[Date Prev][Date Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next] - [Date Index][Thread Index][Author Index]

Fw: NASA HSF News Digest V1 #21




Submitted by Arthur - N1ORC

	STS-109 Mission Status Report #15
	STS-109 Mission Status Report #16
	2002 International Space Station Status Report #13

Date: Thu, 7 Mar 2002 22:38:45 -0600 (CST)
From: info@jsc.nasa.gov
Subject: STS-109 Mission Status Report #15

STS-109
Report # 15 
 Thursday, March 7, 2002 - 10:30 p.m. CST 
 
 The crew of the space shuttle Columbia will give Hubble a way to open
one of its slumbering eyes during the fifth and final scheduled spacewalk
of this mission.  An experimental cooling system will be installed on a
camera that has been dormant since 1999 in hopes of bringing it back to
life. 

The crew onboard Columbia was awakened at 9:52 p.m. CST by the Mission
Impossible: II  theme song, performed by Limp Bizkit.

Astronauts John Grunsfeld and Rick Linnehan plan to step out into the
shuttle’s payload bay about 2:30 a.m. CST Friday. The objective of the 6
1/2 hour spacewalk is to install the Near-Infrared Camera and
Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) Cooling System.

NICMOS was installed on the second servicing mission to Hubble in 1997. 
The camera operated at extremely low temperatures and its solid-nitrogen
cooling block was depleted earlier than expected. Engineers hope the new
neon gas cooling system will restore the cold temperatures necessary for
the camera to operate.

For the installation, Nancy Currie will give Grunsfeld a ride on the
shuttle’s robotic arm to the aft shroud doors, which he  will open. These
doors are on the opposite side of the telescope from where spacewalkers
Mike Massimino and Jim Newman worked on Thursday.

Grunsfeld will then retrieve the NICMOS Cryogenic Cooler from the
shuttle's payload bay and both spacewalkers will install the unit inside
the telescope. After switching places on the arm Grunsfeld will close the
left aft shroud door and Linnehan will move to the payload bay to remove
the NICMOS Cooling System Radiator from its carrier. Together, they will
install the radiator on the outside of Hubble.  Linnehan will feed wires
from the radiator through the bottom of the telescope to Grunsfeld,
located inside Hubble, who will make the necessary connections to NICMOS.
They will then close both aft shroud doors and perform the final
activities of the spacewalk to prepare the shuttle payload bay for
landing.

Commander Scott Altman and Pilot Duane Carey will provide photo and video
documentation of this last spacewalk from inside the shuttle.

After the spacewalk, Columbia’s smallest steering jets will be employed
to boost the shuttle and Hubble’s orbit.  With the payload bay facing the
direction of travel, the shuttle's vernier jets will be fired in a series
of pulses, lasting about 36 minutes. The reboost will increase the
shuttle and Hubble’s orbit by about 7.5 statute miles.  

The crew is to begin its sleep period at 1:52 p.m. CST Friday. The next
STS-109 mission status report will be issued Friday morning or as events
warrant.




Date: Fri, 8 Mar 2002 15:24:55 -0600 (CST)
From: info@jsc.nasa.gov
Subject: STS-109 Mission Status Report #16

STS-109
Report # 16 
 Friday, March 8, 2002 - 2:30 p.m. CST 
 
 The crew of the space shuttle Columbia completed the last of its five
ambitious spacewalks this morning with the successful installation of an
experimental cooling system for Hubble’s Near-Infrared Camera and
Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS). The NICMOS has been dormant since
January 1999 when its original coolant ran out. 

Astronauts John Grunsfeld and Rick Linnehan began their third spacewalk
of the mission at 2:46 a.m. CST. Linnehan was given a ride on the
shuttle’s robotic arm to the aft shroud doors by Nancy Currie, working
from the aft flight deck of Columbia. After the shroud doors were open,
Linnehan was moved back to Columbia’s payload bay to remove the NICMOS
cryocooler from its carrier. Grunsfeld and Linnehan then installed the
cryocooler inside the aft shroud and connected cables from its
Electronics Support Module. That module was installed yesterday during a
spacewalk by Jim Newman and Mike Massimino.

