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Upcoming ARISS contact with Morioka Children's Museum of Science, Morioka, Iwate, Japan



An International Space Station school contact has been planned with participants at Morioka Children's Museum of Science, Morioka, Iwate, Japan on 28 Jan. The event is scheduled to begin at approximately 06:53 UTC.

The duration of the contact is approximately 9 minutes and 30 seconds.

 

The contact will be direct between NA1SS and 8J7A. The contact should be audible over Japan and the adjacent area. Interested parties are invited to listen in on the 145.80 MHz downlink. The contact is expected to be conducted in Japanese.

 

Amateur Radio Morioka club operated with Boy Scouts of Morioka 5.the Scout Association of Japan from Morioka Children's Museum of Science.

 

Participants will ask as many of the following questions (translated) as time allows: 

 

1.  I suspect there is lots of space debris floating in space in addition to 

    falling stars. What do you do to prevent them from coming into collision   

    with you?
2.  I'd like to be active internationally like you in the future. Could you   

    give us some beneficial advice depending on your experiences?
3.  When you were aiming to be an astronaut, were there any rewarding 

    experiences you had as a boy scout?
4.  Do you feel there's a clear distinction between day and night in the 

    spaceship? Which time zone do you adjust your watches to?
5.  Why don't artificial satellites fall on the earth?
6.  What is the most interesting job to you of all the missions in the space 

    station?
7.  I've heard you are likely to have flabby muscles during a long stay in 

    space. What muscular exercise do you do? And how long?
8.  How do you relax when you are tired in the spaceship?
9.  Do you take rest days in the space station? What do you do in your free ]

    time? 
10. Can elementary and junior schoolers even travel through space after 

    receiving proper training? What sort of training do you think is 

    necessary?
11. When did you become interested in outer space? What made you decide to be 

    a spaceman?
12. Do you notice any effects of global warming when you see the earth from 

    the space station?
13. You say you would like to spread around Japanese culture. What kind of 

    Japanese food is prepared in the spaceship? What's the most popular menu 

    among the crew?
14. How do you cook space food? What do you do with the devices for eating 

    after meals?
15. Do things make sounds in space?
16. How long do you sleep over there every day?
17. What is the shape of flame when you light a match in a weightless state?
18. What do you think of the stars seen from the space station as compared 

    with the ones you see from the earth?
19. Does the moon look closer from the station?
20. Is there anything more convenient in a gravity-free state than on Earth?
21. Is there any difference between the dream you have under weightless 

    conditions and the one above ground?
22. What has made the biggest impression on you since you have been staying 

    in the space station?

 

 

Information about the upcoming ARISS contacts can be found at http://www.ariss.org/upcoming.htm#NextContact. 

 

Next planned event(s):

 

Riley Ave. School, Calverton, New York 

Tue 02 Feb 2010 17:43 UTC  

 

 

ARISS is an international educational outreach program partnering the participating space agencies, NASA, Russian Space Agency, ESA, CNES, JAXA, and CSA, with the AMSAT and IARU organizations from participating countries.

 

ARISS offers an opportunity for students to experience the excitement of Amateur Radio by talking directly with crewmembers on-board the International Space Station. Teachers, parents and communities see, first hand, how Amateur Radio and crewmembers on ISS can energize youngsters' interest in science, technology, and learning. Further information on the ARISS program is available on the website http://www.ariss.org/ (graciously hosted by the Radio Amateurs of Canada).

 

Thank you & 73,

David - AA4KN
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