AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletin

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE
ANS-122

The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and infor-
mation service of AMSAT North America, The Radio Amateur Satellite
Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in Space
including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur
Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building,
launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio
satellites.

The news feed on http://www.amsat.org publishes news of Amateur
Radio in Space as soon as our volunteers can post it.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to:
ans-editor at amsat.org.

In this edition:

* Three New CubeSats Now in Orbit
* Tomsk-TPU-120 CubeSat Celebrates University Anniversary
* Audio Recordings of FO-12 and AO-15 Requested
* ZACUBE-1 Beacon Preparations to be Presented at AMSAT SA Space Symposium
* Upcoming ARISS Contact Schedule
* Possible Satellite Activation CY9C St. Paul Island August 2016
* IARU Region 2 Call for EmComm Workshop Papers, Presentations

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-122.01
ANS-122 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 122.01
From AMSAT HQ Kensington, MD.
May 1, 2016
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-122.01

Three New CubeSats Now in Orbit

Signals have been received from the three CubeSats launched April 25 on Soyuz
flight VS14 from the Kourou spaceport in South America.

The three CubeSats were developed by student teams under the European Space
Agency (ESA) Education Office “Fly Your Satellite!” program, which is aimed at
training the next generation of aerospace professionals. The satellites are
OUFTI-1, Université of Liège, Belgium; e-st@r-II, Polytechnic of Turin, Italy;
AAUSAT-4, University of Aalborg, Denmark.

The signal from the e-st@r satellite 1200 bps beacon is very weak which may
indicate an antenna deployment issue or unexpectedly low transmit power. ESA
report the e-st@r team is working to consolidate the radio communication link
with their satellite.

OUFTI-1 carries the first dedicated amateur D-Star satellite transponder,
further information and frequencies of all three CubeSats are at
D-STAR satellite to launch from Kourou

Daniel Estévez EA4GPZ used a FUNcube Dongle Pro+ and a handheld Arrow Satellite
antenna to receive a signal from AAUSAT-4, call sign OZ4CUB.

First signals from AAUSAT-4

OUFTI-1 reports http://www.dk3wn.info/p/?cat=321

e-st@r reports http://www.dk3wn.info/p/?cat=84

AAUSAT-4 reports http://www.dk3wn.info/p/?cat=8

[ANS thanks AMSAT-UK for the above information]

———————————————————————

Tomsk-TPU-120 CubeSat Celebrates University Anniversary

The Russian Tomsk-TPU-120 CubeSat is different from other CubeSats – it has a
handle!

The 3U CubeSat was launched from Baikonur to the ISS on March 31, 2016 in a
Progress-MS-2 cargo vessel. It will be deployed by hand during a future Russian
spacewalk (EVA), which is why it has a handle.

The satellite was developed by students at the Tomsk Polytechnic University to
test new space materials technology and will be the world’s first space vehicle
with a 3D-printed structure.

In May 2016 Tomsk Polytechnic University celebrates its 120th anniversary. As
part of the celebrations on May 10-11 Tomsk-TPU-120 will be activated in the ISS
and will transmit a greeting to Earth inhabitants, recorded by students of the
university in 10 languages: Russian, English, German, French, Chinese, Arabic,
Tatar, Indian, Kazakh and Portuguese.

The greeting signal will be transmitted once a minute on 437.025 MHz FM. One of
the Kenwood transceivers on the ISS will provide a simulcast of the signal on 145.800 MHz FM.

Dmitry Pashkov R4UAB reports that on May 5 the Russian ISS crew will charge the
satellite battery, connect the antenna and configure the Kenwood transceiver for
simulcast operation, they will then make a test transmission.

Dmitry operates a WebSDR which you can use to receive the transmissions when the
ISS is over Russia http://websdr.r4uab.ru/

The next Russian spacewalk appears to be EVA-43 which expected to take place in
early 2017 http://spaceflight101.com/iss/iss-calendar/

Use Google translator to read original article by Dmitry Pashkov R4UAB

Эксперимент «Радиоскаф» на борту Международной Космической Станции

World’s First 3D-printed Satellite http://tpu.ru/en/news-events/760/

[ANS thanks Gunter’s Space Page, R4UAB, and AMSAT-UK for the above
information]

——————————————————————–

Audio Recordings of FO-12 and AO-15 Requested

Mathias, DD1US, maintains a homepage at www.dd1us.de Included is a section
called “Sounds from Space”.

More than 1000 recordings of various satellite and space objects have been
collected and are available for listening.

Mathias is still searching for various recordings of Amateur Radio Satellites,
especially for Fuji-OSCAR-12 and UoSAT-OSCAR-15. If you have old tapes or
cassettes with recordings of Ham Radio Satellites he will be happy to digitize
them and add them to the archive.

[ANS thanks Mathias, DD1US, for the above information]

——————————————————————–

ZACUBE-1 Beacon Preparations to be Presented at AMSAT SA Space Symposium

Students from the Cape Peninsula University of Technology will present a paper
at the AMSAT SA Space Symposium on the high frequency beacon transmitter
developed to test a three element direction finding array constructed at SANSA
Space Science in Hermanus to receive the 14 099 kHz HF beacon signal from
ZACUBE-1 and future ZACUBE-i space weather missions. A ground-based transmitter
was developed for verification and calibration of this array. The signal will be
used to verify the operation of the hardware and software used to determine the
direction of arrival of the incoming signal. More about the symposium on 28 May
2016, details on the many papers to be presented and how to register for the
event can be found on www.amsatsa.org.za

[ANS thanks the SARL weekly news in English 2016-4-30 for the above information]

——————————————————————–

Upcoming ARISS Contact Schedule

Ashfield Primary School, Otley, West Yorkshire, UK, direct via GB1APS
The ISS callsign is presently scheduled to be GB1SS
The scheduled astronaut is Timothy Peake KG5BVI
Contact is a go for: Thu 2016-05-05 08:08:09 UTC 46 deg (***)

All Saints STEAM Academy (AS2A), Middletown, Rhode Island, direct via
N1ASA
The ISS callsign is presently scheduled to be TBD
The scheduled astronaut is Tim Kopra KE5UDN or Jeff Williams KD5TVQ
Contact is a go for: Fri 2016-05-06 16:43:47 UTC 56 deg (***)

[ANS thanks Charlie, AJ9N, for the above information]

——————————————————————–

Possible Satellite Activation CY9C St. Paul Island August 2016

CY9C, ST. PAUL ISLAND DXPEDITION (August 19-29th). Randy, N0TG, reports
the following on April 16th: As was reported previously, we will have
two separate sites…separated approximately 1.5 miles.

Site 1 will be the Atlantic Cove site with 6 operators. We will try
to keep 4-5 radios running and more if 12/10m opens. Our plan is to
have a RTTY station active at all times. From this site 160 will be
given lots of attention with the Battle Creek Special antenna.

Site 2 – the Northeast Point separate island will be enhanced to include
4 -5 operators active at all times, thus the dxpedition in total can
potentially have 8-10 radios working most of the time. We are seriously
considering 6m EME and Satellite, however, we need to work out the
planning details. And, as always, budget matters are a significant
consideration as we expand operations. We appreciate the support by
many to date. The desire is to make this a very complete operation
that will offer fun and meeting needs for all interests.

The CY9C Web page is: http://www.CY9Dxpedition.com

[ANS thanks the Ohio/Penn DX Bulletin #1263 for the above information]

——————————————————————–

IARU Region 2 Call for EmComm Workshop Papers, Presentations

International Amateur Radio Union Region 2 (IARU-R2) will hold an Emergency
Communications Workshop in Chile this fall, in conjunction with the 19th IARU
Region 2 General Assembly. The conference committee is inviting papers and
presentations the event. The workshop on October 11 in Viña del Mar, Chile, will
offer an opportunity for Region 2 emergency coordinators and other national-
level Amateur Radio emergency communication experts to network and to share
information on Amateur Radio emergency response as well as to augment the
capabilities of the region’s amateurs to react to large-scale, multinational
communication emergencies.

The event is open to radio amateurs in IARU Region 2 with high-level expertise
in providing disaster and emergency communication. Attendees will be responsible
for their travel and lodging costs. A block of rooms will be available at the
O’Higgins Hotel in downtown Viña del Mar.

Link to Register online:

http://www.arrl.org/news/iaru-region-2-calls-for-emergency-communications-
workshop-papers-presentations

Call for Papers

Delegates representing IARU Region 2 member societies, national or international
Amateur Radio emergency communication organizations, or national/international-
level subject matter experts in Amateur Radio emergency communication are
invited to submit proposals and informational papers. Topics must be related to
Amateur Radio emergency communication, disaster response, technology, or
operating standards.

Documents must be in electronic form (MS Word or Power Point). When laying out
the document format, use A4 paper with at least 3-centimeter margins on all
sides. The title page should have a top margin of at least 6 centimeters. Do not
insert page headers or footers.

The deadline to submit is July 1. The IARU Region 2 Emergency Communications
Workshop Committee will select the most appropriate papers for presentation. All
other submitted materials will be compiled for distribution to all delegates and
will be posted on the Region 2 website for downloading.

Direct submissions in English to ecw@iaru-r2.org; direct submissions in Spanish
to tce@iaru-r2.org.

The Emergency Communications Workshop will be held on Tuesday, October 11, at
the Hotel O’Higgins in Viña del Mar from 9 AM until 6 PM.

[ANS thanks the ARRL and IARU for the above information]

/EX

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the
President’s Club. Members of the President’s Club, as sustaining
donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive addi-
tional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT
Office.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership
at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students
enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the stu-
dent rate for a maximum of 6 post-secondary years in this status.
Contact Martha at the AMSAT Office for additional student membership
information.

73,
This week’s ANS Editor,
Lee McLamb, KU4OS
ku4os at amsat dot org

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE
ANS-115

The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and infor-
mation service of AMSAT North America, The Radio Amateur Satellite
Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in Space
including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur
Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building,
launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio
satellites.

The news feed on http://www.amsat.org publishes news of Amateur
Radio in Space as soon as our volunteers can post it.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to:
ans-editor at amsat.org.

In this edition:

* IARU-R1: Global APRS Harmonisation and Satellite Coordination
* United Launch Alliance Opens Competition for Free Cubesat Launches
* TAPR Dayton Hamvention Digital Forum Announces Presenters
* OUFTI-1 Telemetry Decoder App
* Commemorative ARISS Slow-Scan TV Transmissions a Success
* Be The First to Catch a Signal From Fly Your Satellite! From Space!
* ARISS News
* Satellite Shorts From All Over

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-115.01
ANS-115 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 115.01
From AMSAT HQ KENSINGTON, MD.
DATE April 24, 2016
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-115.01

IARU-R1: Global APRS Harmonisation and Satellite Coordination

The IARU Region 1 Interim Meeting was held April 15-17, 2016 in
Vienna. Minutes for the C5 VHF/UHF/Microwave committee are now
available.

Some 70 delegates from over 20 Member Societies discussed a wide
range of issues in the VHF/UHF/Microwave, HF and EMC Committees.
Recommendations from the meeting will be considered by the Region 1
Executive Committee at its meeting in early May 2016. If approved by
the EC, these recommendations will become interim Region 1 policy
until the next General Conference in 2017, at which time all
Societies present will have the opportunity to ratify the proposals.

Among the key items in the minutes are:

4.1. Report of satellite coordinator C5_04
Graham Shirville G3VZV presented the report of satellite
coordinator. G3VZV emphasized that the frequency coordination between
the three Regions has to be improved for avoiding interference
incidents like PC-Sat and some of the XW2 satellites.

Due to current reports from MS about some observations of harmful
interference, RSGB is asked to prepare a statement for publishing to
inform MS and members how to take care.

C5 chairman is asked to bring up the issue on EC meeting, because
further AC action is required.

5.2. Band Planning 5 GHz: C5_10
VIE16_C5_Rec_06: To correct the satellite segment the table in
chapter 4.9 by deleting “5790”, inserting “5830” and adding the
footnote: “Any wideband system shall protect narrowband applications”.

6.1. General matters: C5_26
VIE16_C5_Rec_11A: To discuss an even more extended [Grid Square]
locator system that is used for ATV (including IARU ATV contest) and
for other purposes by using the Wiki and prepares a document for GC
2017 if necessary. (Note this will clarify the definition of 10 digit
[character] locators used for microwaves etc see example at
http://no.nonsense.ee/qth/map.html )

7.2. APRS Harmonisation: C5_41
VIE16_C5_Rec_23: The C5 chairman to answer Regions 2 and 3 that:
• 144.390 MHz is not suitable for Region 1 and that Region-3 should
consider 144.800
• To consider an additional 144 MHz frequency (that might be
compatible) with Region 2 and 3
• To also consider 435 MHz usage and newer APRS technologies (for
the 2017 GC)

Download the C5 VHF/UHF/Microwave Vienna 2016 Minutes
http://tinyurl.com/IARU-R1-Vienna-2016-C5-Minutes

The input papers are available as a matter of record:

HF Papers http://tinyurl.com/ANS115-HFpapers

VHF/UHF/Microwave papers http://tinyurl.com/ANS115-MicrowavePapers

EMC Papers http://tinyurl.com/ANS115-EMCpapers

[ANS thanks AMSAT-UK for the above information]

———————————————————————

United Launch Alliance Opens Competition for Free Cubesat Launches

United Launch Alliance has begun accepting applications from
colleges and universities across the U.S. to compete for free cubesat
launch slots aboard upcoming Atlas 5 rockets.

The educational opportunity will use excess performance aboard
rockets launching to space to carry the tiny student-made craft made
of science and technology experiments.

“Universities pioneered cubesat development, and there is a growing
need for launch access and availability,” said Tory Bruno, ULA
president and CEO.

“Our goal is to eventually add university cubesat slots to nearly
every Atlas and Vulcan Centaur launch – with potential for 100 rides
per year.”

Cubesats are baselined at 10 cm x 10 cm x 10 cm (4 inches x 4 inches
x 4 inches) and approximately 1.3 kg (3 lbs). The craft are housed in
a box-like Aft Bulkhead Carrier on the Centaur upper stage, next to
the RL10C-1 engine, and ejected from the dispenser into orbit.

ULA has successfully launched 55 cubesats through the company’s 106
flights to date. Those opportunities were via National Reconnaissance
Office, Air Force and NASA initiatives.

Now, ULA is giving the miniature hitchhiker payloads free rides on
Atlas 5 boosters and the future Vulcan rocket now in development to
debut in 2019. The company is the first launch provider to make free
cubesat flight opportunities available on its own.

“ULA’s cubesat program revolutionizes access to space for these
payloads while ensuring that the next generation of rocket scientists
and space entrepreneurs has the opportunity to continue driving on-
orbit innovation,” Bruno said.

The competitive program is available to all U.S. accredited colleges
and universities. They are encouraged to partner with K-12 schools to
further expand science, technology, engineering and math (STEM)
education.

The deadline to apply is June 1. The winning cubesats will be
announced later this summer.

The selection committee will look at a proposal’s mission objectives
in science and STEM, outreach plans for their local community,
technical requirements and the likelihood of meeting the development
schedule. Safety to the flight’s primary payload and ensuring the
cubesat will not threaten or do any harm to the mission will be
judged, too.

Each application will face the following criteria:

* Technical Requirements — 25%
* Mission Objective — 25%
* Outreach Component — 25%
* Proposal Credibility — 15%
* Quality of Proposal — 10%

Six cubesat launch slots are available in this first round of the
program, each payload sized at “1U” in cubesat-speak, for two Atlas 5
missions. The first launch will likely be a geosychronous transfer
orbit mission targeted for mid-2017. The second flight, also to GTO,
is planned for mid-2018.

To apply, visit: http://www.ulalaunch.com/cubesats.aspx

[ANS thanks SpaceFlightNow.com for the above information]

———————————————————————

TAPR Dayton Hamvention Digital Forum Announces Presenters

TAPR has announced the presentations for its Dayton Hamvention®
Digital Forum, moderated by Scotty Cowling, WA2DFI, on Friday, May
20, at 9:15 AM.

Among the presentions will be “SatNOGS — A network of open source
satellite ground stations,” by Corey Shields, KB9JHU. CubeSat
operators tend to have few ground stations of their own and rely on
radio amateurs to help collect telemetry. The SatNOGS Project is a
Network of Open Source Satellite Ground Stations, focusing on Low
Earth Orbit (LEO) satellites. Shields will introduce SatNOGS as a way
to increase the amount of data collected and reported from these
CubeSats.

Bryan Fields, W9CR, will present “HamWAN High-Speed IP Radio
Network,” an Amateur Radio high-speed IP backbone concept that uses
the same techniques enabling the Internet.

The topic of a presentation by Chris Testa, KD2BMH, will be “SDR
Disrupt.” It will review the landscape and advancements in SDR
technologies over the past year, as numerous technologies are driving
the power-price-performance curve to a new level of efficiency.
Latest developments in digital voice will also be discussed.

“Spectrum Monitoring with Software Defined Radio,” by Mike Ossmann,
AD0NR, will follow.

More information about TAPR activities at Dayton is on the TAPR
website.
http://www.tapr.org/dayton.html

[ANS thanks TAPR and the ARRL for the above information]

———————————————————————

OUFTI-1 Telemetry Decoder App

The OUFTI-1 D-STAR CubeSat team have released the format of the CW
telemetry beacon and a Decoder App. The launch, on a Russian Soyuz-
STA Fregat-M from Kourou in South America, is expected to take place
at 21:02:13 UT on Friday, April 22, 2016.

OUFTI-1 is a nano-satellite entirely developed by the students of
the University of Liege (ULg), Belgium, along with two other
engineering schools. It is the first satellite to carry a dedicated
amateur radio D-STAR transponder.

OUFTI-1 amateur radio information including Keps

Radioamateurs

The PDF of the article ‘D-STAR digital amateur communications in
space with OUFTI-1 CubeSat’ by Jonathan Pisane ON7JPD, Amandine Denis
ON4EYA and Jacques Verly ON9CWD can be downloaded from
http://tinyurl.com/ANS115-OUTFIT-1

IARU coordinated frequencies for all CubeSats on the Russian Soyuz
launch http://www.amsat.org.uk/iaru/

OUFTI-1 – 145.950 MHz FSK AX25 and D-STAR (uplink 435.045 MHz) – CW
beacon 145.980 MHz
e-st@r-II – 437.485 MHz CW and 1k2 AFSK
AAUSAT-4 – 437.425 MHz

[ANS thanks AMSAT-UK for the above information]

———————————————————————

Commemorative ARISS Slow-Scan TV Transmissions a Success

The recent commemorative Amateur Radio on the International Space
Station (ARISS) slow-scan television (SSTV) transmissions from April
11 to April 14 were successful, with images received by many stations
around the world. The SSTV transmissions marked the 15th anniversary
(in 2015) of continuous Amateur Radio operations on the International
Space Station.

The first ISS crew conducted its inaugural ham radio contact from
NA1SS in November 2000, and the first ARISS school/group contact took
place the following month. Since then more than 1000 ARISS
school/group contacts have been completed.

Images received from the ISS have been posted on the gallery
website. Anyone who received SSTV images from the ISS also may post
them there. The SSTV transmissions were in PD180 format. Additional
“MAI-75 Experiment” SSTV transmissions took place on April 14 and
April 15, and these have been posted as well. The commemorative SSTV
images showed a few of the radio amateurs who have served aboard the
ISS.

The gallery of images can be viewed at
http://ariss-sstv.blogspot.com/

[ANS thanks ARISS and the ARRL for the above information]

———————————————————————

Be The First to Catch a Signal From Fly Your Satellite! From Space!

It is time to start listening to space. To celebrate the upcoming
launch of the three Fly Your Satellite! student-built CubeSats into
low Earth orbit, ESA’s Education office challenges the amateur radio
community to listen out for the tiny satellites.

The first three radio amateurs to send a recorded signal from either
AAUSAT4, E-st@r-II or OUFTI-1 will receive a prize from ESA’s
Education Office.

The satellites will be launched on 22 April onboard the Soyuz VS-14
flight from the European Spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana. Together
with CNES’ Microscope scientific satellite, they will be auxiliary
payloads in the launch of ESA’s Earth observation satellite Sentinel-
1B, the main passenger on this flight.

Soon after being deployed into their final orbit, the CubeSats will
begin transmitting signals to Earth that can be picked up by anyone
with common amateur radio equipment. ESA challenges anyone to record
the signal and send it to cubesats@esa.int, and to the CubeSat team.

For each CubeSat, the first email received for which the signal is
confirmed to belong to the CubeSat will be awarded with the following
prizes:

ESA Fly Your Satellite! poster
ESA Education goodie bag
Scale 1:1 3D printed model of a CubeSat
Radio Contact Information:
Please consult the following links to obtain specific information
for radio contact for each of the three CubeSats.

AAUSAT4 Downlink frequency 437.425 MHz
For more HAM radio information see
http://tinyurl.com/ANS115-AAUSAT4
Contact: aausat4 (at) space.aau.dk

E-st@r-II Downlink frequency 437.485 MHz
For more HAM radio information see

Radio amateurs


Contact: cubesat.team (at) polito.it

OUFTI-1 Downlink frequency 145.980 MHz
For more HAM radio information see

Radioamateurs


Contact: oufti-1 (at) ulg.ac.be

What your email should contain:
Sound recording of the CW beacon
Your Name
Callsign
Snailmail address for QSL
Reception time of CW beacon
CW beacon decoded
Location
A few lines about your equipment

More information about Fly Your Satellite! can be found at
http://www.esa.int/Education/CubeSats_-_Fly_Your_Satellite

[ANS thanks ESA for the above information]

———————————————————————

ARISS News

+ A Successful contact was made between STEM Trajectory Initiative
with Albuquerque Public Schools, Albuquerque, New Mexico and
Astronaut Jeff Williams KD5TVQ using Callsign NA1SS. The contact
began 2016-04-22 17:32:37 UTC and lasted about nine and a half
minutes. Contact was direct via NM5HD.
ARISS Mentor was Tim W6MU.

+ A Successful contact was made between TBD Saratov, Russia
and Cosmonaut Yuri Malenchenko RK3DUP using Callsign RS0ISS. The
contact began 2016-04-23 09:06 UTC and lasted about nine and a half
minutes. Contact was direct.
Mentor was Sergey RV3DR.

+ A Successful contact was made between Wellesley House School,
Broadstairs, Kent, UK and Astronaut Timothy Peake KG5BVI using
Callsign GB1SS. The contact began 2016-04-23 12:10:50 UTC and lasted
about nine and a half minutes. Contact was direct via GB1WHS.
ARISS Mentor was Ciaran MØXTD. HamTV coverage???

