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Re: Propellant fluid dynamics at zero-g



I once read somewhere (cobwebs tearing apart here) that on manned (or maybe
it was unmanned) missions, just prior to engine firing, either the thrusters
or the main engine was ramped up with an initial low energy burst in the
direction of flight.  Maybe this happened a split second before a burn at
the desired thrust.  In this manner fuel would be sloshed into proper
position to be fed to the engines properly.  No suggestions here...just
musing.

Gary, N7BRJ/DA1BRJ
----- Original Message -----
From: "Ulf Kumm" <ulf@symek.de>
To: <amsat-bb@AMSAT.Org>
Sent: Tuesday, January 09, 2001 9:58 AM
Subject: Re: [amsat-bb] Propellant fluid dynamics at zero-g


> > Titled "Slosh, rattle and roll,"
>
> Stephen!
>
> I wonder how it is made that the fuel 'finds' the output nozzle
> of the tank in weightlessness.
>
> I've been told, that -before burn- fuel is pressed to circumference
> by spinning the satellite. So, the nozzle must be most distant to
> the spin axis when motor starts.
>
> As soon as the motor runs, the sat is accelerated and the fuel
> will slosh to the 'bottom' of the tank, which is 90 degree apart
> from the nozzle used while ignition.
>
> So, I still wonder how it can be made sure that propellant flows
> without any interruption until the tank is empty.
>
> 73! Ulf, DK9SJ
>
> ----
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