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Fw: NASA HSF News Digest V1 #20



Submitted by Arthur - N1ORC

	STS-109 Mission Status Report #13
	STS-109 Mission Status Report #14



STS-109
Report # 13 
 Wednesday, March 6, 2002 - 10:30 p.m. CST 
 
 With a new heart beating strong and new power generating arrays ready to
convert sunlight into energy, the Hubble Space Telescope is poised for
Columbia’s astronauts to improve its vision.  

Spacewalkers Jim Newman and Mike Massimino are ready to begin the first
science instrument upgrade of the servicing mission when they step
outside about 2:30 a.m. CST Thursday. The fourth of five spacewalks to
rejuvenate Hubble will feature installation of the Advanced Camera for
Surveys, which will see far beyond the reach of current instruments. The
final original science instrument remaining on the telescope, the Faint
Object Camera, will be removed to make room for the advanced system.

Columbia’s crew - Commander Scott Altman, Pilot Duane Carey and mission
specialists Nancy Currie, John Grunsfeld, Rick Linnehan, Newman and
Massimino - was awakened at 9:52 p.m. CST.  The original song “Sittin on
Top of the World,” played for the wakeup, was recorded and dedicated to
the STS-109 crew by Les Paul, a music pioneer and space enthusiast.

Currie will operate the shuttle robot arm to provide transportation to
and from the telescope worksites during the spacewalk.  Newman will be
lifted to Hubble's aft shroud doors where he will meet Massimino, remove
the Faint Object Camera and temporarily stow it on the aft fixture of the
enclosure holding the new instrument in Columbia's cargo bay. Together
they will then unlatch the new camera from its carrier in the shuttle
payload bay and install it in the aft shroud of the telescope. Once that
is completed, they will stow the old camera in the payload bay carrier
for return to Earth.  

Massimino will then take a turn on the robotic arm, and the duo will
install an Electronic Support Module for a new experimental cooling
device to be installed on the fifth spacewalk for the telescope's
Near-Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer. They also will
perform a few remaining cleanup tasks from Wednesday’s power control unit
installation.

Fellow spacewalkers Grunsfeld and Linnehan will be working inside the
shuttle to choreograph the excursion as Altman and Carey provide photo
and video documentation of the spacewalk.

Functionality tests continue and already have been fully successful on
all of Hubble’s major systems that were powered down for the third
spacewalk. Functional tests of the telescope's scientific instruments
will not be completed until after the telescope is released from Columbia
and its aperture door is opened, allowing it to again view the heavens.

The crew is to begin its sleep period at 1:52 p.m. CST Thursday.  The
next STS-109 mission status report will be issued Thursday morning, or as
events warrant.


Date: Thu, 7 Mar 2002 14:29:13 -0600 (CST)
From: info@jsc.nasa.gov
Subject: STS-109 Mission Status Report #14

STS-109
Report # 14 
 Thursday, March 7, 2002  – 2:30 p.m. CST

 
 
 Following today’s successful installation of the new Advanced Camera for
Surveys (ACS) on the Hubble Space Telescope, scientists will be able to
see farther into our universe and with greater clarity and speed than
ever before.

Columbia’s spacewalkers, Jim Newman and Mike Massimino, began the first
science instrument upgrade of this servicing mission at 3 a.m. central
time. The duo, with Newman on the shuttle’s robotic arm, began by
removing the last of Hubble’s original science instruments, the Faint
Object Camera to make room for the ACS.  Newman and Massimino first
opened Hubble’s aft shroud doors, removing the Faint Object Camera and
temporarily stowing it at the edge of Columbia’s payload bay. After
installing the ACS in the Hubble, Newman and Massimino stowed the old
camera in the payload bay for its return to Earth.  

Then Massimino, on the shuttle’s robotic arm, installed the Electronic
Support Module in the aft shroud, with Newman’s assistance. That module
will support a new experimental cooling system to be installed during
tomorrow’s fifth and final scheduled spacewalk of the mission. That
cooling system is designed to bring the telescope's Near-Infrared Camera
and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) back to life. 

Finally, Newman and Massimino completed some remaining cleanup tasks from
yesterday’s Power Control Unit installation. 

During the first half of the spacewalk, mission specialist Nancy Currie
operated the shuttle’s robotic arm, providing transportation to and from
the various worksites on both the Hubble and in  Columbia’s payload bay –
Commander Scott Altman then took over operation of the arm to maneuver
Massimino through his tasks.

Fellow spacewalkers John Grunsfeld and Rick Linnehan worked from inside
the shuttle to choreograph the spacewalk, as Altman and Pilot Duane Carey
continued to provide photo and video documentation of the work.

Initial functional tests on the ACS and the electronics module conducted
by the Space Telescope Operations Control Center in Greenbelt, Md. were
both good. Functional tests of the telescope's scientific instruments
will not be completed, however, until after the telescope is released
from Columbia and its aperture door is opened. 

The crew is to begin its sleep period at 2:52 p.m. CST. The next STS-109
mission status report will be issued Thursday evening following crew
wake-up, or as events warrant.






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