Upcoming ARISS Contact Schedule

Republic of Chuvashia, direct via TBD (***)
The ISS callsign is presently scheduled to be RSØISS (***)
The scheduled astronaut is Yuri Malenchenko RK3DUP (***)
Contact is a go for Sun 2016-04-24 09:50 UTC

The Derby High School, Bury, UK, direct via GB1DHS
The ISS callsign is presently scheduled to be GB1SS
The scheduled astronaut is Timothy Peake KG5BVI
Contact is a go for: Mon 2016-04-25 12:02:27 UTC

Istituto Comprensivo Statale “Diego Valeri”, Campolongo Maggiore,
Italy, direct via IZ3YRA
The ISS callsign is presently scheduled to be OR4ISS
The scheduled astronaut is Tim Kopra KE5UDN
Contact is a go for: Fri 2016-04-29 08:34:08 UTC 64 deg

[ANS thanks ARISS, Charlie AJ9N and David AA4KN for the above
information]

[ANS thanks ARISS, Charlie AJ9N information]

———————————————————————

Satellite Shorts From All Over

+ The article, “Amateur Radio in the STEM Classroom One Tecinical
Tool-Countless Lesson Applications” appears in the latest Tech
Directions magazine.
The article can be read at
http://tinyurl.com/ANS115-techdirections

The free magazine is at:
https://www.techdirections.com/

[ANS thanks ARRL’s Illinois Section newsletter for the above
information]

+ Lomonosov, AIST-2D and SamSat-218 Launch

First launch from Vostochny – carries a three-satellite payload. The
purpose of the mission is to test the infrastructure associated with
the new launch site.

There is a pair of satellites for sun-synchronous orbit:

Lomonosov – Science satellite for studies of ultra-high energy
cosmic rays, X-rays and gamma rays in the upper layers of the Earth’s
atmosphere and in near-Earth space.

Lomonosov mission website: http://lomonosov.sinp.msu.ru/en/

AIST-2D – Joint project between Samara State Aerospace University
and SRC Progress to develop a small light-weight surveillance
spacecraft principally for use by the Russian government.

The launch will also carry SamSat-218 – 3U Cubesat created by
students and scientists from Samara State Aerospace University in
Russia as a technology demonstrator and educational satellite. Its
main task is to test algorithms for controlling the orientation of
nano-satellites.

The Volga stage of the launch vehicle will be caused to re-enter
over the south Pacific Ocean about six hours after lift-off.

Possible webcast (very much “to be confirmed”):
http://www.russian.space/306/

[ANS thanks www.zarya.info for the above information]

+ New Distance Record for AO-85

A new distance record of 5751 kilometers (3565.6 miles) has been
claimed for an AO-85 (Fox-1A) satellite contact.

Betrand Demarcq, FG8OJ, in Saint-Francois, Guadeloupe (FK96ig),
worked Jose Elias Diaz Rodriguez, EB1FVQ, in Vigo, Spain (IN52pe),
at 19:15 UTC on April 14, 2016.

A recording of the contact is available.

AMSAT posts records on its AMSAT Satellite Distance Records page.
Send new claims to Paul Stoetzer, N8HM. The AO-85 CubeSat was
launched last October. It carries a U/V FM transponder. —

[ANS thanks Thanks Paul, N8HM and the ARRL for the above
information]

+ Satellite Distance Records can be viewed at

Satellite Distance Records

[ANS thanks AMSAT for the above information]

———————————————————————

/EX

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the
President’s Club. Members of the President’s Club, as sustaining
donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive addi-
tional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT
Office.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership
at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students
enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the stu-
dent rate for a maximum of 6 post-secondary years in this status.
Contact Martha at the AMSAT Office for additional student membership
information.

73,
This week’s ANS Editor,
EMike McCardel, AA8EM (former KC8YLD)
kc8yld at amsat dot org

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE
ANS-108
The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and infor-
mation service of AMSAT North America, The Radio Amateur Satellite
Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in Space
including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur
Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building,
launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio
satellites.

The news feed on http://www.amsat.org publishes news of Amateur
Radio in Space as soon as our volunteers can post it.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to:
ans-editor at amsat.org.

In this edition:

* New AO-85 Distance Record Claimed
* First-Ever D-STAR Satellite to Launch
* TAPR Digital Forum Schedule at Dayton Hamvention, Friday, 5/20
* Hans Blondeel Timmerman, PB2T, Named as IARU Satellite Adviser
* Contest – Catch the signal of e-st@r-II CubeSat
* Satellite DX Operation
* ARRL/TAPR Digital Communications Conference
* ULA University CubeSat Competition
* AMSAT Events
* ARISS News
* Satellite Shorts From All Over

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-108.01
ANS-108 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 108.01
>From AMSAT HQ KENSINGTON, MD.
DATE April 17, 2016
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-108.01

———————————————————————

New AO-85 Distance Record Claimed

5,751 km is the new claimed distance record for a QSO on AO-85.
Betrand Demarcq, FG8OJ, in Saint-Francois, Guadeloupe (FK96ig) worked
Jose Elias Diaz Rodriguez, EB1FVQ, in Vigo, Spain (IN52pe) at 19:15
UTC on April 14, 2016. A recording of the QSO is available here:

The AMSAT Satellite Distance Records page is located at

Satellite Distance Records


New record claims may be sent to
n8hm@amsat.org.

[ANS thanks AMSAT-NA and Paul, N8HM for the above information]

———————————————————————

First-Ever D-STAR Satellite to Launch

The first-ever satellite to carry a D-STAR (Digital Smart Technologies for
Amateur Radio) Amateur Radio payload into space is expected to launch on
April 22 from Guiana. The OUFTI-1 (Orbital Utility For Telecommunication
Innovations) CubeSat is one of three CubeSats developed by student teams under
the European Space Agency (ESA) Education Office “Fly Your Satellite!”
program, which is aimed at training the next generation of aerospace
professionals. The satellites arrived in South America on March 25, followed
by the student teams a few days later.

On March 30 the students pulled the “Remove Before Flight” pins and
successfully verified that their CubeSats were ready for launch before
replacing the access ports on the P-POD, which will secure the CubeSats prior
to and during launch and then will release them into orbit. The next time the
students will have contact with their respective CubeSats will be through
their spacecraft’s communication link, after the CubeSats have been deployed
into orbit. Once thermal-optical tape has been applied to the P-POD to shield
the CubeSats from extreme thermal radiation during the launch phase, the P-POD
will be integrated with the Soyuz launch vehicle.

Constructed by students at the University of Liege in Belgium (ULg), OUFTI-1
will be the first satellite to carry an Amateur Radio D-STAR transponder.
Developed by the Japan Amateur Radio League, D-STAR enables the simultaneous
transmission of voice and digital data as well as call sign-based roaming via
the Internet.

“The OUFTI-1 D-STAR repeater will be available either as a direct
communication repeater between two users, and as an extension of the ULg
D-STAR repeater,” explains the article “D-STAR digital amateur communications
in space with OUFTI-1 CubeSat” by Jonathan Pisane, ON7JPD; Amandine Denis,
ON4EYA, and Jacques Verly, ON9CWD, all of ULg. The CubeSat’s frequencies are
145.950 MHz (FSK AX.25), and D-STAR down, with an uplink at 435.045 MHz.
OUFTI-1 will carry a CW beacon transmitting on 145.980 MHz.

The other two CubeSats are from Italy and Denmark. The CubeSat e-st@r-II from
the Polytechnic University of Turin, Italy, will demonstrate an attitude
control system using measurements of Earth’s magnetic field. It will transmit
CW and 1.2 k AFSK on 437.485 MHz. AAUSAT4 from the University of Aalborg,
Denmark, will operate an automated ocean vessel identification system. It will
transmit on 437.425 MHz.

See
https://ukamsat.files.wordpress.com/2016/04/202_jun_2013.pdf

[ANS thanks the ARRL Letter for the above information]

———————————————————————

TAPR Digital Forum Schedule at Dayton Hamvention, Friday, 5/20

TAPR Digital Forum Schedule
Moderator: Scotty Cowling, WA2DFI

9:15 to 9:25 am Introduction by Steve Bible, N7HPR, TAPR President

9:25 to 9:35 am “Write for QST/QEX” by Kai Siwiak KE4PT, QEX Editor

9:35 to 10:00 am “SatNOGS – A network of open source satellite ground
stations”. by Corey Shields KB9JHU
Abstract: CubeSat operators tend to have few ground stations of their own and
rely on amateur operators to help collect telemetry. With CubeSat deployments
on the rise, more and more data is lost as there are not enough ground stations
listening. The SatNOGS Project is a Network of Open Source Satellite Ground
Stations, focusing on Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellites. In this presentation,
we introduce SatNOGS as a way to increase the amount of data collected from
these satellites and returned to their operators. Learn what the SatNOGS
project is, how it works, and what we have planned for the future of amateur
radio satellite reception.

10:00 to 10:25 am “HamWAN High Speed IP Radio Network” by Bryan Fields, W9CR
Abstract: Presented will be an amateur radio high-speed IP backbone concept
(HamWAN) with an emphases on building regional highly available networks.
Utilizing the same techniques which enable the Internet, Amateur Radio networks
may be built connecting projects to the Internet or other sites. Included will
be an update on the regional HamWAN network deployments.

10:25 to 10:50 am “SDR Disrupt” by Chris Testa, KD2BMH
Abstract: Tools and techniques for software defined radio continue to evolve
at a rapid pace, and we’ll go over the landscape and advancements in SDR
technologies this past year. Numerous technologies are driving the power-price-
performance curve to a new level of efficiency. We’ll take a look at John
Stephensen, KD6OZH’s mesh project (part of TAPR), which helps pave the way for
next-generation wireless links. Latest developments in digital voice will also
be discussed.

10:50 to 11:15 am “Spectrum Monitoring with Software Defined Radio” by Mike
Ossmann, AD0NR
Abstract: Having developed HackRF One, the world’s lowest cost wideband
Software Defined Radio transceiver, the HackRF project continues to produce
open source hardware designs for SDR. Find out about our designs in development
now and our ideas for future boards that will enable the next generation of SDR
enthusiasts.

More information about TAPR activities at the Dayton Hamvention at:
http://www.tapr.org/dayton.html

[ANS thanks TAPR for the above information]

———————————————————————

Hans Blondeel Timmerman, PB2T, Named as IARU Satellite Advisor

The International Amateur Radio Union is pleased to announce that Hans
Blondeel Timmerman, PB2T, is appointed to serve as IARU Satellite Advisor.

The appointment is effective immediately. Blondeel Timmerman was first
licensed in 1980 and has served as VERON HF Manager from 2000-2001 and as
VERON Vice President from 2001-2008. He was a member of the IARU Region 1
Executive Committee from 2002-2008 and served as IARU Region 1 President from
2008-2014. Blondeel Timmerman has served as EUDXF President since 2004 and
currently serves as a YASME Foundation Director. He is retired from the
Netherlands Army Signal Corps after a 38 year career working on satellite
projects and spectrum management. He lives in the Netherlands with his wife
Margareet, K2XYL and has 2 adult sons.

The IARU Satellite Advisor represents the IARU to the satellite community and
the various amateur satellite organizations and performs satellite frequency
coordination according to the guidelines established by the IARU. In
addition, the position calls for maintaining a database of coordination
requests and letters, report to the IARU Administrative Council on issues
related to satellites and satellite frequency coordination and, if requested,
to provide technical and operation advice to assist the representation of the
amateur satellite service to the International Telecommunication Union. The
Satellite Advisor is assisted by a panel of volunteer satellite advisory
members.

Blondeel Timmerman replaces Hans van de Groenendaal, ZS6AKV, who has served as
IARU Satellite Adviser since 1994. Van de Groenendaal has established many
of the procedures used for amateur satellite frequency coordination and has
been a critical contributor to the process of satellite frequency coordination
for IARU. The IARU is grateful for Hans van de Groenendaal’s excellent work
and thanks him for his years of service in this important position. He will
remain as special adviser to the satellite committee.

Any additional information can be obtained from the International Amateur
Radio Union, PO Box 310905, Newington, CT 06131-0905 USA
Phone +1 860 594 0200
Fax +1 860 594 0259.

IARU Satellite Page
http://www.iaru.org/satellite.html

http://www.arrl.org/news/hans-blondeel-timmerman-pb2t-named-as-iaru-satellite-
advisor

[ANS thanks the IARU and the ARRL for the above information]

———————————————————————

Contest – Catch the signal of e-st@r-II CubeSat

We are the CubeSat Team of Politecnico di Torino, and we are writing to inform
you about the contest we have announced today.

The CubeSat Team is a student team of Politecnico di Torino involved in the
design and development of small platforms for scientific missions and for
testing new technologies. We are guys enthralled by space activities.
Undergraduate and graduate students work together with researchers and
professors to create a real hands-on experience.

“SPACE IN A CUBE: MISSIONS OF THE FUTURE” is our motto! We believe that small
satellites can contribute to a broad set of science goals and space based
services. Our CubeSat missions aim at conceiving new scenarios and
technologies to serve the scientific community while educating students in the
challenging field of aerospace engineering.

Our first CubeSat, e-st@r-I, was launched into orbit on February 2012, and the
second satellite, e-st@r-II, will be launched next week: the Soyuz launch ST-A
VS14 is scheduled on April 22, 2016, at exactly 09:02:13 p.m UTC, from the
European spaceport in French Guiana

http://www.arianespace.com/mission/ariane-flight-vs14/

It is just one week to launch… it’s time for us to prepare for operations.
To celebrate this date, we invite the radio-ham community to support the
e-st@r-II mission by participating in the contest to listen for our CubeSat
from orbit!
We have prizes for the first to receive the e-st@r-II signal and for the one
who provides us with the higher number of packets received in the first month
in orbit!

All details of the competition can be found at our official webpage:

Radio amateurs

Follow the daily updates on our Facebook page
https://www.facebook.com/CubeSatTeam .

Thank you in advance for your help in collecting TLM packets….. and break a leg!

CubeSat Team
Website: http://areeweb.polito.it/cubesat-team/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CubeSatTeam
Twitter: https://twitter.com/CubeSatTeam

[ANS thanks JoAnne, K9JKM and the CubeSat Team of Politecnico di Torino for
the above information]

———————————————————————

Satellite DX Operation

Bahamas (FL15) – Bryan Green, KL7CN, plans to be active during daytime
passes of FO-29 and SO-50 from Nassau, Bahamas as C6ACN on Tuesday,
April 19, 2016 and from Coco Cay, Bahamas midday on Wednesday, April
20, 2016 (times TBD). The plan is subject to change. See @kl7cn on
Twitter for updates.

Posted on the AMSAT Upcoming Satellite Operations page

Upcoming Satellite Operations

[ANS thanks Paul, N8HM for the above information]

———————————————————————

ARRL/TAPR Digital Communications Conference

Technical papers are solicited for presentation at the 35th Annual ARRL/TAPR
Digital Communications Conference, to be held September 16-18 in
St. Petersburg, Florida. Papers will also be published in the Conference
Proceedings. Authors do not need to attend the conference to have their papers
included in the Proceedings. The submission deadline is July 31, 2016.

The ARRL/TAPR Digital Communications Conference is an international forum for
technically minded radio amateurs to meet and present new ideas and
techniques. Paper/presentation topic areas include — but are not limited to —

software defined radio (SDR),
digital voice,
digital satellite communication,
digital signal processing (DSP),
HF digital modes,
adapting IEEE 802.11 systems for Amateur Radio,
Global Positioning System (GPS),
Automatic Position Reporting System (APRS),
Linux in Amateur Radio,
AX.25 updates and Internet interoperability with Amateur Radio networks.

Submit papers to via e-mail to
maty@arrl.org
or via postal mail to:
Maty Weinberg, KB1EIB, ARRL,
225 Main St,
Newington, CT 06111.

Papers will be published exactly as submitted, and authors will retain all
rights. Please do not email zip files as these will be rejected by our servers.

[ANS thanks Steve Ford, WB8IMY ARRL QST Editor for the above information]

———————————————————————

ULA University CubeSat Competition

To U.S. colleges and universities:
United Launch Alliance has posted the application for its University CubeSat
Competition and entries are due June 1, 2016!

The application and more information is located at
http://www.ulalaunch.com/cubesats.aspx.

[ANS thanks ULA and CubeSat.org mailing list for theabove information]

———————————————————————

AMSAT Events

Information about AMSAT activities at other important events around
the country. Examples of these events are radio club meetings where
AMSAT Area Coordinators give presentations, demonstrations of working
amateur satellites, and hamfests with an AMSAT presence (a table with
AMSAT literature and merchandise, sometimes also with presentations,
forums, and/or demonstrations).

*Monday, 25 April 2016, AMSAT President Barry Baines, WD4ASW will give “An
Overview of AMSAT” presentation to the Greensboro (NC) Amateur Radio
Assocaition. The meeting will be held at Captain Bill’s Seafood restaurant
located at 6108 W Market St, Greensboro, NC. Attendees meet for dinner around
1815 with the club meeting starting at 1915. The club’s website is w4gso.org.

*Friday through Sunday, 29 April-1 May 2016, ARRL Nevada State Convention
in Las Vegas NV

*Saturday, 7 May 2016 – Cochise Amateur Radio Association Hamfest in Sierra
Vista AZ

*Saturday, 14 May 2016 – Matanuska Amateur Radio Association Hamfest in
Wasilla AK

*Saturday, 4 June 2016 – White Mountain Hamfest in Show Low AZ

*Saturday, 13 August 2016 – KL7KC Hamfest in Fairbanks AK

[ANS thanks AMSAT-NA for the above information]

———————————————————————

ARISS News

Sucessful Contacts

Colegio Santa Rosa, Yerba Buena, Argentina, direct via LU1KCQ
The ISS callsign was scheduled to be NA1SS
The scheduled astronaut was Jeff Williams KD5TVQ
Contact was successful!

Congrats to Argentina on this ARISS event and contact with Jeff Williams!
All 16 questions answered by Jeff Williams
170 students present with Teachers and others.
3 TV and 3 Radio Stations on site !

Gagarin from Space. This session was amateur radio communications, Orla,
Russia, direct via RK3EWW
The ISS callsign was scheduled to be RSØISS
The scheduled astronaut was Yuri Malenchenko RK3DUP
Contact was successful for 2016-04-16 15:14 UTC

From Claudio, IK1SLD in Italy:
Today the contact with RK3EWW Gagarin from Space was succesful.
Communications opened at 15:14:45 UTC and from my home I was able to copy near
3 minutes.
This is the link to the file (of course I copied only the cosmonaut answer):

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0Byp8JadKjPOmekRIQlpzdWJfZ0U/view?usp=sharing

USA Science and Engineering Festival, Washington, D.C., telebridge via IK1SLD
The ISS callsign was scheduled to be OR4ISS
The scheduled astronaut was Timothy Peake KG5BVI
Contact was successful: Sat 2016-04-16 18:19:28 UTC 78 deg

Upcoming Contacts

St Richards Catholic College, Bexhill on Sea, UK, direct via GB4SRC
The ISS callsign is presently scheduled to be GB1SS
The scheduled astronaut is Timothy Peake KG5BVI
Contact is a go for: Mon 2016-04-18 14:56:06 UTC 85 deg

An International Space Station school contact has been planned with
participants at St Richards Catholic College, Bexhill on Sea, UK on 18 Apr.
The event is scheduled to begin at approximately 14:56 UTC. The duration of
the contact is approximately 9 minutes and 30 seconds. The contact will be
direct between GB1SS and GB4SRC. The contact should be audible over the UK and
adjacent areas. Interested parties are invited to listen in on the 145.80 MHz
downlink. The contact is expected to be conducted in English.

St Richard’s Catholic College is a Science Specialist school tucked between
the South Downs and the English Channel. We have 1000 pupils on roll between
Years 7-11. We provide an inclusive education for Catholic and Christian
pupils covering an extended catchment area covering approximately a 30 mile
radius. St Richard’s was awarded Teaching School status late in 2014 and we
are the lead school in the Thrive Alliance, an association of primary schools,
secondary schools and a sixth form college as well as lead in the Sussex
Science Subject Hub. We are also a strategic partner in the Sussex Maths Hub.
St Richards’ Science department enjoys a very strong relationship with the
University of Sussex (particularly Astronomy & Physics); University of
Greenwich (Outreach)and we sit on the STEM Focus Group hosted by the
University of Brighton’s STEMSussex.

We are a keen supporter of STEM events in our region, with particular success
at the Annual STEMFest event where we have won prizes at the National Science
and Engineering Competition for the last four years, twice through to national
competition. STEMSussex have used St Richard’s STEM Clubs’ provision as an
exemplar due to its success in engaging pupils of all abilities across all
year groups. The department has also enjoyed high quality Continuous
Professional Development engagement in the STEM agenda with involvement in
‘Space as a context for teaching science’ courses and a future STEM project
with the University of Reykjavik in Iceland.

We enjoy Space Camp UK, a residential trip with all things “spacy” at the
National Space Centre and Duxford. The coordinating teacher, Dr Joolz Durkin,
is the curriculum enhancement for science and is also an enthusiastic “Space
Ambasador” and has worked with the Tim Peake Primary Project at Parklands
Infants Eastbourne, Dallington School in Dallington, Pebsham Primary in
Bexhill on Sea and Vinehall School in Heathfield as part of this link up.

Participants will ask as many of the following questions as time allows:

1. You have mentioned in an earlier call that you have been sleeping very
well on the Space Station. Is that still the case or have you found any
cumulative effects after four months in space ?

2. As the ISS hosts astronauts from many different nationalities, what
public holidays do the crew observe, if any, and how are they chosen?

3. St Richards and two of our Primary Project Partner school, Dallington and
Vinehall are taking part in the RHS ‘Rocket Science’ Experiment from the
Principia Mission. How will the results from this experiment
influence future planning for growing similar samples in another planet’s
gravity?

4. We have seen the preparation with Heston Blumental of an exciting
astronaut menu for the mission – does the food taste the same in space as
it did on Earth?

5. In a sealed spacecraft like the International Space Station, how is the
air quality monitored and controlled?

6. We see the wonderful time lapse images of the ISS orbiting the Earth, but
what I like looking at are the stars and making out the constellations.
Do you do any astronomical research on the ISS?

7. During the mission you yourself are part of experiments using the British
designed MMS Cerebral and Cochlear Fluid Pressure Analyser to collect
data for the NASA Fluid Shifts investigation. Which aspect of the
self-experimentation has been the most interesting or challenging?

8. Are there any experiments that rely on naked flames on the ISS? If so,
how are they carried out and what low gravity precautions are employed?

9. If I oversleep my parents will wake me up – have you overslept on the ISS
and had to be woken up by someone?”

10. The distance between Bexhill and Brighton is 31 miles with a journey
time by car of nearly 50 minutes. How much time would it take for the
ISS to do this trip?

11. What are the greatest challenges of living in space and in retaining a
permanent crew on board the ISS?

12. You have tweeted some amazing and beautiful images of the aurora. Have
you been able to monitor solar flare or CME activity and correlate to
the brightness of the aurora?

13. How does it feel to be able to see all humanity?

14. Is the ISS affected by the Earth’s magnetic field?

15. On Sunday you will be joining thousands of others in taking part in the
London Marathon. What special routines have you trained for this in
space?

16. In the London marathon, runners will have natural cooling as the run –
how do you regulate your body temperature in a sealed environment such
as the ISS?.

17. We understand you are taking part in the Skin B research on the ISS?
Can you share any interesting findings?

18. You have tweeted that having a bacon sandwich and cup of tea on arrival
at the ISS was the best welcome possible. What food are you looking
forward to on landing?

