[Date Prev][Date Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next] - [Date Index][Thread Index][Author Index]

Re: Is Wi-Fi Headed toward an Early Grave?



Hi Trevor,

802.11n, as currently written, also has some qualities that don't work very 
well in the 2.4 ghz band.  A big problem is that to get full bandwidth, 11n 
"bonds" two adjacent channels together, taking up a 40 mhz swath of 
spectrum.  Since for much of the planet the entire band is only 50 mhz wide, 
this means that there is only one high performance channel.  If you have 
several networks nearby (and "nearby" is larger than it was before, as you 
note), then the contention for airtime could be a problem.  The 5 ghz band 
has 23-ish real channels, giving ample space for multiple networks to 
co-exist even at the higher rate.  Channel bonding on 2.4 also tends to take 
out Bluetooth communications.  So, if the bonding stays in the final spec 
next year, I think N will head for 5 ghz, especially in the enterprise space 
where the cost differential for parts isn't as big of a barrier, and take 
the rest of Wi-Fi with it.  Yes, the physics is better for 2.4 for going 
through stuff, but interference will win out here.

But the deciding factor may be in the consumer space.  They are, after all, 
in our back yards (if not in our own living rooms).  I think there are a 
couple of factors that will determine the eventual fate of 2.4 ghz wireless 
communications there.  The big issue here is whether the need for high 
bandwidth home networking will take off.  If it doesn't, we're good.  If it 
does to a limited degree, the channel problem won't count, and then it's 
just a "simple" matter to solve the interoperability problems that plague 
the current crop of products.  The enterprise space should drive that, and 
then we're screwed.  Cheap parts, good physics, lots of bandwidth, but not 
enough congestion to be a (networking) problem.  Worst case scenario.

But, if things take off and everybody has a high bandwidth home network, 
there could be quite a mess for a little while, before the cost premium for 
5 ghz is overtaken by the need for quiet bandwidth and a 
bigger-numbers-is-always-better marketing plan.  Then the rush will be to 5 
ghz, and we'll be left alone.  But, how long can we wait?

The wild card in my opinion is Wi-Max (802.16), which is intended to be the 
"last mile" connection for service prividers.  If this wins, it will be the 
death blow to BPL (Yeah!), and will ease the pressure to blanket Wi-Fi 
across every major city on the planet.  I believe Wi-Max is on licensed 
frequencies outside of the Ham bands, so this would be a really good thing.

At least, that's what my crystal ball says.  But the ball is foggy, and 
having a clear 2.almost-4 ghz allocation across the planet would be a good 
thing in any case.

Greg  KO6TH


----Original Message Follows----
From: Trevor <m5aka@yahoo.co.uk>
To: AMSAT BB <amsat-bb@amsat.org>
Subject: [amsat-bb] Re: Is Wi-Fi Headed toward an Early Grave?
Date: Tue, 12 Dec 2006 22:27:49 +0000 (GMT)

802.11n will increase usage of 2.4 GHz. If you want decent range 2.4 GHz is 
the
band to use not 5 GHz.

We will continue to see increasing use of 2.4 GHz for a whole range of 
consumer
devices.

It's why we need an Amateur Satellite allocation at 2490-2400 MHz in 
addition
to 2400-2402 MHz.

73 Trevor M5AKA

--- Bill Ress <bill@hsmicrowave.com> wrote:

 > Thought I'd pass along an interest article (in PC Magazine) entitled "Is
 > Wi-Fi Headed toward an Early Grave?"
 > _http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,1895,2070360,00.asp
 > _
 > A rather mixed prediction since the article predicts 802.11n will
 > replace WiFi and 802.11n can operate in both 2.4 and 5 GHz allocations.
 >
 > We can only hope that 802.11a (5 GHz) and 802.11n operating at 5 GHz
 > will take some of the heat off our 2.4 GHz band. The 5 GHz allocation
 > offers more immunity to co-interference and allows for higher data
 > rates. Perhaps the availability of still higher data rates will offer
 > incentive (over the long term) to get users to opt for the higher
 > frequency (above 2.4 GHz) networks.
 >
 > Maybe I'm overly optimistic??
 >
 > Regards...Bill - N6GHz
 >
 > _______________________________________________
 > Sent via AMSAT-BB@amsat.org. Opinions expressed are those of the author.
 > Not an AMSAT-NA member? Join now to support the amateur satellite 
program!
 > Subscription settings: http://amsat.org/mailman/listinfo/amsat-bb
 >


Send instant messages to your online friends http://uk.messenger.yahoo.com
_______________________________________________
Sent via AMSAT-BB@amsat.org. Opinions expressed are those of the author.
Not an AMSAT-NA member? Join now to support the amateur satellite program!
Subscription settings: http://amsat.org/mailman/listinfo/amsat-bb

_________________________________________________________________
WIN up to $10,000 in cash or prizes  enter the Microsoft Office Live 
Sweepstakes http://clk.atdmt.com/MRT/go/aub0050001581mrt/direct/01/

_______________________________________________
Sent via AMSAT-BB@amsat.org. Opinions expressed are those of the author.
Not an AMSAT-NA member? Join now to support the amateur satellite program!
Subscription settings: http://amsat.org/mailman/listinfo/amsat-bb


AMSAT Top AMSAT Home