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Upcoming ARISS Contact Schedule as of 2008-10-18 17:30 UTC



Upcoming ARISS Contact Schedule as of 2008-10-18  17:30 UTC


Quick list of scheduled contacts and  events:

Special operating SSTV event
SSTV system download  continues  (***)
Downlink should be 145.8 MHz  

The  crew has been informed about JOTA, so watch for possible operation.   
(***)


Budbrooke Primary School, Warwick, England, direct  via GB4OBS
Contact was successful Fri 2008-10-17 11:06 UTC 78 deg   (***)
Watch saved video stream at http://www.batc.tv   (***)

Combined group of Challenger Learning Centers, telebridge via  W6SRJ
Indianapolis Challenger Learning Center (Indianapolis,  IN)
Challenger Learning Center at Paducah (Paducah, KY)
Challenger  Learning Center—St. Louis (St. Louis, MO)
Contact was successful: Fri  2008-10-17 15:31 UTC 31 deg (***)

Austin Liberal Arts and Sciences  Academy, Austin, TX, direct via K5LBJ
Contact is a go for: Sun 2008-10-19  13:15 UTC 47 deg 

Pinehurst School, Ashland, Oregon, telebridge via  W6SRJ and WH6PN 
Contact is a go for : Mon 2008-10-20 15:06 UTC via WH6PN and  then handover 
to 15:14 UTC 54 deg via W6SRJ

National Planetarium,  Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, direct via 9M2RPN
Contact is a go for : Tues  2008-10-21 08:30 UTC 30 deg 

Armada Area Schools, Armada, Michigan,  direct via K8UO (***)
Contact is a go for: Fri 2008-10-24 17:13 UTC 58  deg  (***)

Scuola Media Statale  Donato Forlani I-70014  Conversano, Italy, direct via 
IZ7MKW (***)
Contact is a go for:  Tue  2008-10-28 09:37 UTC 34 deg (***)

Santa Teresa del Bambin Gesù Rome  00165, Italy,  direct via IK0US0 (***)
Contact is a go for: Thu  2008-10-30 08:51 UTC 44 deg (***)

Total number of ARISS ISS to  earth school contacts is 371. (***)
Total number of ARISS supported  terrestrial contacts is 10.

QSL information may be found at:  
http://www.arrl.org/ARISS/arissfaq.html   
http://www.rac.ca/ariss/oindex.htm#QSL's 

ISS callsigns:   DP0ISS, NA1SS, OR4ISS, RS0ISS  

*****************************************************************************


The  ARISS (a joint effort of AMSAT, the ARRL, NASA, the ARISS international  
partners including Canada, Russia, the European Partners, and Japan)  
operations 
team wishes to announce the following very tentative schedule for  ARISS 
school 
contacts.  This schedule is very fluid and may change at  the last minute.  
Remember that amateur radio use on the ISS is  considered secondary.  Please 
check the various AMSAT and ARISS  webpages for the latest announcements.  
Changes from the last  announcement are noted with (***).  Also, please check 
MSNBC.com for  possible live retransmissions 
(http://www.msnbc.com/m/lv/default.asp).   Listen for the ISS on the downlink 
of 
145.80 MHz.

The crossband  repeater has been active at times.
The frequencies are uplink of 437.80 MHz  and downlink of 145.80 MHz.

For information about educational  materials available from ISS partner space 
Agencies, please refer to links  on the ARISS Frequently Asked Questions page.

If you are interested  in supporting an ARISS contact, then you must fill
in an application.   The ARISS operations mentor team will not accept a
direct request to support  an ARISS contact; the application must first be 
sent 
to the ARISS region  coordinator.

You should also note that many schools think that they  can request a
specific date and time. Once an application has been accepted  the ARISS 
mentors will work with the school to determine a mutually agreeable  date.

There are several ARISS web  sites:

English:  http://www.rac.ca/ariss/   

French:  http://c.avmdti.free.fr/ariss/index.htm   

ARISS Europe:  http://www.ariss-eu.org/   

ARISS Japan:  http://www.jarl.or.jp/ariss/   

Your completely filled out application should be returned to  the
nearest coordinating ARISS region if your specific region is  not
listed.  E-mail is the preferred method of submitting an  application.