19. What is special about space suits that help you breathe in space when on
an EVA?

20. How smooth was the launch in December?

STEM Trajectory Initiative with Albuquerque Public Schools, Albuquerque
New Mexico, direct via NM5HD
The ISS callsign is presently scheduled to be NA1SS
The scheduled astronaut is Jeff Williams KD5TVQ
Contact is a go for: Fri 2016-04-22 17:32:37 UTC 83 deg

Wellesley House School, Broadstairs, Kent, UK, direct via GB1WHS
The ISS callsign is presently scheduled to be GB1SS
The scheduled astronaut is Timothy Peake KG5BVI
Contact is a go for: Sat 2016-04-23 12:10:50 UTC 62 deg

Watch
http://www.ariss.org/upcoming-contacts.html
for information about upcoming contacts as they are scheduled.

[ANS thanks ARISS, Dave, AA4KN, and Charlie, AJ9N for the above information]

———————————————————————

Satellite Shorts From All Over

FemtoSat Under Development

Now we’re getting even smaller than a 1U … try 3cm x 3cm x 3cm. Meet
femtosat …

http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/The_next_big_thing_in_space_is_really_really
_small_999.html

[ANS thanks JoAnne, K9JKM for the above information]

Satellite Show in Moreno Valley, CA 05/05/16

Clint Bradford, K6LCS, will be presenting his “How to Work the FM
Amateur Satellites With Your HT” session at the Moreno Valley
Amateur Radio Association on Thursday, May 5, 2016. ALL are
welcome to attend.

“The MVARC has been a LONG-time supporter of the ARRL, quite
active in their communities, and I am honored that they are asking
me back for another presentation,” Clint writes.

Attendees will be shown everything needed to work the FM voice ham
satellites – with a re-occurring theme of, “Most hams already have
most of the necessary equipment … ” Attendees can download a
four-page tutorial beforehand at …

http://www.work-sat.com

… and Clint welcomes pre-presentation questions. Call him at
909-999-SATS (909-999-7287), or send email to clint@clintbradford.com .

May 5, 2016
Lake Perris State Recreation Area
17801 Lake Perris Drive
Perris, CA 9257
Meeting Room at Parking Lot Number 9
Call-in frequency 146.500 simplex once you are in the park.
(Just tell the Ranger at the gate you are going to the MVARA
ham radio meeting – you won’t need to pay admission at the gate.)

[ANS thanks Clint, K6LCS for the above information]

———————————————————————

/EX

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the
President’s Club. Members of the President’s Club, as sustaining
donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive addi-
tional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT
Office.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership
at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students
enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the stu-
dent rate for a maximum of 6 post-secondary years in this status.
Contact Martha at the AMSAT Office for additional student membership
information.

73,
This week’s ANS Editor,
Joe Spier, K6WAO
k6wao at amsat dot org

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE
ANS-101

The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and infor-
mation service of AMSAT North America, The Radio Amateur Satellite
Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in Space
including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur
Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building,
launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio
satellites.

The news feed on http://www.amsat.org publishes news of Amateur
Radio in Space as soon as our volunteers can post it.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to:
ans-editor at amsat.org.

In this edition:

* ARISS commemorative event (April 11-14)
* AMSAT KEPs Redistribution Approved for 2016-2017
* IN81 and IN82 Grid Activation via FM Sats 22 and 24 April
* Upcoming Satellite DX
* ARISS Contacts and Events
* Geostationary / Geosynchronous Amateur Satellite Transponders
* AIAA/USU Conference on Small Satellites

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-101.01
ANS-101 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 080.01
From AMSAT HQ Kensington, MD.
April 10, 2016
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-101.01

ARISS commemorative event (April 11-14)

Looks like all the pieces are starting to fall into place for the long
awaited SSTV event. The schedule is shaping up to look like this:

* Setup and activation on April 11 about 18:25 UTC.
* Paused April 12 from 12:15 until 14:15 UTC to allow for a school
contact with Romania.
* Paused April 13 from 12:45 until 14:30 UTC to allow for a school
contact with Argentina.
* Deactivation on April 14 at 11:35 UTC.

This opportunity should cover most of the world during the operational
period.The image transmissions should be on 145.800 MHz and the mode
is planned to be PD180.

In addition, MAI-75 will be conducting two sessions afterwards. The
first one is April 14 from 14:45 until 18:00 UTC. The second session
is on April 15 from 14:10 until 19:00 UTC. These times do not cross N.
America but will provide opportunities for Europe, Southeast Asia,
Australia and S. America.

As always, all operations aboard the ISS are subject to change and
everyone interested in this activity should be vigilant and patient.”

John KG4AKV has an “ISS SSTV Reception Hints” webpage which may help:
ISS SSTV Reception Hints

[ANS thanks ARISS for the above information]

———————————————————————

AMSAT KEPs Redistribution Approved for 2016-2017

AMSAT’s request to re-distribute US Air Force Space Command Keplerian elements
from SpaceTrack has been approved for the period April 1, 2016 to April 1, 2017.
Our USSTRATCOM ODR (Orbital Data Request) to distribute the KEPs was approved on
March 17, 2016.

Thanks to AFSPC, Perry Klein, W3PK and Joe Fitzgerald, KM1P for their help
in this process.

We are “good to go” for another year.

[ANSS thanks Ray, WA5QGD, for the above information]

———————————————————————

IN81 and IN82 Grid Activation via FM Sats 22 and 24 April

Felix, EA4GQS reports that he plans to activate grids IN81 and IN82 as
EA4GQS/P via the FM satellites. He will be be traveling to these grids
during April 22-24. He said he will post his available passes on the
Satellite and Space Communications forum at QRZ.com. He will confirm via
LoTW.

[ANS thanks Felix, EA4GQS for the above information]

———————————————————————

Upcoming Satellite DX

4A. MEXICO (Bird Op, Special Event). Operators Ismael/XE1AY and David/XE3DX
will be active using the special event callsign 4A1DX between now and June
14th. Activity is to celebrate 11th anniversary of the Grupo DXXE, Mexico’s
top contest and DX radio club. Operations will be on the satellite, FM only
(**SO-50, AO-85 y Lilacsat-2). The QSL Manager is Dick, N7RO, direct or by
the Bureau (Make sure your Bureau QSL card is clearly marked via N7RO).
Don’t send your QSL cards to the Mexican Bureau; they will not be answered
because they have no QSLs. They will be uploading the log to LoTW and
ClubLog at the end of their operation (June 2016). QSOs with this station
are also good for the DXXE Award. ADDED NOTE: The special event callsign
4A1DX is also active on all HF bands using CW, SSB, RTTY, PSK31, JT65 and
EME. QSL Manager is also N7RO. See QRZ.com under 4A1DX for more details

VP5, TURKS AND CAICOS ISLANDS. John, NW4JG, informs OPDX that he is a
resident of the Turks and Caicos Island of Providenciales (NA-002) and
has just received the callsign VP5VJG (about a week ago). He mentions,
“It is very difficult to get a VP5 callsign. About 5 years working with
a tourist temporary permit on island.” His also states [edited], “I
operate with an Icom 7200 with PW-1 amp. Antennas are Force 12 (40-10m),
M2 (6 meters), and a Alpha Delta dipole (160-10 meters). We live on a
hill and the antennas are about 150′ above the Southern Atlantic Ocean.
I also work all Digital modes. Have finally received on the island all
the gear for satellite and EME with Yaesu FT736R, 5500 antenna control…
etc.” IMPORTANT QSL INFO: John, informs OPDX to QSL via John, Graves,
3075 Ohio Street, Miami, FL 33133, when on island. There is no mail from
the island. Also, during the summer he will be in a condo in Montreal:
QSL via John Graves, 1605 Rue Docteur-Penfield #601, Montreal,QC, Canada
H3H 1B2.

[ANS thanks Ohio/Penn DX Bulletin No. 1258 for the above information]

——————————————————————–

ARISS Contacts and Events

Quick list of scheduled contacts and events:

Kiilinik High School, Cambridge Bay, Nunavut, Canada, telebridge via VK4KHZ
The ISS callsign is presently scheduled to be NA1SS
The scheduled astronaut is Jeff Williams KD5TVQ
Contact was successful: Wed 2016-04-06 18:02:20 UTC 55 deg

H.A.L. School, Lucknow, India, telebridge via W6SRJ
The ISS callsign is presently scheduled to be NA1SS
The scheduled astronaut is Jeff Williams KD5TVQ
TBD UTC (***)

Valahia University of Targoviste, Targoviste, Romania, direct via
The ISS callsign is presently scheduled to be OR4ISS
The scheduled astronaut is Jeff Williams KD5TVQ
Contact is a go for: Tue 2016-04-12 13:48:06 UTC 79 deg

Colegio Santa Rosa, Yerba Buena, Argentina, direct via LU1KCQ
The ISS callsign is presently scheduled to be NA1SS
The scheduled astronaut is Jeff Williams KD5TVQ
Contact is a go for: Wed 2016-04-13 14:02:54 UTC 34 deg

USA Science and Engineering Festival, Washington, D.C., telebridge via
IK1SLD
The ISS callsign is presently scheduled to be OR4ISS
The scheduled astronaut is Timothy Peake KG5BVI
Contact is a go for: Sat 2016-04-16 18:19:28 UTC 78 deg

*******************************************************

The next window to submit a proposal for an upcoming contact is now open.
The window is open from 2016-02-15 to 2016-04-15 and would be for contacts
between 2017-01-01 and 2017-06-30.

Check out the ARISS website http://www.ariss.org/ or the ARRL website
http://www.arrl.org/hosting-an-ariss-contact for full details.

[ANS thanks Charlie, AJ9N, for the above information]

——————————————————————–

Geostationary / Geosynchronous Amateur Satellite Transponders

EngineerIT magazine reports on the quest by radio amateurs to get transponders
on geostationary satellites.

The article quotes President of AMSAT DL, Peter Gülzow DB2OS, and describes the
transponders planned for the geostationary Es’Hail-2 satellite, expected to be
operational in 2017 at 26 degrees East.

Also mentioned is a project to build a transponder for a US satellite which
could be in a geosynchronous orbit around 74 degrees West.

Read the EngineerIT article at

Radio amateurs in the quest for geostationary satellites

Es’Hail-2 http://amsat-uk.org/satellites/geosynchronous/eshail-2/

AMSAT Phase 4 Update for Palomar Amateur Radio Club November 4, 2015
http://www.ntms.org/files/Feb2016/PARC_4on4.pdf

[ANS thanks AMSAT-UK for the above information]

——————————————————————–

AIAA/USU Conference on Small Satellites

The AIAA/USU Conference on Small Satellites has become internationally
recognized as the premier conference on small satellites. The annual
gathering provides a forum for the best minds in the small satellite
community to review recent successes, explore new directions, and introduce
emerging technologies in small spacecraft development. In addition to
creating an excellent environment for networking and talking with experts in
military, science, and academic fields, the Conference offers a program of
international relevance, focusing on the key challenges and opportunities
facing the small satellite community today.

Proceedings from 1987 to 2015 are available online and can be accessed at:
http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/smallsat/

[ANS thanks AIAA/USU Conference on Small Satellites amd Utah State
University for the above information]

/EX

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the
President’s Club. Members of the President’s Club, as sustaining
donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive addi-
tional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT
Office.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership
at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students
enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the stu-
dent rate for a maximum of 6 post-secondary years in this status.
Contact Martha at the AMSAT Office for additional student membership
information.

73,
This week’s ANS Editor,
In memory of my Mom. Her tireless efforts to help my independent study
of math and electronics in high school set me on the path to broadcast
engineering, Amateur Satellites, and eventually working as the Eastern Range’s
Superintendent of Range Operations. Thank’s Mom.

Lee McLamb, KU4OS
ku4os at amsat dot org

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE
ANS-094

The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and infor-
mation service of AMSAT North America, The Radio Amateur Satellite
Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in Space
including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur
Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building,
launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio
satellites.

The news feed on http://www.amsat.org publishes news of Amateur
Radio in Space as soon as our volunteers can post it.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to:
ans-editor at amsat.org.

In this edition:

* Replay Available Ham Talk Live! ARISS with Rosalie White, K1STO
* AMSAT Dayton Booth Volunteers Needed
* AMSAT SA SPACE SYMPOSIUM 2016
* The 13th Annual CubeSat Developers’ Workshop
* 2016 VHF SUPER CONFERENCE
* STMSat-1 and MinXSS CubeSats Featured on Public Radio
* Irvine Students Are On a Mission to Launch a Satellite
* Free Tours of Facilities at NASA’s Glenn Research Center
* ARISS News
* Satellite Shorts From All Over

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-094.01
ANS-094 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 094.01
From AMSAT HQ KENSINGTON, MD.
April 3, 2016
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-094.01

Replay Available Ham Talk Live! ARISS with Rosalie White, K1STO

If you missed this past Thursday evening’s Ham Talk Live! show
featuring, Rosalie White, K1STO talking about the Amateur Radio on
the International Space Station (ARISS) program sponsored by ARRL,
AMSAT, and NASA, a replay of the recorded show is available on
http://www.hamtalklive.com.

The discussion took a look back at the start of the ARISS program,
the 1000th QSO that was just completed, and the future of the
program. Also featured were some messages from the ISS. Rosalie also
told of a way you can help.

Ham Talk Live! airs on the web on Thursday nights at 9PM eastern
time. In addition to their hamtalklive.com web site the show can be
found on-line via Spreaker, iTunes, Stitcher, Google Play, YouTube,
SoundCloud, or TuneIn.

[ANS thanks Ham Talk Live! For the above information]

———————————————————————

AMSAT Dayton Booth Volunteers Needed

Call for Volunteers for the AMSAT Booth at Dayton 2016

The 2016 Dayton Hamvention®, sponsored by the Dayton Amateur Radio
Association will be held this year on May 20-22. “Dayton” is the
largest hamfest in the United States, and AMSAT will be there again
this year.

You can assist AMSAT by volunteering to help staff the booth. While
there, you will meet other AMSAT members, interact with the satellite
designers, builders, and operators, and enjoy all that Dayton has to
offer.

People are needed to assist with the setup of the booth on Thursday,
May 19 (A few people to move the equipment from the storage area
leaving the hotel at 9 am, most at the Arena from 11am to 4 pm), to
staff the booth Friday (9 am to 6 pm), Saturday (9 am to 5 pm), and
Sunday (9 am to 1 pm), and pack up on Sunday (1 pm to 3 pm). If you
are leaving late Sunday, or Monday morning, please consider helping
transport the display to the storage area on the south side of
Dayton. This is normally completed by 5 pm. Most people volunteer
for one or more 2 hour shifts in the booth.

Please send an e-mail to Steve Belter, N9IP, n9ip (at) amsat.org, if
you are willing to help AMSAT at the Hamvention. Please let Steve
know as soon as possible if you’re available to assist.

If you missed the Hamvention the last few years, there were some
changes in the Ball Arena, and the AMSAT exhibit was part of that
change. We now have a 3 X 3 booth arrangement, with the
engineering,education, ARISS, and software display on one side of the
aisle, and the membership and Beginner¹s Corner on the opposite side.
The booth numbers are now 444-446 and 433-435. We will be very near
the old exhibit area, within sight of the ARRL exhibit.

[ANS thanks AMSAT.org for the above information]

———————————————————————

AMSAT SA SPACE SYMPOSIUM 2016

The annual AMSAT SA Space Symposium will be held at the Innovation
Hub in Pretoria on 28 May 2016.

The theme is “Make Space Sciences part of your development and free
time activity”

The conference programme will include a real time review on the SA
AMSAT Kletskous CubeSat and papers on other projects, technology and
space science subjects.

This is a call for papers to be included in the proceedings and for
presentation at the conference. The closing date for synopsis has
been extended to 6 April. The final paper will be required in word
format by 30 April 2016. Synopsis must be in word format and
should be sent to saamsat@intekom.co.za .

[ANS thanks AMSAT SA for the above information]

———————————————————————

The 13th Annual CubeSat Developers’ Workshop

The 13th Annual CubeSat Developers’ Workshop (April 20-22, 2016) at
California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo, CA is
just three short weeks away !!

Don’t delay: register now before our Early Bird prices expire! You
can register by following the link, here, or following the link on
our website, cubesat.org. Please note: The prices for professional
attendees will INCREASE in just 6 days, on April 5, 2016!!

[ANS thanks The CubeSat Workshop Team for the above information]

———————————————————————

2016 VHF SUPER CONFERENCE

The upcoming Amateur Radio Technical Conference sponsored by the
Southeastern VHF Society, Northeast Weak Signal Group, and Mt. Airy
Radio Club will be held at the Holiday Inn Washington Dulles Airport
on April 15 to 17. – This year, one large conference is being held in
Lieu of three Eastern conferences.

The aim of the educational conference is to share with our fellow
VHF, UHF, and Microwave enthusiasts, technical achievements and
developments. The technical conference is followed by a dinner,
recognition of door prize contributors, and a drawing for door prizes.

Conference Web-site: http://vhfsuperconference.com

The Conference is affiliated with the ARRL.

Contacts
Mickie Clement, W1MKY
Telephone: 603-428-3840 Email: dpclement at tds.net
Gary Hitchner, WA2OMY Email: gary.hitchner at momentumdynamics.com

[ANS thanks Gary WA2OMY and Mickie W1MKY for the above information]

———————————————————————

STMSat-1 and MinXSS CubeSats Featured on Public Radio

Elementary school, St. Thomas More’s, satellite STMSat-1 and
University of Colorado’s Miniature X-ray Solar Spectrometer
(MinXSS)CubeSat were featured in an interview on Colorado Public
Radio.

The interview of Doug Duncan, director of the Fiske Planetarium in
Boulder by Colorado Matters’ host Ryan Warner.

The interview can be heard at
http://tinyurl.com/ANS094-CPR

The interview is a good overview of cubsats and their capability.

Both satellites are expected to be launched from the ISS in early
April

[ANS thanks Colorado Public Radio for the above information]

———————————————————————

Irvine Students Are On a Mission to Launch a Satellite

The los Angeles Times reports that over a hundred students from five
Irvine high schools and another dozen from a local middle school have
begun a year long collaboration to engineer, launch and place an
operational nanosatellite in orbit.

Teachers from Beckman, Irvine, Northwood and Woodbridge high schools
developed curriculum for teams of 20 to 25 students from each school
to handle the CubeSat mission.

Students from Irvine’s new Portola High School will be brought into
the program when the campus opens in the fall. Students from Rancho
San Joaquin Middle School are involved in the project as a STEM
feeder program. Organizers of the Irving project are in discussions
with a Russian company and have targeted a March 2017 launch date.
Irving Public Schools Foundation have granted $150,000 in seed money
to launch the project.

The schools are planning for three years of missions with a goal of
rolling over in perpetuity depending on funding and future support.

The project is the brain child of Brent Freeze and Kain Sosa,
neighbors in Irvine’s Quail Hill subdivision, who have children in
the school district. Their goal is to support education that requires
specialized science backgrounds and recognize that developing talent
could start with STEM programs in local high schools.

Read the full article at
http://preview.tinyurl.com/ANS094-Irvine

[ANS thanks the LA Times for the above information]

———————————————————————

Free Tours of Facilities at NASA’s Glenn Research Center

NASA’s Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio, is offering tours
that take visitors behind the scenes and inside certain research
facilities. Glenn scientists and engineers serve as guides. Tours and
open house events will be held each month through October 2016. Tours
are free for groups and individuals, but to guarantee admission,
reservations are required. Visitor parking is also free.

On the days of the tours, a bus departs from Glenn’s main gate every
hour, beginning at 10 a.m. The last tour departs at 1 p.m. Each tour
lasts about 45 minutes and is followed by a stop at Glenn’s Gift Shop.

Glenn’s 2016 Tour Schedule

April 2, 2016 — Piloted Control Evaluation Facility and Distributed
Engine Control Laboratory: Visit two laboratories that showcase how
researchers evaluate propulsion control and aircraft engine control.
Tour the Piloted Control Evaluation (Flight Simulator) Facility to
see where researchers evaluate the effect of propulsion control on
aircraft performance. Visit the Distributed Engine Control Laboratory
to learn how NASA evaluates new hardware architectures for aircraft
engine control.

May 21-22, 2016 — Open House at NASA’s Glenn Research Center: NASA
Glenn is opening its doors to the public for a weekend open house.
Visitors will be able to tour many of the center’s world-class
facilities and see how the center improves aviation and fosters
exploration to benefit everyone on Earth. Visitors also will be able
to meet an astronaut and talk with engineers, scientists and
technicians who work on space programs. Registration for this event
is not required.

June 11-12, 2016 — Open House at NASA’s Plum Brook Station: NASA
Glenn is opening the doors of Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio,
to the public for a weekend open house. Visitors will be able to tour
the station’s world-class facilities and step inside the world’s
largest vacuum chamber, which has tested parts of rockets, Mars
landers and Orion hardware. Visitors also will be able to meet an
astronaut and talk with engineers, scientists and technicians.
Registration for this event is not required.

July 9, 2016: Radioisotope Power System, Systems Integration
Laboratory: See how NASA emulates the electrical characteristics of a
spacecraft system in the Radioisotope Power System, Systems
Integration Laboratory. RPS is a source of electricity for NASA space
missions from the surface of Mars to the realm of the outer planets.

Aug. 6, 2016 — See Things a Different Way: Check out Glenn’s
Graphics and Visualization, or GVIS, and the Reconfigurable User-
interface and Virtual Reality Exploration, or GRUVE, Laboratories.
The GVIS lab uses advanced computer input and output devices paired
with a variety of natural user interface devices and 3-D displays.
The GRUVE lab is used to analyze data obtained either by computer
simulation or from research test facilities.

Sept. 10, 2016 — Vibration Testing: Join us on a tour of Glenn’s
Structural Dynamics Laboratory, where things get shaken to verify
their survivability. Several experiments that currently are operating
on the International Space Station were tested in this lab.

Oct. 1, 2016 — Prepare for Impact: Come explore Glenn’s Ballistic
Impact Facility. See the laboratory that helped to identify the cause
of the space shuttle Columbia accident and return NASA’s shuttle
fleet to flight.

Tours are open to U.S. citizens and lawful permanent residents. To
guarantee admission, reservations are required. For more information
on tours and how to make reservations, visit
http://www.nasa.gov/centers/glenn/events/tours.html.

Please direct questions about the tours to
Sheila Reese at sheila.d.reese@nasa.gov.

[ANS thanks NASA Education Express Message — March 31, 2016 for the
above information]

———————————————————————

ARISS News

+ A Successful contact was made between Hirano Junior High School,
Kobe, Japan and Astronaut Tim Kopra KE5UDN using Callsign NA1SS. The
contact began 2016-03-28 11:07 UTC and lasted about nine and a half
minutes. Contact was direct via 8N370H.
ARISS Mentor was Satoshi 7M3TJZ.

+ A Successful contact was made between National Soaring Museum,
Elmira, New York, USA and Astronaut Timothy Peake KG5BVI using
Callsign OR4ISS. The contact began Fri 2016-04-01 18:34:03 UTC and
lasted about nine and a half minutes. Contact was telebridge via
IK1SLD. ARISS Mentor was Dave AA4KN.

