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Upcoming ARISS contact with Gymnasium Unterrieden,Sindelfingen, Germany



An International Space Station school contact has been planned with participants at Gymnasium Unterrieden, Sindelfingen, Germany on 13 Sept. The event is scheduled to begin at approximately 07:15 UTC.

The duration of the contact is approximately 9 minutes and 30 seconds.

The contact will be direct between OR4ISS and DN1ISS. The contact should be audible over Germany and adjacent areas. Interested parties are invited to listen in on the 145.80 MHz downlink. The contact is expected to be conducted in English.

 

The Gymnasium Unterrieden is a public secondary school in Sindelfingen. Sindelfingen is located next to Stuttgart in the south west of Germany, 48° 43' N, 8° 58' E. About 880 students grade 5 to 13 learn various languages (English, French, Latin) and they can choose a scientific profile and in the near future a sport profile. The ISS school contact is a space oriented educative project for all grade levels.

 

 

Participants will ask as many of the following questions as time allows: 

 

1.  What did you think, when you entered the ISS for the first time?

2.  What sort of character trait are needed to be an astronaut?

3.  Did you have any critical situations up there yet?

4.  How are dissents in opinions dealt with during a mission?

5.  Why did you want to work on the ISS? And would you do it again?

6.  What did you learn in school, which helped you most to become an 

    astronaut?

7.  Are you happy that you don´t see any advertisments on the ISS?

8.  Is there an up and a down defined on the ISS?

9.  What experiments are conducted on the ISS? Are they secret?

10. In your opinion, what is the most promising experiment on board this 

    time?

11. What are the main differences between the outdoor missions on the ISS and 

    the technical activities on earth?

12. Do you have alcoholic drinks on the ISS?

13. Do you wish to be back to normal gravity sometimes?

14. Did your plans for your future change while being in space?

15. What do you miss most being on the ISS?

16. How do you spend your free-time on the ISS?

17. What was the most interesting thing you have done on the ISS?

18. What was your most serious problem on the ISS?

19. Did you ever loose orientation on the ISS?

20. In which language do you communicate with your fellows on the ISS?

21. Do you still have a 24-day-and-night-rhythm?

22. What have you eaten in the past 24 hours and how did it taste?

23. Are the monetary expenses for the ISS justified in your opinion?

24. Is it hard to get used to working under zero-g-conditions with other 

    persons due to momentum transfer?

25. How long does it take to put on the space-suit and how does it feel to 

    wear it?

26. What did you do in the last 24 hours? Do you have a daily routine?

27. Do the training program on earth match the reality in space?

28. Is it hard to stay for such a long time in the space station?

 

 

Information about the upcoming ARISS contacts can be found at http://www.ariss.org/upcoming.htm#NextContact. 

 

Next planned event(s):

 

   1.  NASA Goddard Child Development Center, Greenbelt, MD, direct via K6DUE

       Thu, 13Sept12 16:43 UTC 

 

   2.  Burns Sci-Tech Charter School, Oak Hill, FL, direct via KK4KTJ

       Thu, 13Sept12 18:21 UTC 

 

   3.  Zespól Szkól Technicznych w Kole, Kolo, Poland, direct via  SP3PGZ

       Wed, 19Sept12 07:15 UTC

 

   4.  Sunset Hills Elementary, San Diego, CA, direct via KI6LZN

       Thu, 20Sept12 17:24 UTC 

 

   5.  Lafayette Middle School, Lafayette, GA, direct via W4LMS  

       Fri, 21Sept12 15:03 UTC 

 

 

ARISS is an international educational outreach program partnering the participating space agencies, NASA, Russian Space Agency, ESA, CNES, JAXA, and CSA, with the AMSAT and IARU organizations from participating countries.

 

ARISS offers an opportunity for students to experience the excitement of Amateur Radio by talking directly with crewmembers on-board the International Space Station. Teachers, parents and communities see, first hand, how Amateur Radio and crewmembers on ISS can energize youngsters' interest in science, technology, and learning. Further information on the ARISS program is available on the website http://www.ariss.org/ (graciously hosted by the Radio Amateurs of Canada).

 

Thank you & 73,

David - AA4KN

 

 
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