Here are the email addresses:
ARISS-Canada and all  other countries not covered:   ve2ka@rac.ca (Daniel 
Lamoureux  VE2KA)
ARISS-Europe:  jh.hahn@gmx.net (J. Hahn, DL3LUM /  PA1MUC)
ARISS-Japan and all Region 3 countries:  iaru-r3@jarl.or.jp  (Keigo Komuro 
JA1KAB)
ARISS-Russia: n2ww@attbi.com  (Valerie  Agabekov N2WW/UA6HZ)
ARISS-USA:  ARISS@arrl.org (The American Radio  Relay  League)


*****************************************************************************
QSL  information may be found at:   
http://www.arrl.org/ARISS/arissfaq.html   
http://www.rac.ca/ariss/oindex.htm#QSL's   
*****************************************************************************



Other  web sites that may be of interest  include:

http://www.arrl.org/sarex
http://www.arrl.org/ariss
http://www.amsat.org
http://ariss.gsfc.nasa.gov
http://spacelink.nasa.gov/index.html
http://ehb2.gsfc.nasa.gov/edcats/educator_guide/  

Latest ARISS announcements and news  
http://www.amsat.org/amsat/ariss/news/arissnews.txt 

Successful  school  list
http://www.amsat.org/amsat/ariss/news/Successful_ARISS_schools.rtf

The  ISS Fan Club website is:
http://www.issfanclub.com

K1ELA has a  website at:
http://members.aol.com/k1ela/index.html

ON6SAT has a  website at:
http://on6sat.com/links/

IRLP website at:   
http://www.discoveryreflector.ca  
This new site will have the links  for simulcast contacts that have IRLP and 
Echolink.   

Additional information may be found on the amsat.org calendar of  events for 
where to find the audio on EchoLink, IRLP and Shoutcast.  

Friends and family of the Expedition 12 crew have put together a  website:
http://www.expedition12.com         


A listing of ARISS related magazine articles:  
http://www.amsat.org/amsat/ariss/news/ARISS_magazine_articles.rtf   
Currently the list includes articles from CQ, CQ VHF, QST, and The AMSAT  
Journal.  Please contact me directly if you have additional suggestions.  


Expedition 17 on orbit:
Sergei Volkov 
Oleg  Kononenko RN3DX
Gregory Chamitoff KD5PKZ

Exp. 18 on  orbit:
Michael Fincke KE5AIT
Salizhan Sharipov

Space Flight  Participant on orbit:
Richard Garriott W5KWQ


To let  you in on how tough it is to schedule contacts, here are some of the  
constraints the ARISS mentors must work under: 
Each Increment is 26  weeks in length. 

For any given expedition, we typically may not  schedule:
1. Anything the first 3 weeks.
2. During EVA weeks 
3. at  least 2 weeks prior to the Increment change. 
4. no contacts during meal and  exercise periods.
5. no contacts during post-sleep and pre sleep (before  08:00 UTC and after 
19:30 UTC)
6. contacts on the day of Progress docking or  undocking are circumspect.


Mike Fincke KE5AIT and Gennady  Padalka RN3DT produced a video during their 
stay on Expedition 9. You can get  the QuickTime version (209MB) or the Windows 
Media version (152MB). These files  are huge, so only a broadband connection 
is recommended.     Thanks Mike and Gennady!   

QuickTime:
http://www.amsat.org/amsat/ariss/Video/Expedition9Tour.mov
Windows  Media:
http://www.amsat.org/amsat/ariss/Video/Expedition9tourwmv.wmv


A  discussion on Doppler correction and the ISS frequencies may be found  at

http://www.amsat.org/amsat/ariss/news/ISS_frequencies_and_Doppler_correction.r
tf

This  file was updated 2005-07-29 04:00  UTC


*********************************
**********************************************
ADDITIONAL  INSTRUCTIONS FOR AUDIO STREAMING THAT IS PROVIDED BY Verizon  
Business.
1.        Go to designated  homepage URL.
2.        Click on  Audioconferencing.
3.        Click on  Audio Streaming.
4.        Click on  Join.
5.        Enter conference meeting  number.
6.        Enter passcode (case  sensitive) and there are 11 letters max.   
7.        Enter  name.
8.        Enter email  address.
9.        Enter company, use  ARISS or AMSAT if you want.
10.    Enter title  (optional).
11.    Agree to agreement  policy.
12.    Click proceed.
13.    Wait  for contact to start.  If you are there too early, then you will 
probably  hear music.  Contact streaming should start approximately 6 minutes 
before  AOS.

