[Date Prev][Date Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next] - [Date Index][Thread Index][Author Index]

Re: how to fix the shuttle fuel tank



Second try ( I think NASCAR makes more sense, Nasser, I believe was a
President of Egypt and a Ford Dealer somewhere in my past life, not that
either wouldn't care)......

Remember..these are the same guys who knew the critical foam areas last
time, researched the problem, decided they couldn't do anything so flew with
the same configuration this time....

Result...more foam fell off from one of their critical points...

Maybe you should have suggested duct tape, at least they wouldn't have had
to think much, and I believe Nascar has it certified to 250 MPH.

Roger
WA1KAT

----- Original Message ----- 
From: "MM" <ka1rrw@yahoo.com>
To: "MM" <ka1rrw@yahoo.com>; "Dave Larsen PhD" <doc@volcano.net>;
<sarex@amsat.org>
Sent: Wednesday, August 17, 2005 11:00 AM
Subject: Re: [sarex] how to fix the shuttle fuel tank


> It looks like the NET idea has finally made it to
> nasa.
> here is a copy of one the responses.
> I get a kick out of the "Several years to certify".
>
> This is kinda like, when IBM was asked how long
> it would take to make the PC, they responded,
> "It takes us a year just to designe the box"
>
> Lets hire Dick Rutan.
>
>
>
> From the nasa web page.
> Why doesn't NASA apply paint, a cover, or net over the
> tank?
>
> One might remember that we painted the first couple of
> External Tanks with white paint in the early 1980's.
> In both cases, we had a significant amount of foam
> loss during ascent. Although at face value applying a
> net or some other foam entrapping method to the
> External Tank sounds easy, it is not without concern.
> After careful examination of this approach, NASA's
> conclusion is that portions of the net could become in
> itself an undesirable debris source. Depending on the
> material used (Kevlar, aluminum, etc.), the density of
> the netting material would present a more critical
> debris source than foam to the Orbiter Thermal
> Protection System. Through a rigid certification
> process, we would also have to understand if and when
> the netting material could come off and in what
> quantities or mass that the netting material could
> present. Our assessment is that the process of
> certifying a netting material for flight would take
> several years and would not be available until late in
> the Space Shuttle Program life. NASA's goal remains to
> eliminate the potential for critical debris from all
> sources, including the External Tank foam.
>
> --- MM <ka1rrw@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
> > Quote from nasa:
> > Bill Gerstenmaier, the senior NASA official leading
> > the
> > investigation into Discovery's foam loss incidents,
> > said Thursday that engineers so far have found no
> > solutions to the problem.
> >
> >
> > Suggestion from the crowd
> >
> > Just wrap a big dacron mesh stocking around the tank
> > and sew it tight.  Half inch mesh should work.
> > And if you want to test it, just wrap the mesh on
> > an SR-71 and take it to Mach 3 to see if it stays
> > on.
> >
> > Miles
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > ____________________________________________________
> > Start your day with Yahoo! - make it your home page
> > http://www.yahoo.com/r/hs
> > ----
> > Via the sarex mailing list at AMSAT.ORG courtesy of
> > AMSAT-NA.
> > To unsubscribe, send "unsubscribe sarex" to
> > Majordomo@amsat.org
> Tired of spam?  Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
> http://mail.yahoo.com
> ----
> Via the sarex mailing list at AMSAT.ORG courtesy of AMSAT-NA.
> To unsubscribe, send "unsubscribe sarex" to Majordomo@amsat.org
----
Via the sarex mailing list at AMSAT.ORG courtesy of AMSAT-NA.
To unsubscribe, send "unsubscribe sarex" to Majordomo@amsat.org



AMSAT Top AMSAT Home