145.975 to 145.925 MHz CW/USB
Beacon: 29.502 MHz, 145.972 MHz, 435.1 MHz, 2304.1 MHz

Launched: November 15, 1974 by a Delta 2310 from Vandenberg Air Force Base, Lompoc, California.
Status: Semi-operational in sunlight.

After being declared dead 21 years ago in mid 1981 due to battery failure, AO-7 has miraculously sprung back to life and was first detected by Pat Gowen, G3IOR on June 21, 2002 at 1728 UTC. Jan King, W3GEY reports AO-7 is running off the solar panels only. It will only be on when in sunlight and off in eclipse. Therefore, AO-7 will reset each orbit and may not turn on each time.

On July 11, 2002 AO-7 was successfully commanded for the first time since it was declared dead 21 years ago. Commands were sent and accepted to change the CW beacon code speed.

Command investigation continues. So far, 11 different commands have been accepted by AO-7.

Yoshi Imaishi, JF6BCC is compiling an excellent list of observations. Please send him whatever you have. jf6bcc@jarl.com

You can view the list at http://plaza16.mbn.or.jp/~palau/temp/AO7-mode-report.xls

Tim, K3TZ has written a program to decode AO-07 telemetry. The program can be downloaded at http://www.qsl.net/k3tz/files/K3TZ_AO-07_Telemetry_Decoder_0.5.zip

For more info: http://www.amsat.org/amsat/sats/n7hpr/ao7.html

[ANS thanks Pat Gowen, G3IOR and Jan King, W3GEY for this information]

AO-10

Uplink 435.030 to 435.180 MHz CW/LSB
Downlink 145.975 to 145.825 MHz CW/USB
Beacon 145.810 MHz (unmodulated carrier)
Launched June 16, 1983 by an Ariane launcher from Kourou, French Guiana
Semi-operational.

Stacey Mills, W4SM, has more information about the satellite at http://www.cstone.net/~w4sm/AO-10.html

[ANS thanks Stacey Mills, W4SM, for his AO-10 status information and web site]

UO-14

Uplink 145.975 MHz FM
Downlink 435.070 MHz FM
Launched January 22, 1990 by an Ariane launcher from Kourou, French Guiana
Operational.

Drew, KO4MA reports working YY5ADS in Caracas.

Tim, KG8OC, features UO-14 information on the Michigan AMSAT web site, see http://www.qsl.net/kg8oc

Ray, W2RS, has revised the AO-27 FAQ on http://www.amsat.org/amsat/intro/ao27faq.html to include information on UO-14.

Ramon, VE7RKK was active from TF, Iceland and OX, Greenland.

[ANS thanks Chris Jackson, G7UPN / ZL2TPO, for UO-14 information]

RS-15

Uplink 145.858 to 145.898 MHz CW/USB
Downlink 29.354 to 29.394 MHz CW/USB
Beacon 29.352 MHz (intermittent)
SSB meeting frequency 29.380 MHz (unofficial)
Launched December 26, 1994 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome
Semi-operational, Mode A (2m uplink, 10m downlink)

Dave, WB6LLO, has operating information for both RS-15 and RS-13 on his personal web site. In addition to satellite data, antenna information for mode A operation is also featured. The WB6LLO web site URL is http://home.san.rr.com/doguimont/uploads

JAS-1b FO-20

Uplink 145.900 to 146.000 MHz CW/LSB
Downlink 435.800 to 435.900 MHz CW/USB
Launched February 7, 1990 by an H1 launcher from the Tanegashima Space Center in Japan
Operational.

FO-20 is in mode JA continuously.

Drew, KO4MA reports working G8ATE, EB8AYA (IL18), and G4CUO.

Tak, JA2PKI, reported FO-20 control station operators believe that the UVC (Under Voltage Controller) is now regulating the transponder. The controller monitors battery voltage and tries to protect the batteries from over discharge.

[ANS thanks Kazu Sakamoto, JJ1WTK for the FO-20 status reports]

AO-27

Uplink 145.850 MHz FM
Downlink 436.795 MHz FM
Launched September 26, 1993 by an Ariane launcher from Kourou, French Guiana
Operational, mode J.

The latest information on AO-27 from control operator Michael Wyrick, N3UC (former N4USI), can be found at http://www.ao27.org

An AO-27 question-and-answer page is available on the AMSAT-NA web site, with updates by Ray, W2RS: http://www.amsat.org/amsat/intro/ao27faq.html.