Next, with Grunsfeld on the end of the shuttle’s robotic arm, the Cooling
System Radiator was retrieved from its carrier in Columbia’s payload bat
and installed on the outside of Hubble. Linnehan fed wires from the
radiator through the bottom of the telescope to Grunsfeld, who made the
necessary connections to NICMOS. After ensuring that all the cables were
properly connected and stowed, the pair closed both aft shroud doors and
performed the final activities of the spacewalk to prepare the shuttle
payload bay for landing.

Commander Scott Altman and Pilot Duane Carey provided photo and video
documentation of the last spacewalk from inside the shuttle.

Initial tests of the new cooling system by the Space Telescope Operations
Control Center in Greenbelt, Md. have all gone very well. NICMOS was
originally installed on the second servicing mission to Hubble in 1997.
The camera requires extremely low temperatures, but its solid-nitrogen
cooling block was depleted earlier than expected. Engineers hope the new
neon gas cooling system will restore the cold temperatures necessary for
the camera to operate.

About an hour after the spacewalk, at 11:18 a.m., Columbia’s smallest
steering jets were fired for 36 minutes to boost the shuttle and Hubble’s
orbit by four statute miles. This reboost places Hubble in the proper
orbit for its deployment from Columbia’s payload bay early Saturday
morning.

The crew began its sleep period at 1:52 p.m. and is scheduled to awaken
at 9:52 p.m. The next STS-109 mission status report will be issued Friday
evening or as events warrant.


Date: Fri, 8 Mar 2002 16:38:58 -0600 (CST)
From: info@jsc.nasa.gov
Subject: 2002 International Space Station Status Report #13

2002
Report # 13 
 4 p.m. CST, Friday, March 8, 2002 
 Mission Control Center, Houston, Texas 
 
 Science experiments and robotic arm operations were the focus for
Expedition Four Commander Yury Onufrienko and Flight Engineers Dan Bursch
and Carl Walz  aboard the International Space Station this week.

The crew began the week by bringing the Active Rack Isolation System back
to life after installing a new shock absorber in the rack. One of the
eight pushrods that was not operating correctly was replaced by the crew.
The system works to dampen out the vibrations generated by crews’
movement throughout the station. Those vibrations could affect the
delicate science experiments located inside the rack. Air and water
samples were taken from the Advanced Astroculture experiment inside the
US Destiny laboratory. The samples will be brought back to Earth for
scientists to study. Scientists hope to determine what nutrients and
conditions are necessary for plants to grow in microgravity. The Earthkam
experiment was activated once again this week. The crew set up a digital
camera in the window of Destiny, enabling middle school students on the
ground to remotely take pictures of the Earth’s geographical features
from a vantage point 240 statue miles high. 

To prepare for the Earthkam activation, the station’s robotic arm was
moved Tuesday so it would not block the view of Earth from the Destiny
lab. The crew could not release the brakes to begin the move using the
arm's primary avionics system. The secondary avionics system operated
normally, however, and was used to perform the move. The specific cause
of the problem with the primary avionics system is still being
investigated.

Thursday, the crew put the arm through a practice run of the movements it
will make during the next shuttle mission to the station, STS-110 in 
April. The arm will be used to attach the next major station component,
the S0 truss. On Thursday, ground controllers also sent up tests for the
primary and secondary computer workstations used to operate the arm. The
secondary workstation was not able to boot up during the test, and
engineers are evaluating it. When the workstation difficulties were
encountered, the arm was left in a safe parked position while engineers
study the problem. 

Information on the crew’s activities aboard the space station, future
launch dates, as well as station sighting opportunities from anywhere on
the Earth, is available on the Internet at:

http://spaceflight.nasa.gov

Details on station science operations can be found on an Internet site
administered by the Payload Operations Center at NASA's Marshall Space
Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., at:

http://www.scipoc.msfc.nasa.gov

The next ISS status report will be issued March 15, or sooner, if
developments warrant.






________________________________________________________________
GET INTERNET ACCESS FROM JUNO!
Juno offers FREE or PREMIUM Internet access for less!
Join Juno today!  For your FREE software, visit:
http://dl.www.juno.com/get/web/.
----
Via the sarex mailing list at AMSAT.ORG courtesy of AMSAT-NA.
To unsubscribe, send "unsubscribe sarex" to Majordomo@amsat.org



AMSAT Top AMSAT Home