[Date Prev][Date Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next] - [Date Index][Thread Index][Author Index]

RE: was Arcjet, was solid boosters, now airplanes



Not quite true.  The jet only has to make it to the nearest land,
preferably to a suitable airport.  Thus 2-engine aircraft tend to fly
the North Atlantic, not trans-Pacific.  In fact most of the USA's 747s
have been reallocated to the Pacific while the 757s, 767s, and 777s fly
the Atlantic routes. Russian overflights count as "water" - the planes
should not count on being able to land there, either.

Rick
W2GPS

-----Original Message-----
From: owner-AMSAT-BB@AMSAT.Org [mailto:owner-AMSAT-BB@AMSAT.Org]On
Behalf Of James Sharp
Sent: Monday, June 04, 2001 8:50 PM
To: amsat-bb@AMSAT.Org
Subject: [amsat-bb] was Arcjet, was solid boosters, now airplanes


> > Drw, Your concept is only correct if the plane can fly with just one
engine.
> > I think the end result of going across the ocean without ditching is
much
> > more statically supported with the four engines. What is not
supported is
> > MONEY. It is much cheaper to fly two engines then four. Fuel,
maintance,

The FAA won't type-certify an airliner as capable of transoceanic flight
unless it is capable of making the trip on one engine.

----
Via the amsat-bb mailing list at AMSAT.ORG courtesy of AMSAT-NA.
To unsubscribe, send "unsubscribe amsat-bb" to Majordomo@amsat.org


----
Via the amsat-bb mailing list at AMSAT.ORG courtesy of AMSAT-NA.
To unsubscribe, send "unsubscribe amsat-bb" to Majordomo@amsat.org



AMSAT Top AMSAT Home