ADDITIONAL NOTES ON THE USE OF IRLP, ECHOLINK, and Webcast.  
IRLP website at: 
http://www.discoveryreflector.ca 
If using IRLP is  more convenient for you than using EchoLink, please  
connect to the  IRLP reflector 9010.  

The Discovery 9010 Reflector also has  streaming audio available.  Once on
the main page, select “audio  library” on the left sidebar.  The prompt
to join the audio stream is  posted at the top of this page.

More directly, you can go to  
http://www.discoveryreflector.ca:8000/listen.pls  

The audio  stream will be delayed. 

Additional information on the IRLP  Discovery Reflector requirements:
The use of the Discovery Reflector requires  that your audio player have 
ability to play a pls file.  Confirm that  your player has that file.  You 
should also confirm that port 8080 is open  to allow the audio stream.

Here is how to check  Realplayer:
1.  Open up Realplayer
2.   Tools>Preferences>Content Media Types> click on Select located under  
the Manual button.  
You should see .pls as one of the accepted  files

Here is how to check Winamp:
1.  Open up  Winamp
2.  Options>preference>General preference>file  types
You should see pls as one of the accepted files

Additional  information may be found on the amsat.org calendar of events for 
where to find  the audio on EchoLink, IRLP and Shoutcast.


Please give  the EchoLInk EDU_NET server your preference over the EchoLink 
AMSAT server  for your connection. This will keep the load light on the 
AMSAT server,  assuring us of better audio quality all around.

You can connect to  the AMSAT Conference Room server at node 101377.
Audio is also available at  times on the JK1ZRW server at node 277208. Please 
connect to the *JK1ZRW* server  to keep the load light on the *AMSAT* server. 
 This will ensure good audio  quality for all listeners.

For latest information on ISS - school  contact audio feeds into EchoLink, 
please check the AMSAT calendar of events  at:

http://www.amsat.org/amsat-new/fieldops/events.php

Simulation  contacts are terrestrial contacts that provide training for the 
astronauts on  the use of the ARISS equipment before going on orbit.   



Budbrooke Primary School, Warwick, England,  direct via GB4OBS
Contact is a go for Fri 2008-10-17 11:06 UTC 78 deg  
Watch saved video stream at http://www.batc.tv   (***)
Congratulations to Budbrooke Primary School and Richard Garriott W5KWQ!  (***)


Proposed questions for Budbrooke Primary  School:
1. Sunrise and Sunset can be amazing sights on earth - what do they  look 
like from space?
2. Is it hot in space?
3. What do you do with all  your rubbish in space - do you recycle and if so 
how?
4. What is your  favourite thing to do on the space station?
5. How can you do exercise in  space to keep fit?
6. Why is there zero gravity in space?
7. Can plants  grow on the space station - if so what is growing at the 
moment?
8. Is it  harder to concentrate in space than on Earth?
9. What is the most dangerous  job on the space station and why?
10. Do you ever feel dizzy in space?
11.  How did it feel when the rocket lifted off the ground?
12. What do the stars  look like when you're in space?
13. What do you do for entertainment on the  space station?
14. From the space station, can you see the moon rise and set  just like we 
see it on earth?
15. What do you miss the most about home whilst  you are in space?
16. Who would treat you if you were ill in space?
17.  What is the largest number of people allowed on one trip to the Space  
Station?
18. I have always wanted to be an astronaut.  What do I need to  do to become 
one?
19. Our school is 40 years old this year.  Do you  think there will still be 
a space station in another 40 years?
20. Can you  take a picture of Budbrooke School as you pass overhead and 
bring it to our  school?