[ANS thanks AMRAD for AO-27 information]

JAS-2 FO-29

Voice/CW Mode JA
Uplink 145.900 to 146.000 MHz CW/LSB
Downlink 435.800 to 435.900 MHz CW/USB
Digital Mode JD
Uplink 145.850, 145.870, 145.910 MHz FM
Downlink 435.910 MHz FM 9600 baud BPSK
Callsign 8J1JCS
Digi-talker Mode
Downlink 435.910 MHz FM
Launched August 17, 1996, by an H-2 launcher from the Tanegashima Space Center in Japan
Operational.

Mineo, JE9PEL, has an FO-29 satellite telemetry analysis program that will automatically analyze all digital telemetry from the satellite (such as current, voltage and temperature). FO29CWTE is available at http://www.ne.jp/asahi/hamradio/je9pel/

[ANS thanks Kazu Sakamoto, JJ1WTK, for the FO-29 status reports]

SO-41 SAUDISAT-1A

Uplink 145.850 MHz
Downlink 436.775 MHz
Broadcast Callsign SASAT1-11
BBS SASAT1-12
Launched: September 26, 2000 aboard a converted Soviet ballistic missile from the Baikonur Cosmodrome.
Operational but intermittent

One of two ham satellites from the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia built by the Space Research Institute at the King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology.

The spacecraft is operating in Mode-J, currently configured as an analog FM voice repeater. The spacecraft will operate in this mode intermittently, as power and spacecraft experiments permit.

SO-41's downlink RF power is 1 watt with left-hand circular polarization. The uplink antenna (located on top of the spacecraft) is linear in polarization.

Further information is available at http://www.amsat.org/amsat/sats/n7hpr/so41.html

[ANS thanks Turki Al-Saud for this information]

OSCAR-11

Downlink 145.826 MHz FM, 1200 baud PSK
Beacon 2401.500 MHz
Launched March 1, 1984 by a Delta-Thor rocket from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California
Semi-operational.

OSCAR-11 is currently operating in a default mode, controlled by the watch-dog timer. The satellite transmits continuous ASCII telemetry for about seven days on 145.826 MHz, followed by about 14 days of silence. However the mode-S beacon on 2401.5 MHz is ON continuously. If the present status continues the satellite should be heard again starting about 29 November.

At the present time, ground control are unable to command the satellite, due to low temperatures affecting the command decoder. They will attempt to command the satellite when the command decoder temperature has risen to 15C.

The mode-S beacon has been heard by Dick WD8PRX, Ken WD8PRX and Christian F1AFZ. All report good signals. Dick uses 24 dBi parabolic dish, with SSB UEK converter. Ken uses a 60 cm offset dish, with G3RUH patch, DownEast pre-amp, and Drake converter. Christian uses a 95 cm dish, 3.5t helix feed, and 3733 converter.

The following operating schedule is currently suspended.

ASCII status (210 seconds)
ASCII bulletin (60 seconds)
BINARY SEU (30 seconds)
ASCII TLM (90 seconds)
ASCII WOD (120 seconds)
ASCII bulletin (60 seconds)
BINARY ENG (30 seconds)

The ASCII bulletin is currently a static message, detailing modes and frequencies of all the amateur radio satellites.

More information on OSCAR-11 is available at http://www.users.zetnet.co.uk/clivew/

[ANS thanks Clive Wallis, G3CWV, for OSCAR-11 status information]

AMSAT-OSCAR-16 (PACSAT)

Uplink 145.900, 145.920, 145.940, 145.960 MHz FM, 1200 bps Manchester FSK
Downlink 437.025 MHz SSB, 1200 bps RC-BPSK 1200 Baud PSK
Beacon 2401.1428 MHz.
Broadcast callsign: PACSAT-11
BBS: PACSAT-12
Launched January 22, 1990 by an Ariane launcher from Kourou, French Guiana
Semi-operational. Digipeater on.

A WOD collection of current graphics along with general information and telemetry samples can be found at http://www.telecable.es/personales/ea1bcu

[ANS thanks Miguel A. Menendez, EA1BCU, for AO-16 status information.]

UO-22

Uplink 145.900 MHz FM
Downlink 435.120 MHz FM 9600 Baud FSK
Broadcast callsign: UOSAT5-11
BBS: UOSAT5-12
Launched July 17, 1991 by an Ariane launcher from Kourou, French Guiana
Operational

On November 21, 2002 Chris Jackson, G7UPN reported:

I've opened up UO-22 for users again...

UO-22 is operating OK at the moment. Some new software has been loaded to try and keep the downlink operating most of the time. It seems that after around 60000 charge/discharge cycles the Nicad batteries are starting to show their age (!!) and it's probable that the power system will no longer be able to support operations when UO-22 enters a period of eclipse in a few months time (although we'll do all we can to try and keep it operational).