Upcoming ARISS Contact Schedule

Kiilinik High School, Cambridge Bay, Nunavut, Canada, telebridge via
VK4KHZ
The ISS callsign is presently scheduled to be NA1SS
The scheduled astronaut is Jeff Williams KD5TVQ
Contact is go for: Wed 2016-04-06 18:02:20 UTC

H.A.L. School, Lucknow, India, telebridge via W6SRJ
The ISS callsign is presently scheduled to be NA1SS
The scheduled astronaut is Tim Kopra KE5UDN
Contact is a go for: Fri 2016-04-08 08:17:46 UTC

The next window to submit a proposal for an upcoming contact in the
United States is now open. The window is open from 2016-02-15 to
2016-04-15 and would be for contacts
between 2017-01-01 and 2017-06-30.

Check out the ARISS website http://www.ariss.org/ or the ARRL website
http://www.arrl.org/hosting-an-ariss-contact for full details.

ARISS is always glad to receive listener reports for the above
contacts. ARISS thanks everyone in advance for their assistance.
Feel free to send your reports to aj9n@amsat.org or aj9n@aol.com.

Here you will find a listing of all scheduled school contacts, and
questions, other ISS related websites, IRLP and Echolink websites, and
instructions for any contact that may be streamed live.
http://www.amsat.org/amsat/ariss/news/arissnews.rtf

Total number of ARISS ISS to earth school events is 1038.
Each school counts as 1 event.
Total number of ARISS ISS to earth school contacts is 1003.
Each contact may have multiple schools sharing the same time slot.
Total number of ARISS supported terrestrial contacts is 47.

A complete year by year breakdown of the contacts may be found in
the file.
http://www.amsat.org/amsat/ariss/news/arissnews.rtf

The following US states and entities have never had an ARISS contact:
Arkansas, Delaware, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Wyoming, American
Samoa, Guam, Northern Marianas Islands, and the Virgin Islands.
Schools in these entities are encouraged to apply for a contact.

[ANS thanks ARISS, Charlie AJ9N and David AA4KN for the above
information]

———————————————————————

Satellite Shorts From All Over

+ JSatTrak Satellite App Released

Developed by Shawn Gano KB3OJE, JSatTrack is written in Java and
allows you to predict the position of any satellite in real time or
in the past or future. It uses advanced SGP4/SDP4 algorithms
developed by NASA/NORAD or customizable high precision solvers to
propagate satellite orbits. The program also allows for easy
updating of current satellite tracking data via CelesTrak.com.
Because this application was written in Java, it should run on
almost any operating system or directly off the web using java web
start!

Questions and comments are welcome at the JSatTrack Forum
http://www.gano.name/shawn/JSatTrak/forum

The JSatTrack App can be downloaded from
http://www.gano.name/shawn/JSatTrak/

[ANS thanks Shawn KB3OJE for the abiove information]

+ Proposal windows for ARISS school contacts are still open in the
United States and Europe.

For more information about scheduled US contacts visit
http://www.arrl.org/hosting-an-ariss-contact

For more information about scheduled European Region contact visit
http://www.ariss-eu.org/school-contacts

[ANS thanks ARISS for the above information]

+ Current profiles of the crew currently aboard the ISS, Expedition
47, can be found at:
http://www.ariss.org/current-iss-crew.html

———————————————————————

/EX

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the
President’s Club. Members of the President’s Club, as sustaining
donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive addi-
tional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT
Office.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership
at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students
enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the stu-
dent rate for a maximum of 6 post-secondary years in this status.
Contact Martha at the AMSAT Office for additional student membership
information.

73,
This week’s ANS Editor,
EMike McCardel, AA8EM (former KC8YLD)
kc8yld at amsat dot org

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE
ANS-087

The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and infor-
mation service of AMSAT North America, The Radio Amateur Satellite
Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in Space
including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur
Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building,
launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio
satellites.

The news feed on http://www.amsat.org publishes news of Amateur
Radio in Space as soon as our volunteers can post it.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to:
ans-editor at amsat.org.

In this edition:

* EO-79 transponder ACTIVE
* Digital Communications Conference Call for Papers
* Call for Papers – CSVHFS 50th Anniversary Conference
* AMSAT at Scottsdale AZ and Radio Society of Tucson Hamfests
* Upcoming AMSAT Events
* Proposal Window for Scheduled US Contacts is Still Open
* SA AMSAT Gets New Name
* 40 Students Learn About Amateur Radio and Satellites
* ARISS News
* Satellite Shorts From All Over

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-087.01
ANS-087 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 087.01
From AMSAT HQ KENSINGTON, MD.
March 27, 2016
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-087.01

EO-79 transponder ACTIVE

On the 25th of March 2016, the EO-79 transponder was activated for a
prolonged period.

The FUNcube transponder subsystem on QB50p1 (EO-79) had been
provided by AMSAT-UK and AMSAT-NL and is a similar subsystem as on
FUNcube-1, but without the telemetry downlink circuitry.

The current software running on EO-79 does experience occasional
reboots. When these reboots happen, the transponder is automatically
turned off and will have to be turned back on by a command station.
The FUNcube team has selected a few command stations to do so, but be
advised the transponder may be off.

TLEs:
AMSAT keps name: EO-79
Celestrak keps Name: QB50P1
Celestrak file: cubesat.txt
NORAD # 40025
COSPAR designator 2014-033-R

Frequencies:
Uplink: 435.035-435.065 MHz LSB
Downlink: 145.935-145.965 MHz USB

EO-79 has been set to only beacon the normal AX.25 beacon every 30
seconds instead of 10 seconds. The beacon frequency is 145.815MHz and
consists of AX.25 frames on BPSK. more details about the downlink can
be found on the ISIS HAM page at http://isispace.nl/HAM/qb50p.html

Just like FUNcube-1, the crystal oscillator circuits exhibit drift
with temperature. This means manual tuning will probably work best.

Lastly, the commanding team availability will be limited over
Easter, so please report the transponder being on or off on the
status page of AMSAT: http://www.amsat.org/status/

It does not appear in the table, but it does in the reporting drop-
down.

[ANS thanks Wouter PA3WEG AMSAT-NL and AMSAT-UK for the above
information]

———————————————————————

Digital Communications Conference Call for Papers

Technical papers are solicited for presentation at the 35th Annual
ARRL/TAPR Digital Communications Conference
(DCC) http://www.tapr.org/dcc.html, to be held September 16-18 in St
Petersburg, Florida. Papers will also be published in the Conference
Proceedings. Authors do not need to attend the conference to have
their papers included in the Proceedings. The submission deadline is
July 31, 2016.

The ARRL/TAPR Digital Communications Conference is an international
forum for technically minded radio amateurs to meet and present new
ideas and techniques. Paper/presentation topic areas include — but
are not limited to — software defined radio (SDR), digital voice,
digital satellite communication, digital signal processing (DSP), HF
digital modes, adapting IEEE 802.11 systems for Amateur Radio, Global
Positioning System (GPS), Automatic Position Reporting System (APRS),
Linux in Amateur Radio, AX.25 updates and Internet operability with
Amateur Radio networks.

Submit papers to via e-mail or via post to
Maty Weinberg, KB1EIB, ARRL, 225 Main St, Newington, CT 06111. Papers
will be published exactly as submitted, and authors will retain all
rights.

[ANS thanks Steve WBIMY for the above information]

———————————————————————

Call for Papers – CSVHFS 50th Anniversary Conference

The Central States VHF Society is soliciting papers, presentations,
and Poster displays for the 50th Annual CSVHFS Conference to be held
in Rochester, Minnesota on 28 – 31 July, 2016. Papers,
presentations, and Posters on all aspects of weak-signal VHF and
above amateur radio are requested. You do not need to attend the
conference, nor present your paper, to have it published in the
Proceedings. Posters will be displayed during the two days of the
Conference.

Topics of interest include (but are not limited to):

* Antennas, including Modeling/Design, Arrays, and Control
* Construction of equipment, such as Transmitters, Receivers, and
Transverters
* RF amplifiers (power amps), including Single-band and Multiband
Vacuum Tube and solidstate
* Pre-amplifiers (low noise)
* Propagation, including Ducting, Sporadic E, and Meteor Scatter, etc.
* Test Equipment, including Homebrew, Using, and making measurements
* Regulatory topics
* Operating, including Contesting, Roving, and DXpeditions
* EME
* Digital Signal Processing (DSP)
* Software-defined Radio (SDR)
* Digitial Modes, such as WSJT, JT65, etc.

Generally, topics not related to weak signal VHF, such as FM
Repeaters and packet radio, are not accepted for presentation or
publication. However, there are always exceptions.

Please contact either the Technical Program Chairman, or the
Proceedings Chairman, at the the e-mail addresses below.

DEADLINES FOR SUBMISSIONS:
For the Proceedings: SUNDAY, 22 MAY 2016
For Presentations to be delivered at the conference: TUESDAY, 5 JULY
2016 For Posters to be displayed at the conference: THURSDAY, 29
JULY 2016.

Further information is available at the CSVHFS web site
(www.csvhfs.org),
“The 2016 Conference,”
“Guidance for Proceedings Authors,”
“Guidance for Presenters,”
“Guidance for Table-top/Poster Displays.”

CONTACTS:
(Note: (replace ‘(at)’ with the @-sign to use the e-mail addresses)
Technical Program Chairman: Barry Malowanchuk, ve4ma (at) shaw.ca
Proceedings Chairman: Glen Overby, kc0iyt (at) arrl.net

[ANS thanks Donn Baker, WA2VOI for the above information]

———————————————————————

AMSAT at Scottsdale AZ and Radio Society of Tucson Hamfests

Patrick STODDARD (WD9EWK/VA7EWK) staffed a table at the Scottsdale
Amateur Radio Club’s “Springfest” hamfest, held in a church parking
lot Saturday, 19 March). This hamfest is one of the 3 major hamfests
for the Phoenix area in the non-summer season, and the good weather
helped to bring the crowds out. Lots of buyers and sellers, and lots
of interest in AMSAT and amateur satellites.

With the launches of AO-85 and the 9 Chinese amateur satellites in
the past 6 months, many hams are taking a closer look at this part of
the hobby. For some, the recent launches and projects currently in
the pipeline are bringing some back to the satellites. Along with
talking about satellites, many copies of AMSAT’s “Getting Started
with Amateur Satellites” flew off my AMSAT table. Demonstrations 6am
(1300 UTC) and 11am (1800 UTC), had nice crowds.

Patrick reports “It was nice to have AO-85 available during the
morning, as SO-50 was not passing by during the morning. I also had 4
other satellites that were used for demonstrations – AO-73, XW-2A, XW-
2C, and XW-2F. The three XW-2 satellites were passing by in the first
couple of hours, and AO-73 and AO-85 came by later in the morning.
For all of these passes, I used my SDRplay SDR receiver for the
downlinks, connected to an 8-inch Windows10 tablet and HDSDR software
running on the tablet.

As I have seen at other recent events, using an SDR receiver makes
for more conversations – and not just in the context of working
satellites. With all of these satellites employing a 70cm uplink and
2m downlink, I didn’t have to worry so much about the sunlight making
the tablet’s LCD panel unreadable. Once I set my downlink frequency
on the tablet, and for AO-85 activate AFC in HDSDR to track the
downlink, I only had to worry about using the wheel on a Bluetooth
mouse for fine-tuning. Despite some QRM in the area of the hamfest
site, northeast of a nearby airport, the SDRplay did a decent job
hearing all of these downlinks. For AO-73 and AO-85, I was able to
play back the RF recordings I made with HDSDR later at home, so I
could upload telemetry to each satellite’s telemetry server from
those passes. By the way, HDSDR’s recordings do a much better job
picking up AO-73 telemetry than I ever saw when I used the FUNcube
Dashboard to directly receive the telemetry and then upload the data
to the FUNcube data warehouse server. Same thing for copying AO-85
telemetry – HDSDR’s RF recordings do better for capturing the data
than I saw when using the FoxTelem software to directly control my
FUNcube Dongle Pro+.”

For those who worked WD9EWK during those demonstrations, Patrick
thanks you! The demonstrations make a positive impression on this
part of the hobby for the crowds. His mockup of the AO-85 satellite –
a 4-inch cube of wood, with two whips representing the antennas
coming out of two sides, also helped to reinforce that small
satellites can do more than “beep” in orbit. AO-73 and AO-85, in
particular, are great examples of what we can do with small
satellites. Patrick’s contacts from these demonstartions were
uploaded to his log to Logbook of the World. He will be happy to send
QSL cards to anyone who would like one for QSOs during the hamfest
(just e-mail Patrick with the QSO details – no need to send him a
card or self-addressed stamped envelope).

Patrick will have an AMSAT table at the Radio Society of Tucson’s
annual hamfest on Saturday morning, 26 March 2016. The hamfest will
be at the Target store on Old Spanish Trail, near the intersection of
22nd Street and Harrison, in Tucson AZ. The hamfest is scheduled to
run from 6am to 11am (1300 to 1800 UTC). More information about the
hamfest is available at the club’s web site at:
http://www.k7rst.org/

Afterwards he plans on making a long drive east to a point along I-
10 on the DM52xf/DM62af grid boundary, west of Deming in New Mexico.
He hopes to work a few passes from there in the mid- to late-
afternoon, and possibly into the evening. If he is not at the grid
boundary in time for FO-29 and/or AO-7 passes, he may stop to work
those passes wherever he might be – likely somewhere in grid DM52, in
either Arizona or New Mexico. He definitely plans on being at this
grid boundary in time for SO-50 passes starting just after 2200 UTC
Saturday afternoon. Weather and law enforcement permitting (this area
is near the USA/Mexico border), He may try to stick around into the
early evening before making the 300-mile/500km drive home from that
area.

While on the road, his location should be visible via APRS. There is
good APRS coverage in southeastern Arizona and southwestern New
Mexico. He will use WD9EWK-9 as his call sign for APRS, which should
show up online at (among other sites):
http://aprs.fi/WD9EWK-9

He will use my @WD9EWK Twitter feed to post updates during the
afternoon and early. For those who don’t use Twitter he can be
followed using a web browser:
http://twitter.com/WD9EWK

Contacts will be uploaded to his log to Logbook of the World, and
will ensure QSOs from the grid boundary carry both grids. If you
would like a QSL card for a QSO with WD9EWK, please e-mail Patrick
directly with the QSO details. If you’re in the log, he will be happy
to mail you a card without you having to send him a QSL card or SASE.

[ANS thanks Patrick WD9EWK/VA7EWK for the above information]

———————————————————————

Upcoming AMSAT Events

AMSAT Events

Information about AMSAT activities at other important events around
the country. Examples of these events are radio club meetings where
AMSAT Area Coordinators give presentations, demonstrations of working
amateur satellites, and hamfests with an AMSAT presence (a table with
AMSAT literature and merchandise, sometimes also with presentations,
forums, and/or demonstrations).

+ Saturday, 26 March 2016 – Tucson Spring Hamfest in Tucson AZ

+ Friday through Sunday, 29 April-1 May 2016, ARRL Nevada State
Convention in Las Vegas NV

+ Saturday, 7 May 2016 – Cochise Amateur Radio Association Hamfest in
Sierra Vista AZ

+ Saturday, 14 May 2016 – Matanuska Amateur Radio Association Hamfest
in Wasilla AK

+ Friday through Sunday, 20, 21, 22 May 2016 – AMSAT at Dayton
Hamvention. There will be the usual activities including a booth in
the Ball Arena, demonstrations from an area outside the Ball Arena,
and a forum on Saturday (21 May). We will also have a number of
both formal and informal social activities including the popular
get-together at Tickets Thursday evening, and the TAPR/AMSAT banquet
Friday night at the Kohler Presidential Banquet Center.

+ Saturday, 4 June 2016 – White Mountain Hamfest in Show Low AZ

[ANS thanks AMSAT-NA for the above information]

———————————————————————

Proposal Window for Scheduled US Contacts is Still Open

Message to US Educators
Amateur Radio on the International Space Station
Contact Opportunity

Call for Proposals
Proposal Window February 15 – April 15, 2016

The Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) Program
is seeking formal and informal education institutions and
organizations, individually or working together, to host an Amateur
Radio contact with a crew member on board the ISS. ARISS anticipates
that the contact would be held between January 1, 2017 and June 30,
2017. Crew scheduling and ISS orbits will determine the exact contact
dates. To maximize these radio contact opportunities, ARISS is
looking for organizations that will draw large numbers of
participants and integrate the contact into a well-developed
education plan.

The deadline to submit a proposal is April 15, 2016. Proposal
information and documents can be found at
www.arrl.org/hosting-an-ariss-contact.

The Opportunity
Crew members aboard the International Space Station will participate
in scheduled Amateur Radio contacts. These radio contacts are
approximately 10 minutes in length and allow students and educators
to interact with the astronauts through a question-and-answer
session.

An ARISS contact is a voice-only communication opportunity via
Amateur Radio between astronauts and cosmonauts aboard the space
station and classrooms and communities. ARISS contacts afford
education audiences the opportunity to learn firsthand from
astronauts what it is like to live and work in space and to learn
about space research conducted on the ISS. Students also will have an
opportunity to learn about satellite communication, wireless
technology, and radio science. Because of the nature of human
spaceflight and the complexity of scheduling activities aboard the
ISS, organizations must demonstrate flexibility to accommodate
changes in contact dates and times.

Amateur Radio organizations around the world, NASA, and space
agencies in Russia, Canada, Japan and Europe sponsor this educational
opportunity by providing the equipment and operational support to
enable direct communication between crew on the ISS and students
around the world via Amateur Radio. In the US, the program is managed
by AMSAT (Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation) and ARRL (American
Radio Relay League) in partnership with NASA.

More Information
Interested parties can find more information about the program at
www.ariss.org and www.arrl.org/ARISS.

For proposal information and more details such as expectations,
proposal guidelines and proposal form, and dates and times of
Information Sessions go to
http://www.arrl.org/hosting-an-ariss-contact.

Please direct any questions to ariss@arrl.org.

[ANS thanks ARISS for the above information]

———————————————————————

SA AMSAT Gets New Name

SA AMSAT has changed the SA in its name around and will now be
known as AMSAT SA. The amateur radio satellite group made the
decision to line up its name with the organisation’s web address. It
was confusing having the name and web address different. It now also
follows the international trend of other AMSAT organisations. AMSAT
SA has also been registered as a non-profit company and is in the
process of applying for tax exemption status with SARS.
Membership conditions of the organisation remain the same. To get
more information visit the www.amsatsa.org.za or down load a free
copy of the March 2016 Ezine available from Monday 28 March 2016

[ANS thanks the South African Radio League (SARL) News for Sunday 27
March 2016 for the above information]

———————————————————————

40 Students Learn About Amateur Radio and Satellites

On Wednesday last week 40 leaners from schools around Pretoria
attended a morning workshop about amateur radio and satellites. The
workshop was part of the Innovation Hub holiday programme during
which grade 10 and 11 leaners are exposed to various work and science
situations. AMSAT SA was invited to talk about space related
activities. The workshop was presented by Nico van Rensburg ZS6QL and
Hans van de Groenendaal ZS6AKV. The workshop started with a talk
about amateur radio illustrated by short video clips. During
practical demonstrations the learners were shown how a transponder
works, how satellites orbit around the world and how antennas are
used to track satellites including using smartphone applications.

[ANS thanks the South African Radio League (SARL) News for Sunday 27
March 2016 for the above information]

———————————————————————

ARISS News

+ A Successful contact was made between Booker T. Washington Senior
High, Miami, Florida, USA and Astronaut Timothy Peake KG5BVI using
Callsign NA1SS. The contact began 2016-03-14 15:48 UTC and lasted
about nine and a half minutes. Contact was direct via W4SVI.
ARISS Mentors were Steve W1HQL and Ryan W4NTR.

+ A Successful contact was made between Walter Jackson Elementary,
Decatur, Alabama, USA and Astronaut Timothy Peake KG5BVI using
Callsign NA1SS. The contact began 2016-03-18 13:53 UTC and lasted
about nine and a half minutes. Contact was direct via N8DEU.
ARISS Mentor was John K4SQC

Upcoming ARISS Contact Schedule

Hirano Junior High School, Kobe, Japan, direct via 8N370H
The ISS callsign is presently scheduled to be NA1SS
The scheduled astronaut is Tim Kopra KE5UDN
Contact is a go for: Mon 2016-03-28 11:07:49 UTC 56 deg

National Soaring Museum, Elmira, New York, telebridge via IK1SLD
The ISS callsign is presently scheduled to be OR4ISS
The scheduled astronaut is Timothy Peake KG5BVI
Contact is a go for: Fri 2016-04-01 18:34:03 UTC

[ANS thanks ARISS, Charlie AJ9N and David AA4KN for the above
information]

[ANS thanks ARISS, Charlie AJ9N information]

———————————————————————

Satellite Shorts From All Over

International Space Station Panoramic Tour

This 360° panorama allows you to explore the International Space
Station’s third module, Zvezda. Launched on 12 July 2000, the Russian
module supplies life support for the Station and crewquarters. All
five of Europe’s Automated Transfer Vehicles docked with the module.
The images to create this view were taken by ESA astronaut Samantha
Cristoforetti during her Futura mission in 2015; the cosmonaut in the
picture is Gennady Padalka.

http://tinyurl.com/ANS087-Zvezda

[ANS thanks the European Space Agency for the above information]

———————————————————————

/EX

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the
President’s Club. Members of the President’s Club, as sustaining
donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive addi-
tional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT
Office.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership
at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students
enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the stu-
dent rate for a maximum of 6 post-secondary years in this status.
Contact Martha at the AMSAT Office for additional student membership
information.

73,
This week’s ANS Editor,
EMike McCardel, AA8EM (former KC8YLD)
kc8yld at amsat dot org

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE
ANS-080

The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and infor-
mation service of AMSAT North America, The Radio Amateur Satellite
Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in Space
including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur
Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building,
launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio
satellites.

The news feed on http://www.amsat.org publishes news of Amateur
Radio in Space as soon as our volunteers can post it.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to:
ans-editor at amsat.org.

In this edition:

* AMSAT Forum Speakers at Dayton
* Just-Launched ISS Expedition 47/48 Crew Increment Includes Two Radio Amateurs
* UK Student Balloon Crosses Pacific

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-080.01
ANS-080 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 080.01
From AMSAT HQ Kensington, MD.
March 20, 2016
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-080.01

AMSAT Forum Speakers at Dayton

The AMSAT forum will be Saturday morning from 11:15 a.m. through 1:30 p.m.
in Forum Room 5. See the commercial vendor layout map in the Hamvention
program or the Hamvention website for the location of Forum Room 5 (same
as the last few years).

The following speakers will be presenting at the AMSAT Forum:

Moderator: Mark Hammond, N8MH

“AMSAT Status Report” Barry Baines, WD4ASW, AMSAT-NA President, will
highlight recent activities within AMSAT and discuss some of our
challenges, accomplishments, projects, and any late breaking news.

