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RE: Antennas vs future



Hi Jeff

The common arrangement you describe  sounds like a *De luxe*
station to me.
If the question is "how much is needed as a minimum" , let me
describe what I personally use for AO-10 contacts:

 - 9 el yagi for downlink and 21 el yagi for uplink in a x configuration (both
antennas on the same boom)
 - no circular polarisation
 - no El rotator, antennas remain horizontal
 - 25 m of low loss coax on VHF
 - same on UHF
 - no VHF preamp
 - 40 W output

This kind of eq. allows me to contact  many W, VE, JA, ZS, ... in CW
when AO-10 is low on the horizon (and some of them in SSB
when they have acute ears).
For sure, a better station is more comfortable, but please
don't frighten the beginners with oversized rigs :-))

See you on AO-10 ?

73 de Jean-Louis F6AGR, near Paris, France


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>8) If gain is required, how much is needed as a minimum to work
>AO-10/Phase 3D when it is at the furthest distance from the earth?

A common arrangement currently in use on AO-10 is 40 elements on 70cm for
the uplink, 18 to 22 elements on the downlink, with a 20dB mast-mounted
preamp on the downlink.  Both antennas circularly polarized, with
polarization switching helpful on the downlink.  Most stations I talk to
on AO-10 tell me they're using 50-100 watts on the uplink.  CW is very
helpful when the satellite is at apogee (furthest distance from the
earth).  And don't forget short runs of low-loss coax (9913 or better) is
needed at these frequencies.

73,
Jeff Sykes K5VU
El Paso, TX



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