Combined group of Challenger Learning Centers,  telebridge via W6SRJ
Indianapolis Challenger Learning Center (Indianapolis,  IN)
Challenger Learning Center at Paducah (Paducah, KY)
Challenger  Learning Center—St. Louis (St. Louis, MO)
Challenger Learning Center of  Colorado (Colorado Springs, CO)
Contact was successful for: Fri 2008-10-17  15:31 UTC 31 deg  (***)
Congratulations to all of the Challenger Centers  and Richard Garriott W5KWQ! 
(***)

Proposed questions: 
1. Does  underwater training accurately simulate working in space? 
2. What kinds and  types of machinery do you use in space?  
3. Do you work with a partner  in space? If so, how do you work together?  
4. Does an astronaut’s  physical fitness need to be similar to that of a 
professional  athlete?    
5. What was the take off like?  
6. How  can you tell when a day passes in space?  
7. Does your gaming  background & experience help with your Space Station 
tasks? 
8. What kind  of experiments do you do?  
9. What do you do all day in space? 
10.  Do astronauts generally use HAM radios to communicate in space? 
11. What  made you want to go to the International Space Station and talk to 
students in  the USA? 
12. What do you like most about space?  
13. Does a  candidate have to have a college degree to be an astronaut? 
14. How do you  get reception in outer space for making phone calls and 
communicating with NASA?  
15. What does it feel like to float in space? 


Austin  Liberal Arts and Sciences Academy, Austin, TX, direct via K5LBJ
Contact is a  go for: Sun 2008-10-19 13:15 UTC 47 deg 

Proposed questions for Austin Liberal Arts and Sciences Academy:&  
1. How has your personal  experience as the sixth private space traveler 
affected your business model for  encouraging future private trips to space?
2. Is there anything you miss  about being on Earth?
3. What about being on the ISS has surprised you the  most?
4. Did you have any space sickness, and, if so, what were your  symptoms, and 
how long did it last?
5. What is the longest stretch of time  that you would want to stay in space?
6. What will you miss the most about  being on the ISS after your return to 
Earth?
7. What personal mementos did  you take to the ISS to remember the trip after 
your return to Earth?
8. Do  you think people will live on Space Stations one day?
9. Now that you’re on  the ISS, did you leave anything on earth that you wish 
you had brought with  you?
10. How do you regulate the temperature and humidity inside the ISS, and  do 
you and your crewmates agree on the settings?
11. You have been using your  trip as a means to publicize the space program 
and make it “cool” again. What  lessons have you learned about revamping the 
public’s opinion of space travel  that NASA could use to gain public support?
12. What is the most impressive  thing you have seen thus far from space?
13. Since your father was an  astronaut, what advice, if any, did he give you 
for the trip to the ISS, and  what advice would you give others that follow 
in your footsteps?
14. How do  you feel knowing that you are away from your family and all forms 
of  media?
15. Can you describe the ISS for us, letting us know about the number  of 
windows and the noise levels?
16. What is the neatest thing that you have  done while weightless?
17. When do you think kids will be allowed to go to a  Space Station?
18. What do you want people to remember most about your trip  to space?
19. What are you doing during your free time while on the  ISS?
20. Do you feel fluent enough in other languages to communicate in an  
emergency aboard the ISS?



Pinehurst School,  Ashland, Oregon, telebridge via W6SRJ and WH6PN
Contact is a go for : Mon  2008-10-20 15:06 UTC via WH6PN and then handover 
to 15:14 UTC 54 deg via  W6SRJ

Proposed questions for Pinehurst School:
1. What is your  first thought when you looked back at earth?
2. Can you see other planets  from the Space Station?
3. What do you think when you wake up?
4. What  food do you miss the most?
5. Can you see the sunrise and sunset at the same  time?
6. Someday I would like go be on the Space Shuttle.  How are  people chosen 
to go on the Space Shuttle?
7. What do you do if someone  becomes ill or is hurt?
8. What has been your greatest moment on this  flight?
9. What was your moment of greatest fear?
10. Do you get rocket  sick?
11. What do you when you look out the window right now?
12. How did  travel into space change your life?
13. How long have you lived in  space?
14. Is it hard to get dressed?
15. How do you escape when there is  a meteorite hurtling toward you?
16. How many people are there?
17. What  is the scariest part of your mission?
18. Do you miss the earth?
19. Who  do you communicate with back on earth?
20. Who are your friends on the Space  Station?
21. How do you cook your food?
22. How high can you jump?
23.  Are there any rooms where you can walk normally?
24. Have you bumped your  head while floating around?

