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Upcoming ARISS contact with Scouts Canada,Nova Scotia Council, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada



An International Space Station school contact has been planned with participants at Scouts Canada, Nova Scotia Council, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada on 23 June. The event is scheduled to begin at approximately 17:10 UTC. The duration of the contact is approximately 9 minutes and 30 seconds. The contact will be a telebridge between NA1SS and VK5ZAI. The contact should be audible over portions of Australia. Interested parties are invited to listen in on the 145.80 MHz downlink. The contact is expected to be conducted in English.

 

This ARISS contact will involve youth from Cubs, Scouts, and Ventures (Ages 8-15). In addition, this event will be held in conjunction with Scout groups earning their Science Badge Awards. Participants have been selected through application from various Nova Scotia Scouting Council members across central Nova Scotia. Prior to this telebridge contact a presentation on the summer sky with specific information on how to see the ISS will be provided by the Halifax Center of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada. The venue is the Keshen Goodman Library which is one of the largest facilities in the Halifax Library system. It is expected that 250 to 300 people will be in attendance in the open air lounge. In addition a live webcast will be provided.

 

 

Participants will ask as many of the following questions as time allows: 

 

1.  Do you get taller when you are in space?

2.  What is it like to live on the Space Station?

3.  How long did it take to become accustomed to living on the Space Station?

4.  How far above the Earth is the International Space Station?

5.  While on the Space Station what do you do with your spare time?

6.  What experiments are you working on?

7.  So if toilets flush clock-wise in the northern hemisphere and they flush   

    counter-clockwise in the southern hemisphere which way do they flush in 

    space?

8.  Why did you become an astronaut?

9.  How do you fly the Space Station?

10. How long have you been in orbit?

11. How long did it take you to travel from Earth to the Space Station?

12. What does it feel like as you re-enter the Earth's atmosphere?

13. What types of food do you have to eat?

14. What does it feel like during the launch from Earth?

 

 

 

Information about the upcoming ARISS contacts can be found at http://www.ariss.org/upcoming.htm#NextContact. 

 

Next planned event(s):

   1. Virginia Air and Space, Hampton, VA, direct via KE4ZXW

      Tue, 26 June 2012, 18:22 UTC 

 

   2. 2012 STEM Summit, Dallas, TX, telebridge via K6DUE

      Thu, 28 June 2012, 18:11 UTC

 

 

ARISS is an international educational outreach program partnering the participating space agencies, NASA, Russian Space Agency, ESA, CNES, JAXA, and CSA, with the AMSAT and IARU organizations from participating countries.

 

ARISS offers an opportunity for students to experience the excitement of Amateur Radio by talking directly with crewmembers on-board the International Space Station. Teachers, parents and communities see, first hand, how Amateur Radio and crewmembers on ISS can energize youngsters' interest in science, technology, and learning. Further information on the ARISS program is available on the website http://www.ariss.org/ (graciously hosted by the Radio Amateurs of Canada).

 

Thank you & 73,

David - AA4KN

 
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