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Re: UO-14 on Field Day




 Margaret,


 <snip>

 > That's why there's a regular FD bonus for satellite contacts. That's why
there's
> a bonus for sending a packetgram to your SM. That's why we also encourage
solar
> power, QRP and public demonstrations. If we make being channelmaster on
UO-14
> profitable, by golly, we'll get that too.

 When I was in school not too long ago Bonus Points for exams were
the toughest problems to solve. That is why they called them Bonus
Points. On Field Day, I consider Bonus Points a challenge.  If you meet
the challenge, you get the 100 point prize.  If not, learn from the mistake,
educate yourself on the problem, and change your strategy.


 > I think the rules should at least be changed so as not to *encourage*
making an
> already ridiculously bad FM LEO situation even worse. 1000 people are
obviously
> not going to make QSOs in a single pass. But should 50% of the QSO
particpants
> in one pass be the same station? Should we *reward* that behavior with
contest
> points? I say "no". While a rules change won't solve the structrual
problems, we
> can at least create a disincentive to brute-forcing your way to the top of
the
> FM LEO pile.

 I am trying to determine your end goal.  From what I can tell, your
objective
is to limit contact points to one QSO on the FM satellites like UO-14 and
AO-27.  However, you stated we should not reward a behavior.  Techncally
speaking, the behavior is created as a result of what the contest rewards.

 Rule changes do not change human behavior.  In fact, they may adversely
affect human behaviour since rules tend to create a few rebels.

 Let's say the AMSAT rules for Field Day changed to allow only 1 QSO credit.
Do you honestly think that will stop anyone from making more than one
contact?

 Excuse me for being a realist, I cannot help myself.  They may only get one
point for 20 contacts, but it does not stop them from making multiple
contacts
nor does it discourage them in any way.  This is the reality.

 The QSO rate drops dramatically when there is no target station to call.
Thus, even if you limit the contact to one QSO somebody still has to make a
call to let their presence be known on the bird.  Then, someone who has a
strong signal must respond to that call.  If the initial caller heard them
through all the noise, then and only then can they begin to initate an
exchange.
That takes 3 transmissions at best for the seasoned operators to make a full
contact.  In many cases, this will take at least 4 or more transmissions for
a  full contact using this method to break the QRM barrier.  That is 2X or
more
what it takes for a control station or series of control stations.  Needless
to say, whomever makes a contact then becomes a target for all the other
stations that immediately call who they just heard very clearly.  Then you
hear all the stations calling the stations they just heard.  This becomes
another time slot wasted for a contact until another strong station comes
in and identifies.  In the mean time, you will always have a station calling
over a QSO in progress.  This in turn generates another request to fill the
missing information in the exchange.

 In reality, your stated 50% of QSO participants suffering falls to much
less
than 25% in the scenario described.

 Do not misundertsand me.  I am not advocating control stations one way or
the other on the FM satellites during Field Day.   I am only conveying that
control stations, alligators, or whatever you wish to call them, maximize
the number of contacts that could be realized on an FM satellite.  If there
is
no orderly control, there will be chaos.

 The goal of all these contests, and they are contests, is to make as many
contacts as possible.  That is the root of the problem on the FM satellites.
How can you change the problem when the entire basis of the contest is
to make multiple contacts. This is a problem created by the contest itself
coupled with the shortcomings of an FM satellite during a contest.
Unfortunately, it is ERP and physics that prevail, not operating skill.

 Make no mistake about it, the FM satellites are not suitable for Field Day
operations.




 73's,

 Tim - N8DEU
Huntsville, Alabama




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