National Planetarium, Kuala Lumpur,  Malaysia, direct via 9M2RPN
Contact is a go for: Tues 2008-10-21 08:30 UTC 30  deg 

Proposed questions for National Planetarium (***)
1. How  are you adapting to zero gravity?
2. When you have achieved orbit, what is  the first thing that you do?
3. Do you feel day and night in space?
4. How  long did you take for your journey from earth to space?
5. What was your  feeling to go in space successfully?
6. Is there a bathing roaster for the  crew?
7. Were your feelings when you were launched into space?
8. In the  journey from earth to the ISS, when was the most stressful time?
9. What time  zone do you observe in space?
10. Which is the largest man made object that  you can see?
11. Have you seen other planets besides Earth?
12. How big is  the ISS?
13. Do you see any meteoroids from the ISS?
14. How does the sun  look like from the ISS?
15. Is it always dark in outer space?
16. Is it  hard to sleep in space?
17. Do you have your own room in space?
18. How  does one get treated for a sudden sickness in space?
19. How is the  temperature in the space station controlled? Does it get too 
hot or too  cold?
20. How is air and water in the ISS  recycled?


Armada Area Schools, Armada, Michigan, direct  via K8UO 
Contact is a go for: Fri 2008-10-24 17:13 UTC 58 deg   (***)

Proposed questions for Armada Area Schools:
1. What kind  of fuel does the space shuttle use?
2. If there isn’t a space shuttle  available, do you have an escape plan if 
you have to evacuate the space  station?
3. How big is the space station and how large will it be when it is  finished?
4. Are you able to watch television on the space station?
5. How  do you deal with the after effects of living in a weightless 
environment for  extended periods of time?
6. How hot does it get inside the space shuttle  during re-entry?
7. What supplies do you need in space?
8. If I wanted to  go into the field of aerospace, what would I have to do 
now to fulfill this  goal?
9. How many people can live on the space station at one time?
10.  What do you miss most when you are in space?
11. What is going through your  mind as you are traveling away from Earth?
12. Are you able to see weather  changes that happen on Earth from the space 
station?
13. How much fuel does  the space shuttle hold?
14. Will the space shuttle survive if the Earth is  destroyed?
15. How often do they change astronauts on the space  station?
16. Who or what inspired you to be an astronaut?
17. How does  NASA choose which astronauts will go on a mission?
18. How long does it take  to get to the space station and once you are there 
how would you get  inside?
19. What personal items are you allowed to bring with you in  space?
20. How are you able to wash your hands or take a shower in  space?


Scuola Media Statale  Donato Forlani I-70014  Conversano, Italy, direct via 
IZ7MKW
Contact is a go for:  Tue  2008-10-28 09:37 UTC 34 deg (***)

Proposed questions for Scuola  Media Statale: 
1. What is the most ambitious spatial project for the future?  
2. What do you see at the moment when you are looking outside the ISS?  
3. How does it feel to be in space? 
4. Is it difficult to get used to  zero gravity? 
5. What do you think about extraterrestrial life in the  universe? 
6. How many years ago did you start your career as astronaut?  
7. What studies are necessary to become an astronaut? 
8. Where does the  electric power come from on board the ISS? 
9. Was it your childhood dream to  become an astronaut? 
10. At what age did you discover your passion for  space? 
11. What do you miss most from Earth during the mission? 
12. How  long can a human being stay in orbit without any physical problems? 
13. What  happens if an astronaut gets seriously ill in space? 
14. What do you think  about future projects of living on the moon? 
15. What systems do you use for  the communication to the Earth? 
16. Is there any danger for the ISS module  to be hit by Space debris? 
17. How are the daily astronauts´ duties  organized on board the ISS? 
18. What kind of optical instruments have you on  board to watch the space? 
19. What are the main scientific experiments  during Expedition 17? 
20. What are the minimum and maximum temperatures  inside and outside the 
ISS? 



Santa Teresa del  Bambin Gesù Rome 00165, Italy,  direct via IK0US0 (***)
Contact is a go  for: Thu 2008-10-30 08:51 UTC 44 deg (***)



IES  Trassierra, Córdoba, Spain-14011, direct via EA7URC
TBD  UTC

Proposed questions for IES Trassierra:
1. What kind of food  do you eat? Have you got a special diet?
2. Are you in contact with your  family?
3. How long have you been in the ISS?
4. What do you miss  most?
5. How long does it take to go to space?
6. What is your favourite  thing up there?
7. Have you ever felt frightened?
8. What is the weight of  you space-suit?
9. What is your mission onboard?
10. How do you have a  shower?
11. What have you studied to be an Astronaut?
12. When are you  coming back?
13. How long are you going to be in space?
14. What is the  temperature in the ISS?
15. How is it like to live in the ISS?
16. What do  you do in your free time?
17. How do you drink?
18. What is the most  important thing you have done in the ISS?
19. What is your position at this  moment relative to the earth?
20. How do you go to the  toilet?


