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Future Shuttle ISS Keps






---------------------- Forwarded by Miles Mann/PicTel on 11/09/98 01:32 PM
---------------------------


Miles Mann
11/09/98 01:22 PM

To:   "Greene, Peter " <Peter.Greene@ccmail.l-3com.com>
cc:
Subject:  Future Shuttle ISS Keps  (Document link not converted)



Beginning around November 20, the Russians will launch the first module for
ISS (Zarya control module).
The Zarya is scheduled for launch on a Russian Proton rocket Nov. 20 from
the Baikonur
Cosmodrome, Kazakstan.

A week or two after Zarya is in orbit, the Keps will be readily available
on many web pages.
When a Shuttle is scheduled to deliver parts/modules to ISS, you can used
the ISS keps
to track where the shuttle is going to be located.
The ISS will be flying in a stable orbit.  The drift of ISS will usually be
less than 1 minute per week.
(Except during Engine burns)
When the Shuttle is in the vicinity of ISS, the ISS keps will be good
enough for you to track the shuttle
and maybe even see the Shuttle and ISS fly over head.

The Space shuttle fires it engines frequently during the first two days of
flight to get up into Orbit.
Then during the last two days of a Shuttle mission, the Shuttle again fires
its engines frequently to lower
 its orbit to land.
So, for 4 days the Shuttle is changing orbit too fast for you to keep  your
tracking program up to date.

However during an ISS / Shuttle mission, you will know where the ISS is at
all times.
So just track ISS.

When I ran the First ever Shuttle / Mir School schedule with STS-71, I did
not use Shuttle pre-launch data
to plan the school schedule.  I used the Keps for Mir to plan the time for
the school schedule.
Mir was in a stable orbit with a predictable drift.  Three months before
the school radio schedule
with the crews, we were able to calculate when and where the Mir/Shuttle
would be  on a specific date.
(within a  normal drift window).  The actual date of the schedule was
within 10 minutes of the date
which was predicted 3 months earlier (with InstraTrack).

If you want to plan long range Shuttle visibility schedules for Docking
missions, it is possible to get close results
by using the orbit of the existing (future) space station.







Miles WF1F







"Greene, Peter " <Peter.Greene@ccmail.l-3com.com> on 11/09/98 10:44:00 AM

To:   "\"sarex@AMSAT.Org\" " <sarex@AMSAT.Org>, "\"compute-x@juno.com\" "
      <compute-x@juno.com>
cc:    (bcc: Miles Mann/PicTel)
Subject:  RE: [sarex] Shuttle Keps




STS-96 is not scheduled to launch until 13 May 1999.  Then next
scheduled shuttle launch is STS-88 on 3 December at 0359 EST.  This is
the first launch of International Space Station equipment (American).
The date and time of launch has changed a lot, so it's probably not
worthwhile getting Keps until closer to launch date.

Pete


______________________________ Reply Separator
_________________________________
Subject: [sarex] Shuttle Keps
Author:  "compute-x@juno.com" [SMTP:compute-x@juno.com] at L-3COM-CSE
Date:    11/8/1998 3:05 PM


Are there any keps available yet for for the STS-96 mission on December
6th?

James

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