“AMSAT-NA Satellite Program” Jerry Buxton, N0JY, AMSAT-NA Engineering Vice
President, will review the upcoming launches of four Fox spacecraft and
exciting new engineering developments.

“AMSAT’s HEO and GSO Plans” Bob McGwier, N4HY, AMSAT-NA Director, will
discuss AMSAT-NA opportunities for High Earth Orbit and Geo-Synchronous
Orbit satellites.

“AMSAT Satellite Operations” Drew Glasbrenner, KO4MA, AMSAT-NA Operations
Vice President, will survey the current operational amateur satellites, as
well as those planned for launch in the next year.

“ARISS Report 2016” Frank Bauer, KA3HDO, AMSAT-NA Vice President for Human
Spaceflight, will discuss ARISS developments & operation on the
International Space Station.

“Teaching STEM Using the Fox Satellites” Joe Spier, K6WAO, AMSAT-NA
Educational Relations Vice President, will explain how the Fox MEMS
gyroscopes, radiation experiments, and cameras will be used to teach
Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM).

[ANS thanks Steve, N9IP, for the above information]

———————————————————————

Just-Launched ISS Expedition 47/48 Crew Increment Includes Two Radio Amateurs

The Expedition 47/48 crew increment of Astronaut Jeff Williams, KD5TVQ, and
Cosmonauts Oleg Skripochka, RN3FU, and Alexey Ovchinin, is on its way to the
International Space Station (ISS). Their Soyuz TMA-20M launched from the
Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on March 18 at 2126 UTC. The trio now is
safely in orbit.

“During their 6-month mission, the expedition crew members will facilitate
approximately 250 research investigations and technology demonstrations not
possible on Earth,” NASA said. “Science conducted also will enable future long-
duration human and robotic exploration into deep space and on the agency’s
journey to Mars.”

Williams, Skripochka, and Ovchinin will join Expedition 47 Commander Tim Kopra,
KE5UDN, European Space Agency astronaut Tim Peake, KG5BVI/GB1SS, and cosmonaut
Yuri Malenchenko, RK3DUP. Williams will take command of the station on June 4
for Expedition 48. The three will return to Earth in early September.

This mission marks Williams’ fourth spaceflight and will be his third long-
duration stay on the orbiting laboratory — a first for an American. It’s also
his first time back to the ISS since its completion in 2011. By the time his
duty tour ends in September, Williams will become the new American record holder
for cumulative days in space — 534 — surpassing Expedition 46 Commander Scott
Kelly, who wrapped up his 1-year mission on March 1.

[ANS thanks ARRL for the above information]

———————————————————————

UK Student Balloon Crosses Pacific

On Thursday, March 17 the UBSEDS14 balloon, launched by University of Bristol
students, had successfully crossed the Pacific and was above Arizona, having
traveled over 24,500 km since launch. By March 19 the balloon had crossed the
United States and was headed out across the Atlantic Ocean.

The University of Bristol Students for the Exploration and Development of Space
(UBSEDS) launched their balloon on Monday, March 8. Powered by a single AA
Lithium Energiser Battery (LR91) the balloon has been transmitting about 5dBm of
Contestia 16/1000 on 434.600 MHz USB at 4 minute intervals as well as APRS
during its flight at an altitude of about 11,000m.

The balloon uses the error-correcting Contestia 16/1000 mode on 434.6MHz USB.

The transmission power on this band was measured to be +5dBm on a similar board,
which is well below the +10dBm limit for ISM band operation. Each packet was
preceded by 10 seconds of 1Hz pips for manual alignment and a RSID tone for
automatic alignment with suitable software (dl-fldigi for example). For many
countries the balloon transmits APRS packets on local frequencies. In particular
this is 144.8MHz in Europe, 144.66MHz in Japan and 144.39MHz in North America.

The balloon has a diameter of 1.5m and the payload weighs just 21.3 grams.
Despite the weight constraints the team have managed to employ sophisticated
Geofencing technology to prevent the balloon transmitting when over certain
countries and also to select different APRS frequencies depending on the
territory being overflown.

UBSEDS14 information is available at
http://www.bristol-seds.co.uk/hab/flight/2016/03/07/ubseds14.html

UBSEDS14 balloon launch
http://www.southgatearc.org/news/2016/march/ubseds14_balloon_launches_today.htm

One of the students involved in the project is Richard Meadows M0SBU. He took
the amateur radio courses run by the Chelmsford Amateur Radio Society (CARS) at
Danbury in Essex. Further information on the courses is available from the CARS
Training Manager
Email: training2016 at g0mwt.org.uk
Web: http://g0mwt.org.uk/training

[ANS thanks AMSAT-UK for the above information]

/EX

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the
President’s Club. Members of the President’s Club, as sustaining
donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive addi-
tional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT
Office.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership
at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students
enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the stu-
dent rate for a maximum of 6 post-secondary years in this status.
Contact Martha at the AMSAT Office for additional student membership
information.

73,
This week’s ANS Editor,
Lee McLamb, KU4OS
ku4os at amsat dot org

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE
ANS-073

The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and infor-
mation service of AMSAT North America, The Radio Amateur Satellite
Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in Space
including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur
Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building,
launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio
satellites.

The news feed on http://www.amsat.org publishes news of Amateur
Radio in Space as soon as our volunteers can post it.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to:
ans-editor at amsat.org.

In this edition:

* ARISS Celebrates School Contact #1000!
* AMSAT/TAPR Banquet at the Dayton Hamvention
* Fox-1Cliff and Fox-1D Waiting for delivery to Spaceflight Industries
* The CBS “This Morning” show reportsa on STMSat-1
* Supporting Disaster Communications from Space
* Proposal Window for Scheduled US Contacts is Open
* Application Window Open for ARISS Europe Region
* ARISS News
* Satellite Shorts From All Over

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-073.01
ANS-073 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 073.01
From AMSAT HQ KENSINGTON, MD.
March 13, 2016
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-073.01

ARISS Celebrates School Contact #1000!

March 10, 2016: Today the Amateur Radio on the International Space
Station team (ARISS team) proudly celebrated its 1000th school radio
contact!

The very first ARISS contact took place in 2000, and Astronaut Tim
Kopra, amateur call sign KE5UDN, on the International Space Station
(ISS) did the honors for today’s 1000th link-up to the University of
North Dakota. Kopra spoke in real time to excited scholars in Grand
Forks at the event organized by the North Dakota Space Grant
Consortium (NDSGC). An additional program milestone—this was the
first amateur radio contact with the ISS that has been hosted in
North Dakota.

During the 10-minute ARISS contact Astronaut Kopra answered
questions formulated by 20 different pupils in kindergarten all the
way up to graduate school. A member of the winning 10th grade team
from the Space Grant’s high altitude balloon competition last fall
was awarded one of the slots to interview Kopra.

An ARISS event is more than the amateur radio contact, and in this
case the NDSGC team that included college student volunteers made
multiple visits to pupils in the second through fifth grades at
Emerado Elementary (Emerado, ND); Highland Elementary (Crookston,
MN); Century Elementary (Grafton, ND); Century Elementary (Grand
Forks, ND); and Discover Elementary (Grand Forks, ND). The university
teams led the young students in hands-on activities and learning
about aerospace, priming the youth for the interview with Kopra. The
students, many from smaller rural communities, built and launched
rockets, crafted and tested parachutes similar to those on NASA’s
Orion capsule, and designed and tested neutral buoyant objects.

Students in today’s audience for the 1000th contact numbered 500. TV
and newspaper reporters captured the action; the university media
team filmed it, and live-streaming was handled by John Spasojevich,
amateur radio call sign AG9D.

One student asked Tim, “What advice would you give to students, such
as myself, who wish to work for NASA one day?” Tim advised: “Study
very hard and work hard in school because if you do well in school
you’ll learn a lot and it’s like money in the bank for you and your
future career.” A UND staff member said, “Experiential learning has
proven to be the most effective method of knowledge retention, so
this [ARISS] experience would grant them [students] the skills
necessary to be successful individuals in their future careers. The
problem-solving, creativity, and perseverance required by radio
communications are cross-disciplinary skills that students can
utilize as they enter STEM fields and careers, enhancing the NASA-
relevant workforce of North Dakota.”

Frank Bauer, International Chairman for ARISS congratulated the
ARISS team on this noteworthy accomplishment:
“With the outstanding support of NASA and the International Space
Agencies participating in ISS, the ISS on-orbit crew members
encompassing all 48 expeditions and the hundreds of ARISS volunteers
world-wide, the ARISS team has reached a tremendous milestone: 1000
ARISS contacts between schools on the ground and the ISS crews on-
orbit. Since our first contact in December 2000 to today’s contact in
North Dakota, hundreds of thousands of students have participated in
hands-on STEM learning that ARISS affords and many millions from the
general public have witnessed Human Spaceflight in action through an
ARISS contact. My congratulations to the ARISS international team and
our ARISS stakeholders and sponsors on this phenomenal
accomplishment!”

The NASA ISS Program Office produced several videos to celebrate the
achievement of ARISS contact #1000, and the first three are online at:

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS)

ARISS: 1,000 Calls and Counting

ARISS: Talking to Astronauts

ARISS telebridge station W6SRJ operators Tim Bosma, W6MU, and Don
Dalby, KE6UAY, in Santa Rosa, California, skillfully supported the
North Dakota ham radio linkup as the ISS passed overhead, relaying
astronaut Tim Kopra’s radio signal to the students. Charlie Sufana,
AJ9N, the ARISS Mentor from the Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation
(AMSAT) and the lead operator for ARISS Contact #1, guided the UND
Dakota Student Amateur Radio Association and the FORX Amateur Radio
Club in all aspects of the ARISS contact.

Congratulations go to the entire ARISS team on its #1000 successful
amateur radio contact with ISS astronauts and cosmonauts!

About ARISS:
Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) is a
cooperative venture of international amateur radio societies and the
space agencies that support the International Space Station (ISS). In
the United States, sponsors are the Radio Amateur Satellite
Corporation (AMSAT), the American Radio Relay League (ARRL), the
Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS) and the
National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The primary
goal of ARISS is to promote exploration of science, technology,
engineering, and mathematics (STEM) topics by organizing scheduled
contacts via amateur radio between crew members aboard the ISS and
students in classrooms or informal education venues. With the help of
experienced amateur radio volunteers, ISS crews speak directly with
large audiences in a variety of public forums. Before and during
these radio contacts, students, teachers, parents, and communities
learn about space, space technologies, and amateur radio.

For more information, see www.ariss.org, www.amsat.org, and
www.arrl.org.

Join us on Facebook: Amateur Radio on the ISS (ARISS)
Follow us on Twitter: ARISS_status

[ANS thanks ARISS for the above information]

———————————————————————

AMSAT/TAPR Banquet at the Dayton Hamvention

The tenth annual joint AMSAT/TAPR Banquet will be held on Friday
evening, May 20th. This dinner is one of the main AMSAT activities
during the Hamvention. Tickets ($35 each) may be purchased from the
AMSAT store at www.amsat.org. The banquet ticket purchase deadline
is Tuesday, May 17th.

The Banquet will take place at the Kohler Presidential Banquet
Center, 4572 Presidential Way, Kettering, OH 45429 (just south of
Dayton). Doors open at 6:30 p.m. for a cash bar with the buffet
dinner served at 7:00 p.m.

AMSAT and TAPR alternate the task of providing a speaker for the
banquet. It is AMSAT¹s responsibility this year.

Michelle Thompson, W5NYV, will present “It¹s just software, right?”
She will survey the AMSAT Ground Terminal: Who, what, when, where,
why, and how we¹re designing open source radio solutions for the next
generation of AMSAT payloads.

Michelle is AMSAT¹s Team Leader for the design and execution of the
AMSAT Ground Terminal. The goal is to create a ³5 and Dime² (5 and
10 GHz) digital SDR transceiver that will support both voice and data
modes, for both general QSOs and emergency communication, for the
Phase 4B satellite and for future AMSAT projects. This is an effort
to design an inexpensive ground terminal for amateurs that would cost
tens of thousands of dollars commercially, for as much under $1,000
as we can get it.

A true renaissance woman, in addition to being an engineer and a
licensed amateur radio operator, Michelle has worked for Qualcomm,
attends Burning Man, and is a longtime DEFCON participant. She is
also the lead for Organ Donor (an AI pipe organ). Her Phase 4B Weekly
Ground Engineering Reports are fascinating reading.

Seating is limited to the number of meals we reserve with the Kohler
caterers based on the number of tickets sold by the deadline. Tickets
purchased online may be collected at the Books, Shirts & Memberships
corner of the AMSAT booth (445-446).

[ANS thanks Steve N9IP and the AMSAT Office for the above information]

———————————————————————

Fox-1Cliff and Fox-1D Waiting for delivery to Spaceflight Industries

Fox-1Cliff and Fox-1D successfully finished environmental testing on
February 8 and are now ready and waiting for delivery to Spaceflight
Industries for integration into their Sherpa payload dispenser which
will be making its maiden flight. Launch is on target to occur in
in the first half of 2016 on a SpaceX Falcon 9.

The CubeSats will be kept in a clean condition sealed in anti-static
bags, opened occasionally to charge the batteries so that they are
fully topped off for delivery.

Launched into a sun synchronous orbit, Fox-1Cliff and Fox-1D will
both carry an FM repeater as Fox-1A (AO-85) has, as well as a camera
experiment built by students at Virginia Tech which will take images
of Earth for downlink in the high speed Data Mode. Fox-1Cliff will
also contain a radiation experiment from Vanderbilt University ISDE
like that in AO-85, and Fox-1D will host the University of Iowa HERCI
(High Energy Radiation CubeSat Instrument) experiment to map the Van
Allen radiation belts.

With Fox-1Cliff and Fox-1D completed, the Fox Engineering Team is
focusing on RadFxSat/Fox-1B which is currently set to launch in
January, 2017.

[ANS thanks Jerry N0JY for the above information]

———————————————————————

The CBS “This Morning” show reports on STMSat-1

The CBS This Morning show reports on an amateur radio SSTV satellite
built by elementary students which is to be deployed in space in the
coming days

Astronauts on the International Space Station have conducted
hundreds of experiments and launched many satellites, but now they
are set to deploy a satellite that elementary age students at a
school in Virginia built. Their satellite hitched a ride on a NASA
rocket late last year, and it will be released into space in the next
few days. Mark Albert reports.

Watch the CBS report at
http://tinyurl.com/ANS073-STMSat-on-CBS

For the latest deployment date check the STMSat-1 Twitter account
https://twitter.com/STMSAT11

Deployment Update
In a tweet from STMSAT-1 on Saturday:
“Looks like I will be a houseguest just a bit longer. With 4
launches in the next 20 days. astronauts are quite busy! Try again. 3
weeks.”

[ANS thanks CBS and Southgate ARN for the above information]

———————————————————————

Supporting Disaster Communications from Space

Conventional lines of communication can be impacted after a
disaster. This we know. Phone lines can go down, cell service can be
overrun with calls, texts, and emails and it can be difficult for
survivors as well as first responders to get in touch. This isn’t a
far-fetched scenario or intellectual exercise. It’s a reality we’ve
seen happen over and over during disasters small and large.

Enter Amateur Radio—or what those involved in the hobby refer to as
“ham radio.”

Amateur radio enthusiasts—or “hams” as they’re often called—often
step in during emergencies to help bridge communication gaps between
first responders to keep people safe when smartphones, cell towers,
and internet technologies we rely on every day go down. Volunteer
hams also serve as a valuable source of information during the
initial states of an emergency. Often, hams provide this public
service in association with volunteer groups like Community Emergency
Response Teams, who are always ready to spring into action quickly
and effectively.1

We owe it to these volunteers to do everything we can to support
their work to help communities bounce back when disaster strikes.
That’s why we’ve partnered with the American Radio Relay League and
researchers from Virginia Tech’s Ted and Karyn Hume Center for
National Security and Technology in Blacksburg, Virginia—one of the
leaders in amateur radio technology—to develop a new communications
satellite that will help amateur radio operators transmit radio
signals across the United States 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.
After all, disasters can happen any place and any time.

With this new satellite, scheduled to launch in 2017, Hams involved
in supporting disaster communications will have a more reliable
connection and a new level of capability in their communications.2
Right now, radio signals used by amateurs must often be bounced off
the ionosphere to accommodate communication over long distances.
Unfortunately, this type of radio propagation isn’t reliable because
signal reach and quality can be impacted or even halted by space
weather events like solar flares and geomagnetic storms.2 This
satellite is unique because it will provide another layer of support
for emergency services­ by providing a dedicated communications hub
for hams orbiting above the U.S. in geosynchronous orbit every day.
It will help emergency managers deployed to disasters support long-
term communications for first responders on the ground—and become
another invaluable tool at their disposal.2

Amateur radio operators have come to the rescue on more than one
occasion—like during Hurricane Sandy—when landlines and cell phones
were left out of commission throughout New York and New Jersey.

Hams also made a difference in 2013, when Colorado was hit with
historic flooding. As floodwaters ravaged areas across the state,
they threatened a wastewater plant that served over 80,000 people.
Volunteers from the Amateur Radio Emergency Service—the American
Radio Relay League’s disaster communications arm—leapt into action,
creating a network to monitor the situation and collect data. As a
result, they were able to take remote control of the facility and
helped prevent any wastewater from spilling out with the floods.3

This new partnership with hams will help make our communities more
resilient, and we look forward to a successful launch.

FEMA Editor’s Note: Jessica Stapf contributed research to this post.

Sources:

Amateur Radio Relay League Page: Amateur Radio Emergency Communication
http://www.arrl.org/amateur-radio-emergency-communication

Virginia Tech Press Release: “First amateur radio in geosynchronous
orbit will aid disaster communications.”
http://tinyurl.com/ANS073-VTGeo

Case Study: Amateur Radio Volunteers Protect Community Water Supply
http://tinyurl.com/ANS073-CaseStudy

[ANS thanks Rafael Lemaitre and FEMA for the above information]

———————————————————————

Proposal Window for Scheduled US Contacts is Open

Message to US Educators
Amateur Radio on the International Space Station
Contact Opportunity

Call for Proposals
Proposal Window February 15 – April 15, 2016

The Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) Program
is seeking formal and informal education institutions and
organizations, individually or working together, to host an Amateur
Radio contact with a crew member on board the ISS. ARISS anticipates
that the contact would be held between January 1, 2017 and June 30,
2017. Crew scheduling and ISS orbits will determine the exact contact
dates. To maximize these radio contact opportunities, ARISS is
looking for organizations that will draw large numbers of
participants and integrate the contact into a well-developed
education plan.

The deadline to submit a proposal is April 15, 2016. Proposal
information and documents can be found at
www.arrl.org/hosting-an-ariss-contact.

The Opportunity
Crew members aboard the International Space Station will participate
in scheduled Amateur Radio contacts. These radio contacts are
approximately 10 minutes in length and allow students and educators
to interact with the astronauts through a question-and-answer
session.

An ARISS contact is a voice-only communication opportunity via
Amateur Radio between astronauts and cosmonauts aboard the space
station and classrooms and communities. ARISS contacts afford
education audiences the opportunity to learn firsthand from
astronauts what it is like to live and work in space and to learn
about space research conducted on the ISS. Students also will have an
opportunity to learn about satellite communication, wireless
technology, and radio science. Because of the nature of human
spaceflight and the complexity of scheduling activities aboard the
ISS, organizations must demonstrate flexibility to accommodate
changes in contact dates and times.

Amateur Radio organizations around the world, NASA, and space
agencies in Russia, Canada, Japan and Europe sponsor this educational
opportunity by providing the equipment and operational support to
enable direct communication between crew on the ISS and students
around the world via Amateur Radio. In the US, the program is managed
by AMSAT (Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation) and ARRL (American
Radio Relay League) in partnership with NASA.

More Information
Interested parties can find more information about the program at
www.ariss.org and www.arrl.org/ARISS.

For proposal information and more details such as expectations,
proposal guidelines and proposal form, and dates and times of
Information Sessions go to
http://www.arrl.org/hosting-an-ariss-contact.

Please direct any questions to ariss@arrl.org.

[ANS thanks ARISS for the above information]

———————————————————————

Application Window Open for ARISS Europe Region

Schools and Youth organizations in the ARISS-Europe Region (Europe,
Africa and Middle East) interested in setting up an ARISS radio
contact with an astronaut onboard the International Space Station are
invited to submit an application and an educational project. The
application submission window will be open February 1 to April 30,
2016, for space conversations that will tentatively be scheduled in
the period extending from February to June 2017.

Please see http://www.ariss-eu.org/school-contacts for details and
an application.

[ANS thanks ARISS for the above information]

———————————————————————

ARISS News

+ A Successful contact was made between Slovanské Gymnázium Olomouc,
Olomouc, Moravia, Czech Republic and Astronaut Timothy Peake KG5BVI
using Callsign OR4ISS. The contact began 2016-03-08 08:22 UTC and
lasted about nine and a half minutes. Contact was direct via OK2KYJ.
ARISS Mentor was Armand SP3QFE. This was the 998th ARISS contact.

+ A Successful contact was made between Atlanta Science Festival,
Atlanta, Georgia and Astronaut Tim Kopra KE5UDN using Callsign
NA1SS. The contact began 2016-03-08 16:11 UTC and lasted about nine
and a half minutes. Contact was telebridge] via K6DUE.
ARISS Mentor was John K4SQC. This was the 999th ARISS contact.

+ A Successful contact was made between North Dakota Space Grant
Consortium (NDSGC), Grand Forks, North Dakota, USA and Astronaut Tim
Kopra KE5UDN using Callsign NA1SS. The contact began 2016-03-10
19:07:08 UTC and lasted about nine and a half minutes. Contact was
telebridge via W6SRJ.
ARISS Mentor was Charlie AJ9N. This was the 1000th ARISS contact.

Editor’s Note:
Last week the Mentors for the successful ARISS contacts were
misreported. AA8EM assumes full responsibility for the error. Below
are the correct mentors for contacts #995, #996 and #997.

The mentor for contact #995 on 2/29/2016 between Tim Kopra KE5UDN
and Gesamtschule Leverkusen Schlebusch, Leverkusen, Germany, was
Peter IN3GHZ.

The Mentor for contact #996 on 3/1/2016 between Tim Kopra KE5UDN and
National Urban Alliance for Effective Education (NUA), Syosset, New
York, was Dave AA4KN.

The mentor for contact #997 on 3/5/2016 between Timothy Peake KG5BVI
and Powys Secondary Schools, Mid Wales, UK was Ciaran MØXTD.

