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Re: Lightning and neutral grounding



Greg, you have the basic concept correct that you need to tie your 
lightning arrestor ground rod to the electrical ground but do not do 
this inside the house.  This wire may have lots of voltage on it during 
an event and you don't want to start the house on fire.  You need to tie 
these two together outside of the house.  I've got the same problem as 
you in that the service entrance and the shack are on opposite sides of 
the house.  That's OK.  What I did was to lay a #4 bare solid wire and 
ran it from my single point ground around the perimeter of the house and 
tied it to the service entrance ground rod.  Use long radius bends 
around the corners of the house and make sure you do a good job of 
connecting the wire to the rods.  Be careful when working around the 
service entrance ground as the hot incoming wires may be exposed.  Check 
out the technical papers at the Polyphaser web site for more info.  You 
can also drive ground rods around the perimeter of the house and tie 
this wire to those to be really grounded.  Phil  KB9CRY

Greg D. wrote:

> Hi folks,
>
> So, I think I've got this straight, but just to be REALLY sure...
>
> The service entrance for our house is on the opposite side from
> the shack.  It's a standard 220 service, which I believe is two
> phases of 110, with the common (neutral) being grounded at the
> entrance.  The two sides of the service are split randomly around
> the house to balance the load, giving each plug 110v.  The Air
> Conditioner and clothes dryer are wired across both hot leads,
> for the full 220 voltage.
>
> On the opposite side of the house is the shack.  Each of the
> coax cables coming down from the roof-mounted antennas goes
> through a lightning arrestor.  All of the arrestors are mounted
> in an electric service panel box and the whole thing (each
> arrestor and the box itself) are grounded to a pair of 8' ground
> rods spaced about 5' apart.  Leaving the arrestors, the coax
> cables go through a hole in the wall into the shack and to the
> rigs.  The rigs are plugged into the wall plug nearby for power.
>
> So the question:  I believe everything is done more-or-less
> correctly, EXCEPT that I need to tie the neutral of the electrical
> plug in the shack to the same grounded bar that the arrestors are
> bolted to.  "Neutral" is "white wire" side of the plug.  (The hot
> side is black, as in charcoal, which is what happens to your
> finger if you touch it...).  I can't depend on the service entrance
> ground to be at the same potential as the ham ground during a strike,
> since they are too far apart.  The safety ground (green wire) is
> left alone.  This means snaking a heavy wire from the lightning
> arrestor mounting bar, into the wall, and over to the electrical
> outlet box, and attaching it to the neurtal side of that wall plug.
> I don't need any other sort of lightning arrestor on the power line,
> other than a good "surge protector"; our electrical service has an
> underground feed.
>
> Is this correct?
>
> Thanks,
>
> Greg  KO6TH
>
>
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