[Date Prev][Date Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next] - [Date Index][Thread Index][Author Index]

Upcoming ARISS contact with The Mariner's Museum, Newport News, VA



An International Space Station school contact has been planned with participants at The Mariner's Museum, Newport News, VA on 02 May. The event is scheduled to begin at approximately 16:14 UTC. The duration of the contact is approximately 9 minutes and 30 seconds. The contact will be a telebridge between OR4ISS and IK1SLD. The contact should be audible over Italy and adjacent areas. Interested parties are invited to listen in on the 145.80 MHz downlink. The contact is expected to be conducted in English.

 

The Mariners' Museum is a non-profit museum with a mission to "educate, engage, and inspire people around the globe to embrace the rich and diverse maritime world." We do this through exhibitions and programming including lectures, in-house and outreach school classes, and educational programs presented via Interactive videoconferencing. We are thrilled to connect with the International Space Station as this connection continues the story of exploration, carrying it from the sea to the stars. Our goal is for students across the country to see that the exploration of mankind is ongoing, and can be part of their story as well.

 

 

 

Participants will ask as many of the following questions as time allows: 

 

1.  What is the most important piece of technology at the space station?

2.  Do you get homesick?

3.  The early explorers explored to find quicker routes to Asia, what are 

    scientists hoping to find?

4.  When was the last time explorers found something new?

5.  How do the astronauts continue to have a constant flow of oxygen?

6.  How do you find your way- (thinking the use of an astrolabe vs. what you 

    use)?

7.  Where are you located? What can you see from there?

8.  How do you know where things like stars and planets are without the help 

    of satellites?

9.  Why is it so important to explore space?

10. How does the journey compare to that of the original explorers? In terms 

    of travel time, distance, and conditions?

11. How many days do you stay there (in space)?

12. How will space look different in the 22nd century?

13. Have you found a world besides Earth that we can breathe on?

14. How do the astronauts get on and off the International Space Station?

15. What does it feel like to be in space?

16. How long does it take to get there from Earth?

17. How far have you explored space?

18. Where is the closest Galaxy?

19. Are you looking for other life forms in space?

20. How long till we have mastered space travel to the point that it will be 

    open to the general public?

21. How many other galaxies are out there?

22. Are you going to send people to Mars?

23. Do you think that humans will ever make something that can fly into the 

    sun?

24. What is the most interesting planet you have explored and why?

25. What is your favorite thing about space?

26. If it is extremely dangerous to explore space, why would you do it?

27. Is it possible to land a space shuttle on Mars with people in it? How 

    long would it take?

28. What is currently the biggest meteorite in space?

 

 

 

Information about the upcoming ARISS contacts can be found at http://www.ariss.org/upcoming.htm#NextContact. 

 

Next planned event(s):

 

   1.  Farnsworth Aerospace PK-8 Magnet School, St. Paul, MN, direct via 

       N9XH 

       Mon, 7 May 2012, 16:14 UTC

 

 

ARISS is an international educational outreach program partnering the participating space agencies, NASA, Russian Space Agency, ESA, CNES, JAXA, and CSA, with the AMSAT and IARU organizations from participating countries.

 

ARISS offers an opportunity for students to experience the excitement of Amateur Radio by talking directly with crewmembers on-board the International Space Station. Teachers, parents and communities see, first hand, how Amateur Radio and crewmembers on ISS can energize youngsters' interest in science, technology, and learning. Further information on the ARISS program is available on the website http://www.ariss.org/ (graciously hosted by the Radio Amateurs of Canada).

 

Thank you & 73,

David - AA4KN

 
----
Sent via sarex@amsat.org. Opinions expressed are those of the author.
Not an AMSAT member? Join now to support the amateur satellite program!
Subscription settings: http://amsat.org/mailman/listinfo/sarex



AMSAT Top AMSAT Home