Upcoming ARISS Contact Schedule

Booker T. Washington Senior High, Miami, Florida, direct via W4SVI
The ISS callsign is presently scheduled to be NA1SS
The scheduled astronaut is Timothy Peake KG5BVI
Contact is a go for: Mon 2016-03-14 15:48:48 UTC

Walter Jackson Elementary, Decatur, Alabama, direct via N8DEU
The ISS callsign is presently scheduled to be NA1SS
The scheduled astronaut is Tim Kopra KE5UDN
Contact is a go for: Thu 2016-03-17 14:46:07 UTC

[ANS thanks ARISS, Charlie AJ9N and David AA4KN for the above
information]

———————————————————————

Satellite Shorts From All Over

+ Patrick Stoodard WD9EWK will be part of the booth for the
University of Arizona’s radio club (K7UAZ) for this weekend’s
ScienceCity science fair, on the University of Arizona campus in
Tucson AZ. This is a two-day event, on Saturday and Sunday (12 and
13 March 2016). The event will be open from 9.30am to 5.30pm (1630
to 0030 UTC) each day. More information about the ScienceCity event
is available at:
http://sciencecity.arizona.edu/

[ANS thanks Patrick WD6EWK for the above information]

+ Space Station 360: Zarya
Explore the Space Station’s first module with your mobile phone or
virtual-reality headset.

http://tinyurl.com/ANS073-SpaceStationTour

[ANS thanks the European Space Agency for the above information]

———————————————————————

/EX

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the
President’s Club. Members of the President’s Club, as sustaining
donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive addi-
tional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT
Office.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership
at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students
enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the stu-
dent rate for a maximum of 6 post-secondary years in this status.
Contact Martha at the AMSAT Office for additional student membership
information.

73,
This week’s ANS Editor,
EMike McCardel, AA8EM (Former KC8YLD)
kc8yld at amsat dot org

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE
ANS-066
The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and infor-
mation service of AMSAT North America, The Radio Amateur Satellite
Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in Space
including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur
Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building,
launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio
satellites.

The news feed on http://www.amsat.org publishes news of Amateur
Radio in Space as soon as our volunteers can post it.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to:
ans-editor at amsat.org.

In this edition:

* One Million Telemetry Packets Received by AO-85 Ground Network
* ARISS Countdown to 1000th Contact
* School SSTV CubeSat to deploy from ISS
* First satellite QSO to Antartica
* AMSAT’s Fox-1E Likely to Get a Lift from NASA
* AMSAT Events
* ARISS News
* Satellite Shorts From All Over

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-066.01
ANS-066 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 066.01
>From AMSAT HQ KENSINGTON, MD.
DATE March 06, 2016
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-066.01

———————————————————————

One Million Telemetry Packets Received by AO-85 Ground Network

At 10:31:06 UTC on March 3rd 2016, the millionth telemetry packet
from AO-85 was submitted by PB0AHX to AMSAT’s Fox Internet Telemetry
System (FITS). Led by Chris Thompson, G0KLA, AMSAT has built a
worldwide network of ground stations that can effectively monitor
spacecraft health as well as collect experiment data for our
university partners. The FITS development team is international in
nature, with contributors from the US, Canada and the UK. There is
plenty of work to go around, if you are interested in helping please
contact volunteer@amsat.org

[ANS thanks AMSAT/NA for the above information]

———————————————————————

ARISS Countdown to 1000th Contact

The ARISS contact between Powys Secondary Schools, Mid Wales, UK,
with Astronaut Timothy Peake KG5BVI was on Saturday represented the
997th successful ARISS contact in ARISS history. ARISS is posed to
celebrate its 1000th contact as early as this week.

Below is the list of currently scheduled events for ARISS. Each one
will have to be successful for the numbering to be correct. As of
right now, the March 10 contact with North Dakota (the first for that
state) is in the prime slot to be the 1000th contact.

School: Slovanské Gymnázium Olomouc, Olomouc, Moravia, Czech
Republic (Kopra) #998
Tue 2016-03-08 08:22:43 UTC 82 deg

School: Atlanta Science Festival, Atlanta, Georgia (Peake) #999
Tue 2016-03-08 16:11:05 UTC 53 deg via K6DUE

School: North Dakota Space Grant Consortium (NDSGC), Grand Forks,
North Dakota (Kopra) #1000
Thu 2016-03-10 19:08:55 UTC 56 deg via W6SRJ

As stated above, if all of the above contacts are successful it looks
as if the contact between Tim Kopra KE5UDN and North Dakota Space
Grant Consortium (NDSGC) in Grand Forks, North Dakota Thursday 2016-
03-10 19:08:55 UTC will be contact 1000. The contact will be
telebridged via W6SRJ. Kopra will use the callsign NA1SS.

In celebration of the 1000th contact NASA is producing videos
touting the importance of amateur radio on the ISS.
The first of these to be released can be viewed at

[ANS thanks ARISS for the above information]

———————————————————————

School SSTV CubeSat to deploy from ISS

A Slow Scan TV (SSTV) CubeSat developed by students at Saint Thomas
More Cathedral School (STM) in Arlington, VA, is set to be deployed
from the International Space Station on March 7 between 8-11am EST.

STM is thought to be the first Elementary school to build their own
satellite, even Pre-Kindergarten, Kindergarten, and First Grade
students were involved in the project.

The satellite, a 1U CubeSat called STMSat-1, will transmit a SSTV
signal on 437.800 MHz.

Middle School Students took the initiative to begin exploring how to
receive data from the CubeSat and formed a Ham Radio Club. There,
they learned the basics of operating a ham radio station and explored
Slow Scan Television as an option for receiving images once the
satellite is deployed.

How Did 400 Grade School Students Built A Nano-Satellite?

http://jewelbots.tumblr.com/post/134465599599/how-did-400-grade-school-students-built-a


school-students-built-a

STMSat-1
https://twitter.com/STMSAT11
https://www.facebook.com/stmsat1/
http://www.stmsat-1.org/

Be advised that the deployment could be delayed or postponed
depending on demands on the crew’s time

[ANS thanks AMSAT-UK* for the above information]

———————————————————————

First satellite QSO to Antartica

On Feb-28 2016, first satellite QSO from Antartica to mainland
Argentina thru SO-50. Photos & details (spanish) on

Histórico primer QSO desde la Antártida

[ANS thanks Pedro C0nverso for the above information]

———————————————————————

AMSAT’s Fox-1E Likely to Get a Lift from NASA

NASA has accepted the Fox-1E cubesat – a joint effort between AMSAT
and Vanderbilt University – to be part of its CubeSat Launch
Initiative (CSLI) program. The satellite, also known as RadFxSat-2,
will carry a radiation effects experiment developed by Vanderbilt as
well as a 30-kHz wide amateur radio linear transponder with an uplink
on 2 meters and a downlink on 70 centimeters. This will be in place
of the FM repeater carried by most amateur cubesats. The project
received a #1 priority out of 20 accepted proposals and has been
offered a launch date by NASA. This is the second collaboration
between AMSAT and Vanderbilt. The first – RadFxSat/Fox-1B – is also
part of NASA’s CSLI program and is scheduled for launch next January.

http://cqnewsroom.blogspot.com/2016/02/amsats-fox-1e-likely-to-get-
lift-from.html

[ANS thanks the CQ Newsroom for theabove information]

———————————————————————

AMSAT Events

Information about AMSAT activities at other important events around
the country. Examples of these events are radio club meetings where
AMSAT Area Coordinators give presentations, demonstrations of working
amateur satellites, and hamfests with an AMSAT presence (a table with
AMSAT literature and merchandise, sometimes also with presentations,
forums, and/or demonstrations).

*Saturday and Sunday, 12-13 March 2016 – ScienceCity science fair, on
the University of Arizona campus in Tucson AZ

*Friday/Saturday, 18-19 March 2016 – presentation for the BVARC
Houston Hamfest Fort Bend County Fairground demo on Saturday

*Saturday, 19 March 2016 – Scottsdale Amateur Radio Club Spring
Hamfest 2016 in Scottsdale AZ

*Saturday, 26 March 2016 – Tucson Spring Hamfest in Tucson AZ

*Friday through Sunday, 29 April-1 May 2016, ARRL Nevada State
Convention in Las Vegas NV

*Saturday, 7 May 2016 – Cochise Amateur Radio Association Hamfest in
Sierra Vista AZ

*Saturday, 14 May 2016 – Matanuska Amateur Radio Association Hamfest
in Wasilla AK

*Saturday, 4 June 2016 – White Mountain Hamfest in Show Low AZ

[ANS thanks AMSAT-NA for the above information]

———————————————————————

ARISS News

+ A Successful contact was made between Gesamtschule Leverkusen
Schlebusch, Leverkusen, Germany and Astronaut Timothy Peake KG5BV
using Callsign OR4ISS. The contact began 03-01 16:45 UTC and lasted
about nine and a half minutes. Contact was telebridged via VK5ZAI.
ARISS Mentor was AA4KN. This was the 995th ARISS contact.

+ A Successful contact was made between National Urban Alliance for
Effective Education (NUA), Syosset, New York and Astronaut Tim Kopra
KE5UDN using Callsign NA1SS. The contact began [YEAR, Month, Date
Time] UTC and lasted about nine and a half minutes. Contact
was[direct/telebridge] via K6DUE.
ARISS Mentor was KA3HDO. This was the 996th ARISS contact.

+ A Successful contact was made between Powys Secondary Schools, Mid
Wales, UK, and Astronaut Timothy Peake KG5BVI using Callsign GB1SS.
The contact began [YEAR, Month, Date Time] UTC and lasted about nine
and a half minutes. Contact was direct via GB4PCS.
ARISS Mentor was KA3HDO. This was the 997th ARISS contact.

Upcoming ARISS Contact Schedule

Slovanské Gymnázium Olomouc, Olomouc, Moravia, Czech Republic,
direct via OK2KYJ
The ISS callsign is presently scheduled to be OR4ISS
The scheduled astronaut is Timothy Peake KG5BVI
Contact is a go for: Tue 2016-03-08 08:22:43 UTC

Atlanta Science Festival, Atlanta, Georgia, telebridge via K6DUE
The ISS callsign is presently scheduled to be NA1SS
The scheduled astronaut is Tim Kopra KE5UDN
Contact is a go for: Tue 2016-03-08 16:11:05 UTC
Watch for live stream at http://atlantasciencefestival.org/ariss

North Dakota Space Grant Consortium (NDSGC), Grand Forks, North
Dakota, telebridge via W6SRJ
The ISS callsign is presently scheduled to be NA1SS
The scheduled astronaut is Tim Kopra KE5UDN
Contact is a go for: Thu 2016-03-10 19:08:55 UTC

ARISS is always glad to receive listener reports for the above
contacts. ARISS thanks everyone in advance for their assistance.
Feel free to send your reports to aj9n@amsat.org or aj9n@aol.com.

All ARISS contacts are made via the Ericsson radio unless otherwise
noted.

[ANS thanks ARISS, Charlie AJ9N and David AA4KN for the above
information]

Watch
http://www.ariss.org/upcoming-contacts.html
for information about upcoming contacts as they are scheduled.

[ANS thanks ARISS, and Charlie, AJ9N for the above information]

———————————————————————

Satellite Shorts From All Over

Russian Mayak Satellite Says Bright Enough to Rival Solar System
Visible Objects

Just something interesting that came across the wires this morning.
Russian crowd funded project, apparently testing a solar
sail/aerodynamic braking satellite:

Once Mayak begins its sun-synchronous orbit above the Earth, the
spacecraft will unfold a 16 square meter pyramid of reflectors that
will reflect the Sun’s rays, creating a man-made star visible from
Earth and bright enough to rival any other solar system.

http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Russian_Crowdfunded_Satellite_Set_t
o_Become_the_Night_Skys_Brightest_Star_999.html

[ANS thanks JoAnne, K9JKM for the above information]

———————————————————————

/EX

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the
President’s Club. Members of the President’s Club, as sustaining
donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive addi-
tional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT
Office.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership
at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students
enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the stu-
dent rate for a maximum of 6 post-secondary years in this status.
Contact Martha at the AMSAT Office for additional student membership
information.

73,
This week’s ANS Editor,
Joe Spier, K6WAO
k6wao at amsat dot org

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE
ANS-059

The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and infor-
mation service of AMSAT North America, The Radio Amateur Satellite
Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in Space
including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur
Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building,
launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio
satellites.

The news feed on http://www.amsat.org publishes news of Amateur
Radio in Space as soon as our volunteers can post it.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to:
ans-editor at amsat.org.

In this edition:

* eBay Donations for AMSAT
* Upcoming ARISS Contact Schedule
* Satellite DXCC Nearly 20 Years in the Making
* 2016 AMSAT Field Day
* Tyvak Nanosatellite Systems to Support Atlas V CubeSat Rideshare Initiative
* UK and Malta University Satellite Collaboration

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-059.01
ANS-059 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 059.01
From AMSAT HQ Kensington, MD.
February 28, 2016
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-059.01

eBay Donations for AMSAT

Are you an eBay seller? One item, ten items, or a full-time business you
can donate a percentage of your winning bid to AMSAT. To do so, do not
list your item with the basic listing tool, select advanced tools. eBay
will give you a warning message that it is for large volume sellers,
however this is where the eBay for Charity tool is found.

You can ‘select another nonprofit you love’ and search for either AMSAT
or Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation. Choose the percentage amount of
the sale you would like to donate to AMSAT and boom. When your item
sells and the winning bidder pays, eBay will deduct the percentage from
your take and forward it to AMSAT.

Sometimes we are getting rid of our old equipment, sometimes selling
something new. In any case, won’t you consider giving a piece of the pie
to a new satellite and choose AMSAT for your eBay for Charity.

[ANS thanks Bruce, KK5DO, for the above information]

———————————————————————

Upcoming ARISS Contact Schedule

Gesamtschule Leverkusen Schlebusch, Leverkusen, Germany, direct via DLØIL
The ISS callsign is presently scheduled to be OR4ISS
The scheduled astronaut is Timothy Peake KG5BVI
Contact is a go for: Mon 2016-02-29 12:05:58 UTC 78 deg

National Urban Alliance for Effective Education (NUA), Syosset, New York,
telebridge VK5ZAI
The ISS callsign is presently scheduled to be NA1SS
The scheduled astronaut is Tim Kopra KE5UDN
Contact is a go for: Tue 2016-03-01 16:45:18 UTC 53 deg

Powys Secondary Schools, Mid Wales, UK, direct via GB4PCS
The ISS callsign is presently scheduled to be GB1SS
The scheduled astronaut is Timothy Peake KG5BVI
Contact is a go for: Sat 2016-03-05 10:55:19 UTC 59 deg

************************************************************************

The next window to submit a proposal for an upcoming contact is now open.
The window is open from 2016-02-15 to 2016-04-15 and would be for contacts
between 2017-01-01 and 2017-06-30.

Check out the ARISS website http://www.ariss.org/ or the ARRL website
http://www.arrl.org/hosting-an-ariss-contact for full details.

[ANS thanks Charlie, AJ9N, for the above information]

———————————————————————

Satellite DXCC Nearly 20 Years in the Making

It took nearly 20 years, but AMSAT Vice President of Operations Drew
Glasbrenner, KO4MA, finally qualified for Satellite DXCC. Glasbrenner submitted
the requisite number of QSLs for checking at the Orlando HamCation February
12-14, and ARRL Media and Public Relations Manager Sean Kutzko, KX9X, verified
KO4MA’s achievement.

“It’s been a long process getting to satellite DXCC,” said Glasbrenner, who got
into satellite operating around 1993, and was only on RS-12 (Mode K) for a long
time. “This was the Russian satellite payload that used 15 meters up, and 10
meters down,” he explained.

His activity stagnated for a long time during and after his college years, but
in 1999 he got involved in working the LEO satellites, such as UO-14 and AO-27,
“then FO-20 and FO-29 for a little more distance, and then on the perigee passes
of AO-10, when it was still semi-usable,” he added.

“When AO-40 was launched into a high-Earth orbit, I dove into Mode U/S with
gusto,” Glasbrenner recounted. During the 3 years that AO-40 was active, he
spent many late nights and early mornings looking for the next new one.
“Eventually I was using a 3 foot solid dish with preamp and downconverter for
the Mode S downlink, and this is when some of my most exciting contacts came.”

Highlights included working VU2MKP at a few degrees of elevation to the east,
right after the satellite came up, and working KH2GR in the other direction,
“while the satellite was off-pointing and the spin fades were horrendous, and
timing each call during peaks.”

When AO-40 went silent, Glasbrenner said he was about a dozen short of DXCC, and
he realized that he’d have to be proactive to finish up with just LEO
satellites. Many of his new ones came from operators who went the extra mile to
operate from places like the Caribbean and Greenland.

“The absence of operational HEO satellites makes satellite DXCC nearly
impossible for newer operators,” he said, “but I’m confident that continued
membership and support of AMSAT by any operator interested in satellites will
result in the successful return to high orbit by one of the several
opportunities currently being pursued by the organization. Strike while the iron
is hot!”

Bernhard Dobler, DJ5MN, has been at the top of the DXCC-Satellite standings
since 2000, and has 274 entities confirmed.

{ANS thanks ARRL and Drew, KO4MA, for the above information]

———————————————————————

2016 AMSAT Field Day

It’s that time of year again; summer and Field Day! Each year the American
Radio Relay League (ARRL) sponsors Field Day as a “picnic, a campout, practice
for emergencies, an informal contest and, most of all, FUN!” The event takes
place during a 24-hour period on the fourth weekend of June. For 2016 the event
takes place during a 27-hour period from 1800 UTC on Saturday June 25, 2016
through 2100 UTC on Sunday June 26, 2016. Those who set up prior to 1800 UTC on
June 25 can operate only 24 hours. The Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation
(AMSAT) promotes its own version of Field Day for operation via the amateur
satellites, held concurrently with the ARRL event.

With the loss of AO-51, VO-52 and SO-67 this year it is going to be as
challenging as last year. A few new satellites are up there to take some of the
load. If you are considering ONLY the FM voice satellites like SO-50 for your
AMSAT Field Day focus. Don’t, unless you are simply hoping to make one contact
for the ARRL rules bonus points. The congestion on FM LEO satellites is always
so intense that we must continue to limit their use to one-QSO-per-FM-satellite.
This includes the International Space Station. You will be allowed one QSO if
the ISS is operating Voice. You will also be allowed one digital QSO with the
ISS or any other digital, non-store-and-forward, packet satellite (if
operational).

It was suggested during past field days that a control station be allowed to
coordinate contacts on the FM satellites. There is nothing in the rules that
would prohibit this. This is nothing more than a single station working multiple
QSO’s. If a station were to act as a control station and give QSO’s to every
other field day station, the control station would still only be allowed to turn
in one QSO per FM satellite while the other station would be able to submit one
QSO.

The format for the message exchange on the ISS or other digital packet satellite
is an unproto packet to the other station (3-way exchange required) with all the
same information as normally exchanged for ARRL Field Day,
e.g.:
W6NWG de KK5DO 2A STX
KK5DO de W6NWG QSL 5A SDG
W6NWG de KK5DO QSL

If you have worked the satellites on Field Day in recent years, you may have
noticed a lot of good contacts can be made on some of the less-populated, low-
earth-orbit satellites like FO-29, AO-7, or AO-73. During Field Day the
transponders come alive like 20 meters on a weekend. The good news is that the
transponders on these satellites will support multiple simultaneous contacts.
The bad news is that you can’t use FM, just low duty-cycle modes like SSB and
CW.

THE 2016 AMSAT FIELD DAY RULES

The AMSAT Field Day 2016 event is open to all Amateur Radio operators. Amateurs
are to use the exchange as specified in ARRL rules for Field Day. The AMSAT
competition is to encourage the use of all amateur satellites, both analog and
digital. Note that no points will be credited for any contacts beyond the ONE
allowed via each single-channel FM satellite. Operators are encouraged not to
make any extra contacts via theses satellites (Ex: SO-50). CW contacts and
digital contacts are worth three points as outlined below.

1. Analog Transponders

ARRL rules apply, except:

– Each phone, CW, and digital segment ON EACH SATELLITE TRANSPONDER is
considered to be a separate band.

– CW and digital (RTTY, PSK-31, etc.) contacts count THREE points each.

– Stations are limited to one (1) completed QSO on any single channel FM
satellite. If a satellite has multiple modes such as V/u and L/s modes both
turned on, one contact each is allowed. If the PBBS is on – see Pacsats below,
ISS (1 phone and 1 digital), Contacts with the ISS crew will count for one
contact if they are active. PCSat (I, II, etc.) (1 digital),

– The use of more than one transmitter at the same time on a single satellite
transponder is prohibited.

2. Digital Transponders

For the Pacsats (GO-32, etc.) or ‘Store and Forward’ hamsats, each satellite is
considered a separate band. Do not post “CQ” messages. Simply upload ONE
greeting message to each satellite and download as many greeting messages as
possible from each satellite. The subject of the uploaded file should be posted
as Field Day Greetings, addressed to ALL. The purpose of this portion of the
competition is to demonstrate digital satellite communications to other Field
Day participants and observers. Do not reply to the Field Day Greetings
addressed to ALL.

The following uploads and downloads count as three-point digital contacts.

(a) Upload of a satellite Field Day Greetings file (one per satellite).
(b) Download of Satellite Field Day Greetings files posted by other stations.
Downloads of non-Field Day files or messages not addressed to ALL are not to be
counted for the event. Save DIR listings and message files for later “proof of
contact.”

Please note AMSAT uploaded messages do not count for QSO points under the ARRL
rules.

Satellite digipeat QSO’s and APRS short-message contacts are worth three points
each, but must be complete verified two-way exchanges. Remember, only one
digipeat contact is allowed for the ISS and other satellites in this mode.

The use of terrestrial gateway stations or internet gateways (i.e. EchoLink,
IRLP, etc.) to uplink/downlink is not allowed.
Sample Satellite Field Day Greetings File:

Greetings from W5MSQ Field Day Satellite station near Katy, Texas, EL-29, with
20 participants, operating class 2A, in the AMSAT-Houston group with the Houston
Amateur Television Society and the Houston QRP club. All the best and 73!

Note that the message stated the call, name of the group, operating class, where
they were located (the grid square would be helpful) and how many operators were
in attendance.

3. Operating Class

Stations operating portable and using emergency power (as per ARRL Field Day
rules) are in a separate operating class from those at home connected to
commercial power. On the report form simply check off Emergency or Commercial
for the Power Source and be sure to specify your ARRL operating class (2A, 1C,
etc.).

AND FINALLY…

The Satellite Summary Sheet should be used for submission of the AMSAT Field Day
competition and be received by KK5DO (email or postal mail) by 11:59 P.M. CDT,
Monday, July 11, 2016. The preferred method for submitting your log is via e-
mail to kk5do@amsat.org or kk5do@arrl.net.

You may also use the postal service but give plenty of time for your results to
arrive by the submission date. Add photographs or other interesting information
that can be used in an article for the Journal.

You will receive an email back (within one or two days) from me when I receive
your email submission. If you do not receive a confirmation message, then I have
not received your submission. Try sending it again or send it to my other email
address.

If mailing your submission, the address is:

Bruce Paige, KK5DO
Director of Awards and Contests
PO Box 310
Alief, TX 77411-0310.

Certificates will be awarded to the first-place emergency power/portable station
at the AMSAT General Meeting and Space Symposium in the fall of 2016.
Certificates will also be awarded to the second and third place
portable/emergency operation in addition to the first-place home station running
on emergency power. A station submitting high, award-winning scores will be
requested to send in dupe sheets for analog contacts and message listings for
digital downloads.