The downlink will also be switched off from time to time over certain parts of the globe. Generally these quiet periods should be out of range of most stations. Currently, they are in the middle of the Pacific, Indian Ocean, and central China. This is required to allow the attitude control system to operate correctly since the power system can not supply enough power to support both the transmitter and the magnetorquers.

Enjoy the bird while you can! At 11 1/2 years it's doing well, but it may not be available for a lot longer.

More information on the satellite is available at http://www.sstl.co.uk/

[ANS thanks Chris Jackson, G7UPN/ZL2TPO, for UO-22 information and Jim Weisenberger, AA7KC, for status information]

ITAMSAT IO-26

Uplink 145.875, 145.900, 145.925, 145.950 MHz FM
Downlink 435.812 MHz SSB, 1200 Baud PSK
Broadcast callsign: ITMSAT-11
BBS: ITMSAT-12
Launched September 26, 1993 by an Ariane launcher from Kourou, French Guiana
Semi-operational.

Digipeater function is on, open for APRS users.

On November 18, 2002 Alberto, IK2BD reported:

The current configuration of IO-26 allows only limited telemetry in MBL (safe) mode. To enable full telemetry and digipeating, we must re-load the full IHT high level software suite. This was delayed several times, but we plan to do that in the near future. When the IHT code is running, the bulletin will announce that.

[ANS thanks ITAMSAT Project Manager Alberto E. Zagni, I2KBD, for this information]

PCSat NO-44

Uplink/downlink 145.827 MHz 1200 baud AX-25 AFSK via PCSAT-1
Aux/Uplink 435.250 MHz 9600 baud via PCSAT (off)
APRS Downlink 144.390 MHz (Region 2)
Launched: September 30, 2001 aboard an Athena-1 rocket from the
Kodiak Alaska launch complex.
Status: Operational

PCSat is a 1200-baud APRS digipeater designed for use by stations using hand-held or mobile transceivers. Downlinks feed a central web site http://pcsat.aprs.org. The APRS-equipped PCSat was built by midshipmen from the U.S. Naval Academy under the guidance of Bob Bruninga, WB4APR.

A new version of PCSAT.EXE has been posted at ftp://tapr.org/dosstuff/APRSdos/pcsat017.zip

For more information, visit the PCSat web site at http://web.usna.navy.mil/~bruninga/pcsat.html

[ANS thanks Bob Bruninga, WB4APR, for PCSat information]

TIUNGSAT-1 MO-46

Uplink 145.850 or 145.925 MHz 9600 baud FSK
Downlink 437.325 MHz
Broadcast callsign: MYSAT3-11
BBS: MYSAT3-12
NUP: MYSAT3-10
Launched September 26, 2000 aboard a converted Soviet ballistic missile from the Baikonur Cosmodrome
Status: Operational at 38k4 baud FSK

TiungSat-1 is Malaysia's first micro-satellite and in addition to commercial land and weather imaging payloads will offer FM and FSK amateur radio communication.

TiungSat-1, named after the mynah bird of Malaysia, was developed as a collaborative effort between the Malaysian government and Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd.

The following satellites are in orbit but are semi-operational at this time:

LUSAT-OSCAR-19

Uplink 145.840, 145.860, 145.880, 145.900 MHz 1200 bps Manchester FSK
Downlink 437.150 MHz SSB, 1200 bps RC-BPSK
CW Downlink 437.125 MHz
Broadcast callsign: LUSAT-11
BBS: LUSAT-12
Launched January 22, 1990 by an Ariane launcher from Kourou, French Guiana

The CW beacon is sending eight telemetry channels and one status channel on 437.126 MHz. No BBS service is available. The digipeater is not active.

General information and telemetry samples can be found at http://www.telecable.es/personales/ea1bcu

[ANS thanks Miguel A. Menendez, EA1BCU, for LO-19 status information.]

TechSat-1B GO-32

Downlink: 435.325, 435.225 MHz FM (9600-baud FSK)
Uplinks: 145.860, 145.880, 145.890, 145.930 FM

Downlink: 435.225 MHz FM (9600-baud FSK)
(435.325 n/a - temperature problems)
Uplinks: 145.850, 145.890, 145.930 FM
1269.700, 1269.800, 1269.900 FM
Broadcast Callsign: 4XTECH-11
BBS Callsign: 4XTECH-12
Launched July 10, 1998 by a Russian Zenit rocket from the Baikonur Cosmodrome
Semi-operational.

