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Re: Not so stupid question



Guys:
I agree with True North.

If you have enough visibility:  Polaris is always within a degree or so of True
North, if you can see it, you can find the tree/whatever that's under it from
your antennas.

The good news:  At least at 2m and 70cm, a degree or 3 of error won't kill you
.. . .

Good luck!

Jim
wb4gcs@amsat.org


Richard W L Limebear wrote:

>  "Timothy S. Zibrat" writes:
>
> > When I align my antennas, do I use magnetic north or true north?
>
> True north.
>
> > If the
> > answer is true north, how do I find my "offset value" to add or subtract
> > from magnetic north?
>
> The gang will probably come up with several answers to this. Good (recent)
> local maps often give the magnetic variation but I used the Moon.
>
> Get a moon tracking program (run IT before Y2K will suffice). Go outside
> and watch the moon. When its directly in line with some local feature, note
> the exact time (I lined it up along the edge of my house). Run the tracking
> program (which gives "true" co-ordinates) and see the azimuth heading for
> that time. Turn your beam to that heading (on the dial) then go and turn
> the antenna mount until it lines up with the selected local feature. Done.
> Make a note of the heading to the feature for future reference.
>
> > Is there any offset for elevation?
>
> No. I heard of magnetic north; never heard of magnetic "up" though.
>
> 73
> Richard W L Limebear G3RWL
> g3rwl@amsat.org
> FOC # 1188
>
>           So many beautiful girls ..... (sob) so little time
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