You may have multiple rig difficulties, antenna failures, computer glitches,
generator disasters, tropical storms, and there may even be satellite problems,
but the goal is to test your ability to operate in an emergency situation. Try
different gear. Demonstrate satellite operations to hams that don’t even know
the HAMSATS exist. Test your equipment. Avoid making more than ONE contact via
the FM-only voice HAMSATS or the ISS, and enjoy the event!

Complete copies of the rules and recommended submission form can be found on the
AMSAT web site.

2016 PDF Field Day Rules
http://www.amsat.org/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/2016fd.pdf

2016 MS-Word Field Day Rules
http://www.amsat.org/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/2016fd.docx

[ANS thanks Bruce, KK5DO, for the above information]

———————————————————————

Tyvak Nanosatellite Systems to support Atlas V CubeSat Rideshare initiative

Tyvak is responsible for identifying, obtaining, and integrating CubeSat
customers on the ULA Atlas V launch vehicle system.

Tyvak Nanosatellite Systems has signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with
United Launch Alliance (ULA) to serve as the primary Auxiliary Payload Customer
on CubeSat Rideshare Initiative efforts through Dec. 31, 2019.

ULA’s CubeSat Rideshare Initiative enables rideshare opportunities on its Atlas
V launch vehicle and aims to tap into a growing market of small satellites with
applications in education, scientific research, U.S. Government and commercial
business. CubeSats are miniaturized satellites originally designed for use in
conjunction with university educational projects and quickly becoming a
dependable tool for advance missions. CubeSats are made of one or more units,
called U’s, measuring 10cm x 10cm x 10cm with a mass of 1.33 kilograms.

Under this MOU, Tyvak will provide low-cost access to space for both commercial
and U.S. Government CubeSat customers, as well as no-cost access to space for
Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) CubeSat customers for
rideshares on ULA’s Atlas V launch vehicles.

Tyvak is responsible for identifying, obtaining, and integrating CubeSat
customers on the ULA Atlas V launch vehicle system. In addition, as part of the
agreement with ULA, Tyvak will provide for no cost up to three STEM CubeSat
slots for each Atlas V 24U capacity launch opportunity for educational
customers.

“Tyvak is thrilled to have been selected for this opportunity with a world-class
launch Provider like ULA,” said Tyvak President and Chief Executive Officer
Anthony Previte. “This MOU brings key opportunities to Tyvak and to the entire
nanosatellite community.”

“As America’s ride to space, ULA is transforming rideshares so that customers
will now have predictable manifest slots for their payloads,” said Tory Bruno,
ULA president and CEO. “We are driving innovations like this program which will
make space more affordable and accessible for all manner and size of payload
customers.”

[ANS thanks SpaceDaily for the above information]

———————————————————————

UK and Malta University Satellite Collaboration

The UK’s University of Birmingham, the University of Malta, the Malta Amateur
Radio League (MARL) and the Italian Astrodynamics company, GAUSS Srl are
collaborating on a project to send a PocketQube satellite with an amateur radio
payload into space.

The Times of Malta newspaper reports:

The 5x5x5 cm device, referred to as a PocketQube pico-satellite, will be
launched in 2018 into a sun-synchronous low earth orbit (LEO) and will be used
to validate on-board equipment that will study the properties the Earth’s
ionosphere.

This project will pave the way for a swarm of eight such satellites that will
spread over a large geographical area and hence gain better coverage of
changeable ionospheric conditions which affect radio communications.

The collaboration has brought together two Maltese post graduate engineering
students – Darren Cachia in Malta and Jonathan Osairiis Camilleri (Ozzy), a
Ph.D. student at the University of Birmingham – who have joined efforts and are
developing the satellite platform and the scientific payload respectively.

The mission is expected to last about 18 months and will relay information back
to Earth that will be accessible to anyone owning a simple ham radio set.
Information will be made available in due course to allow schools and interested
individuals to participate using inexpensive equipment.

[ANS thanks AMSAT-UK for the above information]

/EX

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the
President’s Club. Members of the President’s Club, as sustaining
donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive addi-
tional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT
Office.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership
at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students
enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the stu-
dent rate for a maximum of 6 post-secondary years in this status.
Contact Martha at the AMSAT Office for additional student membership
information.

73,
This week’s ANS Editor,
Lee McLamb, KU4OS
ku4os at amsat dot org

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE SPECIAL BULLETIN
ANS-052.02

The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and infor-
mation service of AMSAT North America, The Radio Amateur Satellite
Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in Space
including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur
Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building,
launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio
satellites.

The news feed on http://www.amsat.org publishes news of Amateur
Radio in Space as soon as our volunteers can post it.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to:
ans-editor at amsat.org.

In this edition:

* RadFxSat-2 (Fox-1E) Selected for Participation in NASA’s CSLI

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-052.02
ANS-052 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 052.02
From AMSAT HQ KENSINGTON, MD.
DATE February 21, 2016
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-052.02

RadFxSat-2 (Fox-1E) Selected for Participation in NASA’s CSLI

On February 18, 2016 NASA announced the selection of RadFxSat-2, the Space
Radiation Effects CubeSat, for participation in NASA’s CubeSat Launch
Initiative. RadFxSat-2 (Fox-1E) is another partnership opportunity between
Vanderbilt University ISDE and AMSAT, similar to RadFxSat (Fox-1B) which is
scheduled to launch in January 2017. Vanderbilt University, with cooperation
from AMSAT, submitted the RadFxSat-2 CSLI proposal in November 2015.

Out of 21 proposals, NASA is recommending 20 for participation in the CSLI
opportunity. RadFxSat-2 is prioritized #1 out of the 20 selected and has
been offered an opportunity for a launch date. The opportunity is being
evaluated by Vanderbilt University and AMSAT to determine if it meets our
mission and orbital parameters.

RadFxSat-2 (Fox-1E) will carry a radiation effects experiment similar to
RadFxSat (Fox-1B) but will study new FinFET technology.

The Fox-1E spacecraft bus will be built on the Fox-1 series but will feature
a linear V/U (Mode J) transponder “upgrade” to replace the standard FM
repeater which Fox-1A through D have carried. The downlink will feature a
1200 bps BPSK telemetry channel to carry the Vanderbilt science in addition
to a 30 kHz wide transponder for amateur radio use.

Further details of the mission and timeline will be published as they become
available and are cleared for public release.

[ANS thanks AMSAT’s Fox Engineering Team for the above information]

/EX

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE
ANS-052
The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and infor-
mation service of AMSAT North America, The Radio Amateur Satellite
Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in Space
including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur
Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building,
launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio
satellites.

The news feed on http://www.amsat.org publishes news of Amateur
Radio in Space as soon as our volunteers can post it.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to:
ans-editor at amsat.org.

In this edition:

* AMSAT Seeks Volunteers to Support Phase 4 “Five and Dime” Ground Terminal
Effort
* JAMSAT Symposium 2016 in Tokyo on March 5 – 6
* Japanese Ham Radio Satellite Launched
* HORYU-4 2.4GHz Received
* New AO7 Distance Record
* ARISS Information Sessions
* AMSAT Events
* ARISS News
* Satellite Shorts From All Over

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-052.01
ANS-052 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 052.01
>From AMSAT HQ KENSINGTON, MD.
DATE February 21, 2016
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-052.01

———————————————————————

AMSAT Seeks Volunteers to Support Phase 4 “Five and Dime” Ground Terminal
Effort

Established less than 1 year ago, AMSAT’s all-volunteer Phase 4 Ground
Terminal team has made significant strides in developing an ensemble of
solutions to support the so-called “Five and Dime” (5 GHz and 10 GHz)
strategy AMSAT has embraced for microwave satellite projects. Prompting the
effort is the planned launch of a geosynchronous military satellite in the
2018 timeframe, which could play host to an Amateur Radio payload operating
on the two microwave band. The overarching project, which also includes a
complementary Phase 4 Space team, is exploring new territory and innovative
solutions, and it’s seeking volunteers from among the technically savvy within
the Amateur Radio community.

“We’re going to make it as awesome as possible,” Ground Station team lead
Michelle Thompson, W5NYV, told ARRL. The project not only would support the
Phase 4B geosynchronous launch but provide solutions for the Phase 3E
high-Earth orbit satellite, and receiver support for AMSAT’s entry into the
NASA Cube Quest Challenge, which would go to the moon.

Thompson said the compelling technical reason for using 5 GHz and 10 GHz is
the ability to use high-bandwidth modes on those bands. In addition, “the 5
and 10 GHz bands are popular elsewhere, and other projects are embracing this
band complement,” she noted. Another advantage would be to raise Amateur
Radio’s profile on the two bands and perhaps “shake things up” there for
terrestrial use. “The 5 and 10 GHz bands are a compromise that’s working
really, really well,” Thompson said.

The US Air Force will control the geosynchronous satellite. Virginia Tech,
Millennium Space Systems (MSS), FEMA, various clubs as well as AMSAT and ARRL
are partners in or are supporting the project. A formal memorandum of
understanding is pending.

Cognitive Radios
“We’re currently exploring the Amateur Radio implementation of a very advanced
and exciting open standard called DVB-S2X for the downlink,” Thompson
explained, noting it offers a variety of modulation and coding. Earth stations
will use their individual radios, transmitting a digital signal — probably
something called Offset QPSK (O-PSK) — directly to the satellite, with each
getting its own channel in a frequency division, multiple access (FDMA)
scheme. “This is an elegant way to design an efficient and advanced
communication system and allows technical volunteers to experiment with the
basics of cognitive radio — radio that can sense the environment and adapt to
take full advantage of the capabilities the hardware offers,” she said.

Groundsats and a “Big Honking SDR”
Phase 4 radios will be designed to work not just with the impending
geosynchronous satellite but through terrestrial microwave “Groundsats,”
which, Thompson said, “are essentially satellite simulators that let you test
and use the radio terrestrially.” Phase 4 radio designs also could be
configured to use modulation schemes that are better able to deal with
terrestrial multipath.

Amateur Radio Access Points (ARAPs) — essentially signal aggregators — would
allow legacy radios, FM hand-held transceivers, or emergency traffic providers
to use the satellite from any point where an ARAP can be deployed, packaging
the input for uplink to the satellite. Hams within ARAP range would be able to
use the Five and Dime terrestrial network just as if they were operating
through a satellite.

“The Groundsat, which is doing the same job as the satellite payload, has a
big honking SDR on it,” Thompson said. Groundsat equipment has arrived and is
in use in San Diego, North Texas, and at Virginia Tech, and Groundsat
development is under way at those sites. A fourth site would be at Morgan
State University in Maryland.

Doing It on the Cheap
“Five and Dime” also reflects the project’s economics. AMSAT Board Member and
Virginia Tech Research Professor Bob McGwier, N4HY, recently explained on the
AMSAT-BB that the Ground Team’s work is “an effort to design an inexpensive
ground terminal for amateurs that would cost tens of thousands of dollars
commercially, for as much under $1000 as we can get it.” In contrast to the
Space Team’s work, which, he said, is taking place “under the cloak of ITAR
(International Traffic in Arms Regulations),” the Ground Team’s SDR is
“completely open source, open specification” and “easily reprogrammed to do
many different kinds of missions just by changing the software.”

“We welcome any interested technical volunteers to apply to the technical
volunteer program at AMSAT and become part of the team,” Thompson said. To
volunteer for the Phase 4 Ground Team, provide your contact information on
AMSAT’s Engineering Team contact form. Thompson’s weekly “Phase4” engineering
updates are available via YouTube. Additional development documentation is
posted on GitHub.

[ANS thanks the ARRL and Michelle Thompson, W5NYV for the above information]

———————————————————————

JAMSAT Symposium 2016 in Tokyo on March 5 – 6

JAMSAT Symposium 2016 will be held on March 5th PM and 6th
AM in Tokyo at Conference Room 2(CR2) in Miraikan
(The National Museum of Emerging Science and Innovation).

Please see
http://www.miraikan.jst.go.jp/en/
for location and access details.

Day 1 is mainly for “JAS-1 30 Years Anniversary”.
Day 2 is mainly for technology development for satellites.
If you are interested in it, or want to join the dinner party,
please contact
madoguchi@jamsat.or.jp

Time Title Presenter Call Sign
March 5
14:30 – 14:35 “Welcome” Mikio Mouri JA3GEP
14:35 – 16:10 “JAS-1 30 Years Anniversary” Toshiyuki Kondou Eng. Mgr.,
JARL, JR1NVU
16:20 – 17:30 “Joy of Satellite Communications” Eiji Nakamura, JA1CPA
18:00 – 20:00 Dinner at Sky View Lounge (Restaurant)

March 6
9:30 – 10:00 “Report from AMSAT-DL”(by Skype) Peter Guelzow, DB2OS
10:10 – 10:40 “Report on EsHailSat-2/Phase-4A” AMSAT-Qatar Mohamed
bin Jabor Althani, A71EY
10:40 – 11:20 “Development of Phase-4 Ground Station” Akira Kaneko, JA1OGZ
11:30 – 12:10 “Development of JAMSAT Mode-J Transponder”, Kan Fukai, JH1CEP
12:10 – 12:50 “USB Mini Tuner” Hiroshi Matsumoto, JA1SYK
12:50 – 13:20 “New Regulation on Spurious Emission” Akira Kaneko, JA1OGZ

[ANS thanks Mikio Mouri, JA3GEP for the above information]

———————————————————————

Japanese Ham Radio Satellite Launched

Yasutaka Narusawa JR2XEA posted on the AMSAT-BB:
Feb. 17 17:45JST(08:45UTC), ChubuSat-2 and ChubuSat-3 has been launched on
the H-IIA F30 launch vehicle. After separation, both satellites start
transmitting beacon message. I hope you receive our message and report to
us, thank you.

https://www.frontier.phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp/en/chubusat/chubusat_satellite2.html
https://www.frontier.phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp/en/chubusat/chubusat_satellite3.html

Yasutaka Narusawa JR2XEA provides the following information on ChubuSat-2/3:

Nagoya University(NU) and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries(MHI) developed 50kg
microsatellite ChubuSat-2(NU) and ChubuSat-3(MHI). These satellites have
amateur VHF receiver and amateur UHF transmitter, and will be launched on Feb.
12 2016 from Tanegashima, Japan. Komaki Amateur SATCOM Club operates these
satellites from Komaki, Japan.

After the satellite separation, each satellite will transmit UHF CW beacon
message including battery voltage etc. which is very important information for
our initial and critical operation. So we are very happy if you receive the CW
beacon message and report to us email: chubusat2@frontier.phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp

In following web site, we show the information(frequency, format, TLE, etc.)
about ChubuSat-2 and ChubuSat-3. If we have your report, we will show your
report in this page.
https://www.frontier.phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp/en/chubusat/chubusat_satellite2.html

Both satellite will provide the message exchange service. After the on-orbit
checkout of the satellite(maybe one month after launch), you can use this
service, sending your message with VHF uplink, then your message is written to
the on-board memory. By sending inquiry message, anyone can read your message
with UHF downlink.

ChubuSat-2 Satellite
Uplink: 145.815 MHz FSK 1200bps
Downlink: 437.100 MHz GMSK 9600bps and CW

ChubuSat-3 Satellite
Uplink: 145.840 MHz FSK 1200bps
Downlink: 437.425 MHz GMSK 9600bps and CW

The uplink/downlink format will be uploaded in above web site.

Horyu-4 downlink 437.375 MHz & 2400.300 MHz 1k2 AFSK,9k6 GMSK, S_BPSK, CW
http://kitsat.ele.kyutech.ac.jp/horyu4WEB/horyu4.html
http://www.amsatuk.me.uk/iaru/finished_detail.php?serialnum=434
https://www.facebook.com/Horyu-4-Arc-Event-Generator-and-Investigation-
Satellite-780188535364868/

[ANS thanks Yasutaka Narusawa JR2XEA, and AMSAT-UK for the above information]

———————————————————————

HORYU-4 2.4GHz received

I heard 2.4GHz signal many times in this orbit. The spurious signal will
be heard lower than about 56kHz from the nominal frequency, it may sound
rather strongly. The followings are the image that I received this real
signal and spurious signal. At the 2400.244 MHz, I heard the clear and
stable sound of them. Perhaps it might not be a spurious signal.
This deviation signal might be the real signal of HORYU-4 2.4GHz.

05:22-05:34 UTC, 20 Feb 2016, Ele 40 WS-S-E, 2400.300MHz 100kbps BPSK
07:03-07:16 UTC, 20 Feb 2016, Ele 45 W-S-SE, 2400.244MHz 100kbps BPSK

http://www.dropbox.com/s/yg41q64m69dnitc/60220hr4.wav?dl=0
http://www.ne.jp/asahi/hamradio/je9pel/hor4ch23.htm#ghz
http://www.ne.jp/asahi/hamradio/je9pel/60220hr1.png
http://www.ne.jp/asahi/hamradio/je9pel/60220hr2.png
http://www.ne.jp/asahi/hamradio/je9pel/60220hr3.png
http://www.ne.jp/asahi/hamradio/je9pel/60220hr4.png

[ANS thanks Mineo Wakita, JE9PEL for the above information]

———————————————————————

New AO7 Distance Record

Satellite Friends and Colleagues,

I wanted to share with everyone that on February 10th, at 2009UTC I made
a scheduled contact with Eduardo, PY2RN, using AO-7 Mode B, from
‘Shinnal Mountain’ just west of Little Rock, Arkansas. My 10 digit grid
locator for the contact was EM34ST20SC, and Eduardo’s station is located
at GG66LW77JQ in Vinhedo/SP, Brazil. Using the
http://no.nonsense.ee/qth/map.html
website for reference, this equates to 8030.895 km which we believe to be
a new record for AO-7 Mode B. I’ve been extremely busy this past week, but
I had a few folks request that I share a little background behind the
contact, so here we go.

Back on January 24th, I was on an AO-7(B) pass looking for Gustavo,
PT9BM. While not a record distance, Gustavo’s QTH is just shy of 7500km
away from me, so I was up on my mountain, specifically in a spot with
great a great southeastern view of the Horizon. As the bird came into
view, while scanning the passband, I heard Eduardo, PY2RN, calling CQ. I
tried to answer him, but his signal disappeared quickly after that, and
I went ahead and had a great QSO with Gustavo, and didn’t think anything
else of it until later that night when I decided to look up the station
I had heard. To my astonishment, Eduardo was 8030km away, which was way
beyond the theoretical range AO-7, even with elevation assistance. I
promptly emailed Eduardo and we both agreed to try and make a contact,
even though the math said it shouldn’t be possible.

At this point the random luck that had let me hear Eduardo on the 24th
seemed to elude us. We attempted contacts on the 26th, 28th, and 30th
all to no avail. After recalculating windows, our next shot was on
February 8th. WinListen (from Sat32pc) calculated a 3 second window on
the 8th, followed by 5 seconds on the 10th. The day of the 8th came, and
we prepared for the attempt. Murphy once again seemed to haunt us
though, as we successfully heard the calls and grids of each other, but
strong CW QRM was hitting the bird so hard that the intelligibility was
low and, more importantly, neither of us had a camera running. We
decided to not count the QSO due to these reasons. The good news was
though, we both heard each other (the first time that had happened) and
our frequency coordination was spot on. We knew it could be done, we
just needed a little luck.

Finally, on February 10th, we got a bit of a break. We had already
determined that 5 seconds was simply not enough time to do a proper “QSL
thanks for the grid, have a great day” type of chat, so we both agreed
to simply repeat ‘your call / my call / grid / report’ rapidly, much in
the same way a digital or contest contact is made. At 2009UTC, both
stations cleanly heard the others call and grid, completing the
contact. It was extremely rapid, and very weak, but clear. Eduardo’s
side of the QSO turned out way better than mine did, and he has uploaded
a recording of it to YouTube here:

After all my work towards low-elevation contacts from mountain-tops, I
think this is approaching the limits of what can be done on AO-7. This
was by far the hardest sked I’ve ever attempted, and with the contact
window measured in mere seconds, it leaves absolutely no room for error.
Had I not heard Eduardo’s call at random on the attempt with Gustavo, I
doubt I would have even pursued this as something that was possible.
That said, wow.. what a rush

Big thanks to Eduardo, PY2RN, for humoring my obsession with making
ultra long-distance QSOs on the birds, and for sticking with it until we
finally made it work. Good DX my friend. Also thanks to Gustavo (PT9BM)
for persuading me to point my arrow to the South, and Drew (KO4MA) for
acting as a spotter during one of the passes to see just how far apart
we were from each other. Appreciate it guys.

If anyone has any questions or comments, I’m happy to field them. Until
then, catch you on the birds! 73!

Signed,
Dave, KG5CCI

Dave, KG5CCI also posted on the AMSAT-BB that he was using an “Alaskan” Arrow
( 4 elements on 2m, 10 elements on 70cm) held by hand, running 10′ pieces of
LMR-240 into an Icom 821h, manually tuned.
“Everything is run from a LiFePo4 battery, and I pretty much exclusively
operate portable mountain-top with unobstructed horizon views in the direction
I’m planning to work”, reported Dave.

Also on the AMSAT-BB Eduardo, PY2RN wrote that he used:
“RX: Funcube pro plus + SDR# V.1430 (with great NB capabilities) + Yagi-Uda
11el CP + Mirage KP-2 pre-amp.
TX: TS-2000x + Yagi-Uda 20el CP Tracked by Satellite Tracking embedded into
SDR-RADIO V2 software suite + GS-232/G-5400
Coax: RFS RGC213 15m long
And a clear view to my N/NW bound which allows to hear a little after sat LOS
most of times.
Put together again an old P3 sat setup sitting in storage for many years, just
added the SDR fun to it.”


http://www.arrl.org/news/arkansas-vhfer-claims-mathematically-impossible-ao-7-
mode-b-distance-record

KG5CCI & PY2RN New Distance Record on AO-7

[ANS thanks Dave, KG5CCI, Eduardo, PY2RN, the ARRL, and the AMSAT-BB
for the above information]

———————————————————————

ARISS Information Sessions

Host a Real-Time Conversation With Crew Members Aboard the International
Space Station

ARISS-US is now accepting proposals from U.S. schools, museums, science
centers and community youth organizations to host an Amateur Radio on the
International Space Station, or ARISS, contact between Jan. 1 – June 30,
2017. To maximize these radio contact opportunities, ARISS-US is looking for
organizations that will draw large numbers of participants and integrate the
contact into a well-developed education plan. Proposals are due April 15,
2016.

Using amateur radio, students can ask astronauts questions about life in
space and other space-related topics. Students fully engage in the ARISS
contact by helping set up an amateur radio ground station at the school and
then using that station to talk directly with a crew member on the
International Space Station for approximately 10 minutes. ARISS provides
experienced mentors and relies on local amateur radio volunteers to help
organizations obtain the technology required to host this once-in-a-lifetime
opportunity for students.

Informational Sessions
———————-

To help organizations in preparing their proposals, the ARISS program
coordinator will offer hourlong online information sessions. These are
designed to provide more information regarding U.S. ARISS contacts and the
proposal process, and offer an opportunity to ask questions. While attending
an online information session is not required, it is strongly encouraged.

Informational sessions will be offered Feb. 29, 2016, at 4 p.m. EST and
March 10, 2016, at 7 p.m. EST.