As of October 22, 2002 the BBS is running and partially operational. There is a 2 PB user limit. System beacon every 30 seconds. Downlink output power has been reduced to 1 watt.

WinTelem v1.0 - TechSat's telemetry decoding software is now available for amateur use.

For more info check: http://www.iarc.org/techsat/

[ANS thanks Tidhar Teucher, 4Z5CA, and Shlomo Menuhin, 4X1AS for GO-32 status information]

SEDSAT SO-33

Downlink 437.910 MHz FM 9600 Baud FSK
Launched October 24, 1998 by a Delta 2 rocket from Cape Canaveral in Florida
Semi-operational.

The satellite is not currently available for uplink transmissions and image and transponder recovery efforts have been unsuccessful.

SEDSAT-1 signifies Students for the Exploration and Development of Space (satellite number one).

SedSat-1 has downlinked months worth of telemetry data on the performance of its electrical power system parameters. The Nickel Metal Hydride batteries on the spacecraft were experimental and experienced some abuse due to a power negative situation. This information has provided NASA with useful information. With the exception of the imaging system and the use of the transponders, SedSat-1 has been judged a success.

For more information on SedSat-1 visit the satellite web site at http://www.seds.org/sedsat

ANS has no further information.

The following satellites are in orbit but are non-operational at this time:

RS-12

Uplink 21.210 to 21.250 MHz CW/USB
Downlink 29.410 to 29.450 MHz CW/USB
Beacon 29.408 MHz
Robot 29.454 MHz
Launched February 5, 1991 aboard a Russian Cosmos C launcher

Status: RS-12 was placed in Mode-K on February 19, 2002.

Hams reporting to the RS-12/13 Forum from across the US and Europe have stated that they have not been able to hear any beacons from either the RS-12 or RS-13 satellite packages since August 20, 2002.

Jerry, K5OE reports the following:

I recently queried several of my Russian friends and received this response from Oleg, RV3TH, in Nihzni Novgorod:

Yesterday I made a telephone call to my friend from Siberia. He works in one of the checking centres for satellites. He says: "Electronical devices of satellite COSMOS2123 (and RS12/13) perished after superpower protonflashes on the Sun (July/August 2002)" Control devices and receivers perished first, and then a beacon. They have hopes to restore the satellite, but it is very small. Jerry, you can use this information, but it is NON OFFICIAL information. (above paraphrased by N1JEZ)

The latest information on RS-12 and RS-13 can be found on the AC5DK RS-12/13 Satellite Operators page:

http://www.qsl.net/ac5dk/rs1213/rs1213.html

[ANS thanks Kevin Manzer, AC5DK, for RS-12 information]

RS-13

Uplink 21.260 to 21.300 MHz CW/USB
Downlink 145.860 to 145.900 MHz CW/USB
Beacon 145.860 MHz
Robot 145.908 MHz
Launched February 5, 1991 aboard a Russian Cosmos C launcher

Status: RS-13 was reactivated in Mode-T on February 19, 2002.

Hams reporting to the RS-12/13 Forum from across the US and Europe have stated that they have not been able to hear any beacons from either the RS-12 or RS-13 satellite packages since August 20, 2002.

Jerry, K5OE reports the following:

I recently queried several of my Russian friends and received this response from Oleg, RV3TH, in Nihzni Novgorod:

Yesterday I made a telephone call to my friend from Siberia. He works in one of the checking centres for satellites. He says: "Electronical devices of satellite COSMOS2123 (and RS12/13) perished after superpower protonflashes on the Sun (July/August 2002)" Control devices and receivers perished first, and then a beacon. They have hopes to restore the satellite, but it is very small. Jerry, you can use this information, but it is NON OFFICIAL information. (above paraphrased by N1JEZ)

The latest information on RS-12 and RS-13 can be found on the AC5DK RS-12/13 Satellite Operators page at http://www.qsl.net/ac5dk/rs1213/rs1213.html

[ANS thanks Kevin Manzer, AC5DK, for this information]

KITSAT KO-23

Uplink 145.850, 145.900 MHz FM
Downlink 435.175 MHz FM, 9600 Baud FSK
Broadcast callsign: HL01-11
BBS: HL01-12
Launched August 10, 1992 by an Ariane launcher from Kourou, French Guiana
Status: Non-operational

Jim, AA7KC, reports that KO-23's downlink transmitter continues in a non-operational status.

[ANS thanks Jim Weisenberger, AA7KC, and KyungHee Kim, HL0ENJ, for KO-23 status information]

KO-25

Uplink 145.980 MHz FM
Downlink 436.500 MHz FM, 9600 Baud FSK
Broadcast callsign: HL02-11
BBS: HL02-12
Launched September 26, 1993 by an Ariane launcher from Kourou, French Guiana
Non-operational.

