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upcoming ARISS contact with John Taylor Collegiate,Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada



An International Space Station school contact has been planned with participants at John Taylor Collegiate, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada on 04 Nov. The event is scheduled to begin at approximately 14:38 UTC.

The duration of the contact is approximately 9 minutes and 30 seconds. The contact will be a telebridge between NA1SS and WH6PN. The contact should be audible over Hawaii. Interested parties are invited to listen in on the 145.80 MHz downlink. The contact is expected to be conducted in English.

 

John Taylor Collegiate is a suburban high school in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.  The school has about 750 students from grades 9 to 12. The school has a tradition of excellence in academics, athletics and the arts. John Taylor offers students a wide range of enrichment activities, an Advanced Placement program, sport academy and integrated Special Needs Department. We are also proud to have Dr. Bob Thirsk as one of our alumini.  We are extremely grateful that he has taken time out of his schedule to speak with the students of John Taylor when he is in the city.

 

In preparation for our contact with the space station, each period 1 class teacher presented information about Dr. Thirsk and the International Space Station.  A selection process was undertaken to choose students from a variety of grades to participate in the opportunity.  We met several times at lunch hour to discuss questions and the mission on the space station.  The participating students did additional independent research on the areas that were of specific interest to them.  Prior to the contact, a pep rally is being held and the participating students will be introduced to the student body, along with a short presentation on the international space station.  When times are finalized local media representatives will be notified.

 

Participants will ask as many of the following questions as time allows: 

1.  What experiments are you working on at this time? 
2.  What does it feel like in space?
3.  What is a typical day on the space station?
4.  Does bone marrow diminish regardless of exercise while in space and 

    wouldn't this affect how long you can stay in Space?
5.  Since water was found on the moon, how does this influence future 

    research on the moon? 
6.  How do you get used to living in space? 
7.  What was your greatest challenge in becoming an astronaut? 
8.  What sorts of classes did you take and extra-curricular activities you 

    were involved in when you went to John Taylor that prepared you for where 

    you are today?
9.  What do you miss the most being away from home so long?
10. How much education and training does it take to be an astronaut?
11. When you return home, are there any expected changes to your body or 

    health and how are you going to adjust to life on Earth?
12. What is the funniest thing you have experienced in space?
13. Your achievements have produced a tremendous amount of pride in the John 

    Taylor Community. What would you say to a student who wants achieve goals  

    as great as yours?

  

Information about the upcoming ARISS contacts can be found at http://www.ariss.org/upcoming.htm#NextContact. 

Next planned event(s):

   
   Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, Daytona Beach, FL

   Thu 05 Nov 09  19:46 UTC 

   Tokaisonritsu Muramatsu Elementary School, Tokai Vill., Japan,  
   Fri 06 Nov 09  08:47 UTC

     

 

ARISS is an international educational outreach program partnering the participating space agencies, NASA, Russian Space Agency, ESA, CNES, JAXA, and CSA, with the AMSAT and IARU organizations from participating countries.

 

ARISS offers an opportunity for students to experience the excitement of Amateur Radio by talking directly with crewmembers on-board the International Space Station. Teachers, parents and communities see, first hand, how Amateur Radio and crewmembers on ISS can energize youngsters' interest in science, technology, and learning. Further information on the ARISS program is available on the website http://www.ariss.org/ (graciously hosted by the Radio Amateurs of Canada).

 

Thank you & 73,

David - AA4KN
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