St. Thomas' Primary School, Brisbane, Queensland,  Australia, direct via 
VK4HBK
TBD UTC

Dibrugarh University,  India
TBD UTC 

Anderson's Creek, Primary School, Warrandyte,  Victoria, Australia, 
telebridge via TBD
TBD UTC

Mugegawa Junior  High School, Seki, Gifu, Japan, direct via TBD
TBD UTC

St.  Teresa's School, South Wairarapa, New Zealand, telebridge via TBD
TBD  UTC

Wairarapa Home School Association, Carterton, Wairarapa, New  Zealand,  
telebridge via TBD
TBD UTC

International  Education Week
TBD UTC

CERAM EAI RUE Albert Einstein Sophia  Antipolis F-06902 France, telebridge 
via TBD
TBD  (UTC)

Alexandroupolis School of Special Education and 11th  Alexandroupolis Primary 
School, Alexandroupolis Greece-68100 , direct via TBD  
TBD UTC

St Anthony's College, India
TBD  UTC

Quispamsis Elementary/ Middle School, Quispamsis, New  Brunswick, Canada, 
direct via VE9LC
TBD UTC

Stephen F. Austin  Elementary School, Richmond, Texas, direct via NT5SM (or 
special call)
TBD  UTC

Istituto  Comprensivo “Marco  Polo“ , Grado I-34073,  Italy, via IV3YZB (***)
TBD UTC

2 Circolo Didattico,  San  Giuseppe, Mola di Bari, Italy, direct via IZ7EVR
TBD UTC

King  George Elementary School, Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, Canada, direct via  
VE5MC
TBD UTC

1 Circolo Didattico G.Marconi, Casamassima,  I-70010, Italy, direct via IZ7EVR
TBD UTC

Aaxam Jatiya  Vidyalaya, India
TBD UTC

Erie Planetarium, Erie, PA 
TBD  UTC

South Park Elementary, South Park, PA
TBD  UTC

St. John's High School, Chandigarh, UT, India, via TBD
TBD  UTC


DaVinci Discovery Center of Science and Technology,  Allentown, PA, via TBD
TBD UTC 

Proposed questions for DaVinci  Discovery Center of Science and Technology: 
1. Did you fix anything while  you were in space?  If so, what?
2. Is there a special camera that you  have to use and how well does it work?
3. How long you do you think it will  be until there are long-term living 
quarters in space?
4. Does it feel any  different in space than in under water training?
5. How do you keep oxygen on  the space station since there isn’t any in 
space?
6. Do plants grow  differently in space and how do you water them?
7. How much would a hundred  pound astronaut weigh on the moon?
8. Will people who are not trained  astronauts be able to go onto the 
International Space Station?
9. How do you  do things like eating and sleeping without gravity?
10. How do you stop loss  of bone mass on a mission?
11. How is the space station powered?
12. Is  the space station big enough for you to have private space when 
people get on  your nerves?
13. Has there ever been a serious medical problem on the space  shuttle and 
how did you solve the problem?
14. If a space rock the size of a  football were to hit the station what 
would happen?
15. How do you protect  yourself from cosmic radiation?
16. Do you want to be involved with the  mission to Mars and why?
17. When you were a child did you want to become an  astronaut and why?
18. How did you feel the first time you saw Earth from  space?
19. Do you ever worry that you might not come back to see your loved  ones?
20. Why did you become an astronaut since there is a risk of  dying?
21. Do you believe in intelligent alien  life?






Currently  the ARISS operations team has a list of 60 schools that we 
hope will be able  to have a contact during 2008.   As the schedule becomes 
more  solidified, we will be letting everyone know.  Current plans call for an  
average of one scheduled school contact per week.

73,
Charlie  Sufana AJ9N
One of the ARISS operation team mentors

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