Andrew, G8TZJ reports on October 11, 2002 that KO-25 has been off for several days.

[ANS thanks Jim Weisenberger, AA7KC, for this information]

TMSAT-1 TO-31

Uplink 145.925 MHz 9600 baud FSK
Downlink 436.925 MHz 9600 baud FSK
Broadcast callsign: TMSAT1-11
BBS: TMSAT1-12
Launched July 10, 1998 by a Zenit rocket from the Baikonur Cosmodrome
Status: Non-operational, no data downlinked since December 18, 2000

Chris G7UPN, (UoSAT operations manager) reports the following to ANS:

The TO-31 downlink will be off over most areas, with the exception of Europe and Thailand.

ProcMail V2.00G has been released by G7UPN. This software permits the processing of image files from TO-31. It has been posted to the AMSAT-NA FTP site at http://www.amsat.org/amsat/software/win32/wisp

Many of the high-resolution color images transmitted by TMSAT are compressed using a UoSAT compression format. This format is supported by the VK5HI CCD display program.

[ANS thanks Chris Jackson, G7UPN/ZL2TPO, for TO-31 status information]

PANSAT PO-34

Uplink/downlink frequency (listed on the PanSat web site) 436.500 MHz
Launched October 30, 1998 by the Shuttle Discovery
Status: unknown

The satellite is not available for general uplink transmissions.

The Naval Postgraduate School developed PanSat. At the time of launch, PanSat spread-spectrum digital transponders were to be available to amateur radio operators along with software to utilize this technology.

The satellite is still operating, however, the spread spectrum packet radio portion never took place. The spacecraft is now beyond it's initial 2-year mission life, but telemetry records are still being downloaded.

For more information, visit the official PANSAT web site at:

http://www.sp.nps.navy.mil/pansat/

PanSat was the featured cover article in the July/August 1999 issue of the AMSAT-NA Journal (written by KD6DRA and N7HPR).

ANS has no further information.

UoSAT-12 UO-36

Uplink 145.960 MHz, 9600 baud FSK
Downlink 437.025, 437.400 MHz, 9600 baud FSK
Broadcast callsign: UO121-11
BBS: UO121-12
Launched April 21, 1999 by a Russian launcher from the Baikonur Cosmodrome
Status: Unknown

UO-36 carries a number of imaging payloads, digital store-and-forward communications and mode L/S transponders.

Paul, KB2SHU, tells ANS that UO-36 has not been operational (over North America) since late July 2001. In addition, Sangat, 9M2SS, reports he has not copied UO-36 since July 30, 2001.

The VK5HI viewer shareware for UO-36 is available on the AMSAT-NA web site at ftp://ftp.amsat.org/amsat/software/win32/display/ccddsp97-119.zip

Further information on UO-36 is available from: http://www.sstl.co.uk/

[ANS thanks Chris G7UPN/ZL2TPO, and the University of Surrey, for this information]

SO-42 SAUDISAT-1B

Uplink to be released
Downlink 437.075 MHz
Broadcast Callsign SASAT2-11
BBS SASAT2-12
Launched September 26, 2000 aboard a converted Soviet ballistic missile from the Baikonur Cosmodrome
Status: Unknown. ANS has received no additional information.

When/if operational, SaudiSat-1B will operate as 9600-baud digital store-and-forward systems as well analog FM repeater mode capability. One of two new ham satellites from the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia built by the Space Research Institute at the King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology.

Further information is available at http://www.amsat.org/amsat/sats/n7hpr/so42.html

[ANS thanks Turki Al-Saud for this information]

Sapphire NO-45

Downlink 437.095 MHz 1200 baud AX-25 AFSK
Uplink 145.945 MHz UI digipeater
Launched: September 30, 2001 aboard an Athena-1 rocket from the Kodiak, Alaska launch complex.
Status: Non-operational

Student built Sapphire was launched through the U.S. Naval Academy Satellite program. Its primary missions are sensor experiments, a camera, and voice synthesizer. For more information, visit the Sapphire web site at http://students.cec.wustl.edu/~sapphire/sapphire_overview.html

[ANS thanks Bob Bruninga, WB4APR, for PCSat information]


This week's AMSAT News Service Weekly Satellite Report was edited by AMSAT  News Service Principal Satellite Investigator Mike Seguin, N1JEZ. Please send any updates to N1JEZ, n1jez@amsat.org.

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