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Re: More Ado About Nothing



At 01:34 PM 10/26/1999 -0400, Laura Halliday <lha@sdr.utias.utoronto.ca>
wrote:

>A big difference is that in Canada you may listen to anything you
>wish. But except for a handful of exceptions (broadcast, amateur),
>it's illegal to divulge what you hear...

The U.S. Communications Act of 1934 had much the same rules.  It set up the
RF spectrum as a public resource, not government or private property.  The
1934 Act served us well until the 1980s.  Then the cellular industry got
caught with its pants down--it had promised customers that its
communications were private, and any kid with a scanner or UHF TV set could
listen in. 

Rather than keep their promises with encryption technology, the cellular
industry found a cheaper solution.  They lobbied Congress to make cellular
frequencies, in effect, private property with a "No Trespassing" sign.
This set the precedent that led to frequency auctions, and for the
requirement for receiver manufacturers to lock out cellular frequencies.

I'm glad Canada has not yet succumbed to the same thinking.

The Communications Act of 1934's author, by the way, was that flaming pinko
and enemy of Free Enterprise, Herbert Hoover :-)


73 from KD7MW,

--- Peter
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/ b b ,| ,| ,| ,|  ,| ,|  '  ,|   | ,|   |__|__|__|   |__|   |  |   |  |
                                ~'                            ========= 

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