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Re: Operatiing Procedure on HamSat



I'm not so sure.  I have found that when I use computer control
when others are not, I add to the confusion.  Inveribly I end up
retuning to match their down links anyway.  I find it easier at that
point to simply disable automated down link doppler control and
tune by hand.  The up link, which I keep on automated control,
tends to stay close enough to speed up retuning.

On FO-29 if you are using manual tuning you should tune for
your receive to match the other person's voice.  When it's your
turn you re-tune the transmit to sound right on top of the last
receive frequency.  In the case of FO-29 the down link is the
higher frequency, which matches what you said in your message.

This is the way it was described by those who I have talked to
on FO-29 many times.  Those who know more than I.

The best solution I have found, is to learn who uses computer
control and who doesn't - it's a small group of us that use FO-29
on a regular basis.  When in doubt I ask what the other person
is using and try to match them out of courtesy.


-Freeman

Anthony Monteiro wrote:

> Dear friends,
>
> This is a common misconception but it is incorrect.
>
> The purpose of the tuning rules is not to help you make a QSO,
> much like table manners are not intended to help you consume food.
>
> The satellite is a shared resource and it is rude to drift into
> and QRM someone elses QSO. The tuning rules are intended to prevent
> or minimize the drift through the transponder passband that results
> from incorrect tuning.
>
> Stations that tune both the up and downlink to maintain the
> frequency at the satellite will not drift into and QRM
> someone elses QSO. If even one station in a QSO is using computer
> control then, at least while that station is transmitting, both
> stations in the QSO will not be drifting as the non-controlled
> station must tune their receiver to be able to listen and will track
> the correct frequency.
>
> It is always better to use computer control if you can. Besides
> preventing QRM due to drifting, it also reduces QRM due to trying
> to find your own downlink (aka "ditters.")
>
> If you cannot use computer control, it is always better to tune the
> highest frequency link while transmitting in order to minimize the
> drift through the passband. While receiving, you have no choice, you
> have to tune your receiver to listen to the other station if you want
> to hear them.
>
> At this time, tuning rules may seem silly as there is hardly anyone
> using FO-29 but this was not always the case. In the not too distant 
> past,
> the LEO satellite passbands were very crowded, especially on weekends.
>
> Let us try to be considerate and do our best not to interfere with each
> other. If you can, use computor control and help set a good example.
>
> Thanks for bringing this up and 73,
>
> Tony AA2TX
>
> ---
>
> At 09:46 AM 5/11/2005 -0600, you wrote:
>
>> The only problem with the "One True Rule" is it assumes all
>> participates are running with computer control, and this works
>> fine when everyone is.  This rule breaks down quickly when
>> one or more of the participates is adjusting manually.
>>
>> I have seen this often on FO-29, and it's best to switch to manual
>> at that point.
>
> ----
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