Advance registration is necessary. Email ARISS (ariss@arrl.org) to sign up
for an information session.

For proposal information and more details such as expectations, proposal
guidelines and proposal form, visit
http://www.arrl.org/hosting-an-ariss-contact.

ARISS-US is offered through a partnership between NASA; the American Radio
Relay League, or ARRL; and the Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation, or
AMSAT. ARISS was created and is managed by an international working group,
including several countries in Europe as well as Japan, Russia, Canada, and
the USA.

Questions about this opportunity should be emailed to ariss@arrl.org.

[ANS thanks the NASA Education Express Message — Feb. 18, 2016 for the
above information]

———————————————————————

AMSAT Events

Information about AMSAT activities at other important events around
the country. Examples of these events are radio club meetings where
AMSAT Area Coordinators give presentations, demonstrations of working
amateur satellites, and hamfests with an AMSAT presence (a table with
AMSAT literature and merchandise, sometimes also with presentations,
forums, and/or demonstrations).

*Friday, 4 March 2016 – presentation for the Associated Radio Amateurs
of Long Beach meeting in Signal Hill CA

*Saturday and Sunday, 12-13 March 2016 – ScienceCity science fair, on
the University of Arizona campus in Tucson AZ

*Saturday, 19 March 2016 – Scottsdale Amateur Radio Club Spring
Hamfest 2016 in Scottsdale AZ

*Saturday, 26 March 2016 – Tucson Spring Hamfest in Tucson AZ

*Friday through Sunday, 29 April-1 May 2016 – ARRL Nevada State
Convention in Las Vegas NV

*Saturday, 7 May 2016 – Cochise Amateur Radio Association Hamfest in
Sierra Vista AZ

*Saturday, 4 June 2016 – White Mountain Hamfest in Show Low AZ

[ANS thanks AMSAT-NA for the above information]

———————————————————————

ARISS News

Successful Contacts

Oasis Academy Brightstowe, Bristol, UK, direct via GB1OAB
The ISS callsign was scheduled to be GB1SS
The scheduled astronaut was Timothy Peake KG5BVI
Contact was successful: Fri 2016-02-19 14:23:23 UTC 78 deg

Tim answered on the second call and we proceeded to to get 19 complete
questions answered. Ham TV came in from Goonhilly and we had over four
and a half minutes lock from our mobile 1.2m dish mounted on a Land Rover.
Once we had video, I asked Tim to give us a wave, which he did with the
biggest grin I seen from him yet.
In the room for the contact, we had over 260i people present with somewhere
near 500+ in the hall next – numbers will be verified shortly.
In terms of media, we had BBC and ITV Bristol TV and radio
BBC and ITV for the West Country, TV BBC (National) The One Show – they have
recorded a piece that will feature in build ups all next week and the contact
will be featured on the show on Friday 26th February.

UAH Space Hardware Club, Huntsville, Alabama, direct via K4UAH
The ISS callsign was scheduled to be NA1SS
The scheduled astronaut was Tim Kopra KE5UDN
Contact was successful: Fri 2016-02-19 17:20:14 UTC 72 deg

UAH SHC was successful with 18 questions answered. Very noisy at start but
full quieting once beyond question 3. 73 round completed. All are very
excited and happy!

The Space Hardware Club at the University of Alabama in Huntsville is an
engineering club of students that builds balloon payloads, satellites and
rockets outside of their regular classes. The club has been working on this
contact for over a year. After deciding to focus on 8th grade students, we
reached out to Discovery Middle School, Westlawn Middle School, and the
Tennessee Valley Homeschool 4-H group – all from the northern Alabama area.
The students from Westlawn have been part of Project Lead The Way for 2 years
now and have been exposed to robotics, modeling, and 3d printing. The students
from the homeschool group all have a passion for STEM, a love of learning and
being challenged, and are bubbling with excitement for this opportunity of a
lifetime. There are two STEM II classes from Discovery Middle School that
routinely rise to the expectations of their accelerated STEM focused
curriculum. By the time of the contact, the students will have learned about
the ISS, the astronauts and some of the experiments aboard, and amateur radio.
All of the students and club members involved are passionate about this
opportunity, and thank you for your time.

Upcoming Contacts

Istituto Sobrero, Casale Monferrato, Italy, direct via IK1SLD
The ISS callsign is presently scheduled to be OR4ISS
The scheduled astronaut is Tim Kopra KE5UDN
Contact is a go for: Thu 2016-02-25 09:10:55 UTC 40 deg

Norwich Schools, Norwich/East Anglia, UK, direct via GB2CNS
The ISS callsign is presently scheduled to be GB1SS
The scheduled astronaut is Timothy Peake KG5BVI
Contact is a go for: Fri 2016-02-26 14:43:39 UTC 29 deg

Watch
http://www.ariss.org/upcoming-contacts.html
for information about upcoming contacts as they are scheduled.

[ANS thanks ARISS, and Charlie, AJ9N for the above information]

———————————————————————

Satellite Shorts From All Over

NASA Invites Public to Send Artwork to an Asteroid

NASA is calling all space enthusiasts to send their artistic endeavors on a
journey aboard NASA’s Origins, Spectral Interpretation, Resource
Identification, Security-Regolith Explorer (OSIRIS-REx) spacecraft. This will
be the first U.S. mission to collect a sample of an asteroid and return it to
Earth for study.

OSIRIS-REx is scheduled to launch in September and travel to the asteroid
Bennu. The #WeTheExplorers campaign invites the public to take part in this
mission by expressing, through art, how the mission’s spirit of exploration is
reflected in their own lives. Submitted works of art will be saved on a chip
on the spacecraft. The spacecraft already carries a chip with more than
442,000 names submitted through the 2014 “Messages to Bennu” campaign.

“The development of the spacecraft and instruments has been a hugely creative
process, where ultimately the canvas is the machined metal and composites
preparing for launch in September,” said Jason Dworkin, OSIRIS-REx project
scientist at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. “It is
fitting that this endeavor can inspire the public to express their creativity
to be carried by OSIRIS-REx into space.”

A submission may take the form of a sketch, photograph, graphic, poem, song,
short video or other creative or artistic expression that reflects what it
means to be an explorer. Submissions will be accepted via Twitter and
Instagram until March 20. For details on how to include your submission on
the mission to Bennu, go to:

http://www.asteroidmission.org/WeTheExplorers

“Space exploration is an inherently creative activity,” said Dante Lauretta,
principal investigator for OSIRIS-REx at the University of Arizona, Tucson.
“We are inviting the world to join us on this great adventure by placing their
art work on the OSIRIS-REx spacecraft, where it will stay in space for
millennia.”

The spacecraft will voyage to the near-Earth asteroid Bennu to collect a
sample of at least 60 grams (2.1 ounces) and return it to Earth for study.
Scientists expect Bennu may hold clues to the origin of the solar system and
the source of the water and organic molecules that may have made their way to
Earth.

Goddard provides overall mission management, systems engineering and safety
and mission assurance for OSIRIS-REx. The University of Arizona, Tucson leads
the science team and observation planning and processing. Lockheed Martin
Space Systems in Denver is building the spacecraft. OSIRIS-REx is the third
mission in NASA’s New Frontiers Program. NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center
in Huntsville, Alabama, manages New Frontiers for the agency’s Science Mission
Directorate in Washington.

For more information on OSIRIS-Rex, visit:
http://www.nasa.gov/osiris-rex

[ANS thanks NASA for the above information]

———————————————————————

/EX

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the
President’s Club. Members of the President’s Club, as sustaining
donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive addi-
tional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT
Office.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership
at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students
enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the stu-
dent rate for a maximum of 6 post-secondary years in this status.
Contact Martha at the AMSAT Office for additional student membership
information.

73,
This week’s ANS Editor,
Joe Spier, K6WAO
k6wao at amsat dot org

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE
ANS-045
The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and infor-
mation service of AMSAT North America, The Radio Amateur Satellite
Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in Space
including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur
Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building,
launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio
satellites.

The news feed on http://www.amsat.org publishes news of Amateur
Radio in Space as soon as our volunteers can post it.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to:
ans-editor at amsat.org.

In this edition:

* AMSAT-NA Office Closed on Monday February 15th for President’s Day Holiday
* W1AW/4 Orlando Hamcation Demo
* Japanese Ham Radio Satellite Launch Postponed
* Old Dominion University OPEN HOUSE for local Middle and High Schools
* Orlando Hamcation Satellite Demos Scheduled
* ARISS UK release full video of Tim Peake and RMS contact
* AMSAT Events
* ARISS News
* Satellite Shorts From All Over

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-045.01
ANS-045 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 045.01
>From AMSAT HQ KENSINGTON, MD.
DATE February 14, 2016
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-045.01

———————————————————————

AMSAT-NA Office Closed on Monday February 15th for President’s Day Holiday

The AMSAT Office will be closed on Monday, February 15th in observance of
Presidents’ Day.

[ANS thanks Martha for the above information]

———————————————————————

W1AW/4 Orlando Hamcation Demo

Thanks to everyone who called in to work K8YSE portable
at the Orlando Hamcation. We had a great time working
everyone on SO-50 and FO-29. The crowds were big and the
weather outside was sunny and warm

Although there was a lot of interest in seeing
our station, 9 year old Hope, KM4IPF operating
W1AW/4 on SO-50 definitely stole the show.

Before the pass I watched her pull the compass out
of a bag and tell her father where to point the antenna
at AOS and where it would finish up at LOS. She used
two HT’s for the operation. Dad held the antenna for
her as she made contact after contact. She had a crowd
around her and we had the IC910 set up about 40′ away
and our crowd was listening to her on our setup. Steve,
N9IP, was the antenna man at our station. Near the end of
the pass I called her on the 910H and got a confirmation
from W1AW/4! We had a signal path hundreds of miles long
but were only 40′ apart!

Rick WA4NVM provided a recording of the pass and it is up
on my website:
http://www.papays.com/sat/general.html

Frank K9CIS also sent in some recordings of our
FO-29 passes which I’ll put on the website later.
Anyone needing confirmation of a Hamcation contact with
K8YSE on LOTW, just send me the QSO details
and I’ll upload it. I can also do a QSL card on
request.

There is nothing like a good demo to generate interest
in satellites. Just set up a station and the crows
starts gathering. Thanks to everyone who helped
with the effort.

[ANS thanks John, K8YSE for the above information]

———————————————————————

Japanese Ham Radio Satellite Launch Postponed

ChubuSat-2, ChubuSat-3 and Horyu-4 were expected to launch on Friday,
February 12 into a 575 km, 31 degree inclination orbit. This launch has
been postponed due to bad weather at the launch site. A rescheduled launch
date and time has not yet been announced.

http://spaceflightnow.com/2016/02/11/launch-of-japanese-x-ray-observatory-
postponed/
https://twitter.com/JAXA_en?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw

Yasutaka Narusawa JR2XEA provides the following information on ChubuSat-2/3:

Nagoya University(NU) and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries(MHI) developed 50kg
microsatellite ChubuSat-2(NU) and ChubuSat-3(MHI). These satellites have
amateur VHF receiver and amateur UHF transmitter, and will be launched on Feb.
12 2016 from Tanegashima, Japan. Komaki Amateur SATCOM Club operates these
satellites from Komaki, Japan.

After the satellite separation, each satellite will transmit UHF CW beacon
message including battery voltage etc. which is very important information for
our initial and critical operation. So we are very happy if you receive the CW
beacon message and report to us email: chubusat2@frontier.phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp

In following web site, we show the information(frequency, format, TLE, etc.)
about ChubuSat-2 and ChubuSat-3. If we have your report, we will show your
report in this page.
https://www.frontier.phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp/en/chubusat/chubusat_satellite2.html

Both satellite will provide the message exchange service. After the on-orbit
checkout of the satellite(maybe one month after launch), you can use this
service, sending your message with VHF uplink, then your message is written to
the on-board memory. By sending inquiry message, anyone can read your message
with UHF downlink.

ChubuSat-2 Satellite
Uplink: 145.815 MHz FSK 1200bps
Downlink: 437.100 MHz GMSK 9600bps and CW

ChubuSat-3 Satellite
Uplink: 145.840 MHz FSK 1200bps
Downlink: 437.425 MHz GMSK 9600bps and CW

The uplink/downlink format will be uploaded in above web site.

Horyu-4 downlink 437.375 MHz & 2400.300 MHz 1k2 AFSK,9k6 GMSK, S_BPSK, CW
http://kitsat.ele.kyutech.ac.jp/horyu4WEB/horyu4.html
http://www.amsatuk.me.uk/iaru/finished_detail.php?serialnum=434
https://www.facebook.com/Horyu-4-Arc-Event-Generator-and-Investigation-
Satellite-780188535364868/

[ANS thanks Yasutaka Narusawa JR2XEA, and AMSAT-UK for the above information]

———————————————————————

Old Dominion University OPEN HOUSE for local Middle and High Schools

The Open House is a recruiting event for the ODU School of Engineering. It is
scheduled for February 19 & 20, 2016. Students from 40 Middle and High
Schools (400 – 600 students) throughout the Hampton Roads VA region will be
visiting the school to tour the labs and campus, meet the (current ODU)
students and faculty, and learn more about education and career opportunities
in engineering.

K4AMG will be supporting the event by conducting a mini field day event will
be on Friday, Feb 19 and by hosting lab stations on Saturday Feb 20th
featuring a 15 minute presentation of ham radio topics. The lab topics include:

An overview of amateur radio as a learning tool.
A (light) technical discussion about the science and engineering that
support radio communications.
A youth forum presented by several young radio amateurs
KJ4NFL – Emergency and Public Service Communications
WX4TVJ and AE4FH – Antennas
KJ4EYZ – Cultures and Environmental Considerations for DX-peditions
Satellite communications featuring the CUBESAT simulator provided by AMSAT-NA
–KW4CR.
Society of Broadcast Engineers – Richard Dyer speaking on Careers in Broadcast
Engineering and Electronics and Wireless Communications

At the student luncheon 9 year old Hope Lea, KM4IPF, will be the key note
speaker – subject OSCAR Satellite Communications

[ANS thanks Rich, WA8BUE for the above information]

———————————————————————

Orlando Hamcation Satellite Demos Scheduled

A demo station at Orlando Hamcation has been scheduled
on Friday, Saturday and possibly on Sunday, February
12, 13, and 14. Operations will likely be on SO-50 and
FO-29 on the following passes:

2-12 1813-1832utc FO-29
2-12 1826-1838utc SO-50

2-13 1719-1737utc FO-29
2-13 1851-1904utc SO-50
2-13 1903-1922itc FO-29

2-14 1737-1749utc SO-50
2-14 1808-1827utc FO-29

Sunday is iffy. We may be on other satellites
as well.

Please give us a call if you hear us and respond
with your grid square, city/state and name. This
will help the onlookers to have a better idea of
where you are.

[ANS thanks John, K8YSE for the above information]

———————————————————————

ARISS UK release full video of Tim Peake and RMS contact

This is the 77 minute video of the ARISS contact between Tim Peake GB1SS and
the Royal Masonic School for Girls Rickmansworth GB1RMS. The video starts with
the students of Cadogan House, the prep school for girls aged 4 to 11 at the
Royal Masonic School for Girls singing a number of songs that have been part
of their study into space. The video continues with the senior school
presenting an overview of the activities that they have been involved in as
part of their study and understanding of space. This section concludes with a
panel of experts from the UK space industry fielding questions from the
assembled audience. At approximately 33 minutes, Ciaran Morgan M0XTD from
ARISS, starts the ARISS program with an introduction of the team, their
roles and all the equipment that has been brought to the school to help
facilitate the contact.

The actual ARISS contact starts at approximately 53 minutes into the video.

After the contact has finished, the school’s Head Girl concludes the evening
with a short thank you speech and introduces the trainers who prepared some of
the girls for the Foundation Amateur Radio License.

http://amsat-uk.org/2016/02/12/ariss-uk-release-full-video-of-tim-peake-and-
rms-contact/

More history made at second amateur radio call
More history made at second amateur radio call

HamTV on the ISS
HamTV on the ISS

What is Amateur Radio?

What is Amateur Radio?

Find an UK amateur radio training course near you
https://thersgb.org/services/coursefinder/

A free booklet is available aimed at introducing newcomers to the hobby that
can also be used as a handy reference while getting started, see
http://rsgb.org/main/get-started-in-amateur-radio/alex-discovers-amateur-radio
-2/

[ANS thanks ARISS-UK and AMSAT-UK for the above information]

———————————————————————

AMSAT Events

Information about AMSAT activities at other important events around
the country. Examples of these events are radio club meetings where
AMSAT Area Coordinators give presentations, demonstrations of working
amateur satellites, and hamfests with an AMSAT presence (a table with
AMSAT literature and merchandise, sometimes also with presentations,
forums, and/or demonstrations).

*Friday and Saturday, 19-20 February 2016 – Yuma Hamfest and 2016 ARRL
Southwest Division Convention in Yuma AZ

*Friday, 4 March 2016 – presentation for the Associated Radio Amateurs
of Long Beach meeting in Signal Hill CA

*Saturday and Sunday, 12-13 March 2016 – ScienceCity science fair, on
the University of Arizona campus in Tucson AZ

*Saturday, 19 March 2016 – Scottsdale Amateur Radio Club Spring
Hamfest 2016 in Scottsdale AZ

*Saturday, 26 March 2016 – Tucson Spring Hamfest in Tucson AZ

*Friday through Sunday, 29 April-1 May 2016 – ARRL Nevada State
Convention in Las Vegas NV

*Saturday, 7 May 2016 – Cochise Amateur Radio Association Hamfest in
Sierra Vista AZ

*Saturday, 4 June 2016 – White Mountain Hamfest in Show Low AZ

[ANS thanks AMSAT-NA for the above information]

———————————————————————

ARISS News

Proposal Window for Scheduled Contacts in the US Opens February 15

The US partners of the Amateur Radio on the International Space Station
(ARISS) Program are seeking formal and informal educational institutions and
organizations in the US, individually or working together, to host an Amateur
Radio contact with a crew member on board the ISS. ARISS anticipates that the
contact would be held between January 1, 2017 and June 30, 2017.

http://www.arrl.org/files/file/ARISS/Proposal%20Window%20Announcement-
2_15_16.pdf

Application Window Open for ARISS Europe Region

Schools and Youth organizations in the ARISS-Europe Region (Europe, Africa and
Middle East) interested in setting up an ARISS radio contact with an astronaut
onboard the International Space Station are invited to submit an application
and an educational project. The application submission window will be open
February 1 to April 30, 2016, for space conversations that will tentatively be
scheduled in the period extending from February to June 2017.

http://www.ariss-eu.org/school-contacts

Successful Contacts

Royal Masonic School for Girls, Rickmansworth, UK, direct via GB1RMS
The ISS callsign was scheduled to be GB1SS
The scheduled astronaut was Timothy Peake KG5BVI
Contact was successful: Thu 2016-02-11 18:09:02 UTC 89 deg
Congratulations to the HamTV crew that showed the contact!
This was a successful use of HamTV with an ARISS contact.

Videos at:

The Royal Masonic School for Girls is an independent girl’s day and boarding
school in Rickmansworth, Hertfordshire, with an exceptional, unusual and
distinguished history. Founded in 1788 with the purpose of educating the
daughters of Freemasons who were unable to support their families, it is one
of the oldest girls’ schools in the country. We attract girls aged 4-18 from
across Hertfordshire, Buckinghamshire and North London and boarders from all
over the world. We also have a Pre School for boys and girls aged 2 to 4. Our
ethos is both aspirational and nurturing and our girls strive to be the very
best they can be, academically, morally and creatively. Our public examination
results are consistently impressive and each year around 90% of girls leave
RMS to take up places at University. Life at RMS is centered on much more than
“just” academic success and the School is well known for its exceptional
pastoral care, and the wealth of extra-curricular opportunities it offers –
including Astronomy as we are one of very few schools in the UK to have our
own planetarium and observatory!

Upcoming Contacts

Oasis Academy Brightstowe, Bristol, UK, direct via GB1OAB
The ISS callsign is presently scheduled to be GB1SS
The scheduled astronaut is Timothy Peake KG5BVI
Contact is a go for: Fri 2016-02-19 14:23:23 UTC 78 deg

UAH Space Hardware Club, Huntsville, Alabama, direct via K4UAH
The ISS callsign is presently scheduled to be NA1SS
The scheduled astronaut is Tim Kopra KE5UDN
Contact is a go for: Fri 2016-02-19 17:20:14 UTC 72 deg

The Space Hardware Club at the University of Alabama in Huntsville is an
engineering club of students that builds balloon payloads, satellites and
rockets outside of their regular classes. The club has been working on this
contact for over a year. After deciding to focus on 8th grade students, we
reached out to Discovery Middle School, Westlawn Middle School, and the
Tennessee Valley Homeschool 4-H group – all from the northern Alabama area.
The students from Westlawn have been part of Project Lead The Way for 2 years
now and have been exposed to robotics, modeling, and 3d printing. The students
from the homeschool group all have a passion for STEM, a love of learning and
being challenged, and are bubbling with excitement for this opportunity of a
lifetime. There are two STEM II classes from Discovery Middle School that
routinely rise to the expectations of their accelerated STEM focused
curriculum. By the time of the contact, the students will have learned about
the ISS, the astronauts and some of the experiments aboard, and amateur radio.
All of the students and club members involved are passionate about this
opportunity, and thank you for your time.

Watch
http://www.ariss.org/upcoming-contacts.html
for information about upcoming contacts as they are scheduled.

[ANS thanks ARISS, and Charlie, AJ9N for the above information]

———————————————————————

Satellite Shorts From All Over

Austin, Texas Students to Speak to Space Station Astronaut

Students from the Knowledge is Power Program (KIPP) charter schools in Austin,
Texas will have the opportunity to speak with a NASA astronaut currently
living and working on the International Space Station at 11:55 a.m. EST on
Tuesday, Feb. 16. The 20-minute, Earth-to-space call will air live on NASA
Television and the agency’s website. The contact is schedule via Skype.

[ANS thanks NASA News Service for the above information]

Help XE1AO get his satellite WAS award via LOTW!

Omar XE1AO, a long-time satellite operator in central Mexico, tweeted
yesterday that he is interested in making contact with stations in 7
states to finally have all 50 states confirmed via Logbook of the
World. The last 7 states he needs are:

Kansas
Maine
New Jersey
New York
Rhode Island
Washington
West Virginia

Omar is in grid DK89df, if that helps in making calculations on possible
passes that he can work. His e-mail address on QRZ is good, so you can
contact him directly if you are able to help him get his satellite WAS
award. He is also on Twitter as @XE1AO, but his Twitter feed is not open
to the public. He’s received a few suggestions to get a couple of these
states taken care of, so hopefully he can finally reach that goal.

[ANS thanks Patrick Stoddard, WD9EWK/VA7EWK, AMSAT Director for Field
Operations for the above information]

6D0F Special Call

David Maciel XE3DX will work the special prefix 6D0F, for the apostolic
journey of his holiness pope Francis to Mexico.

Times include:
Thursday 11 February 2016 18:00 UTC
Thursday, 18 February 2016 18:59 UTC

David will work from grid EK36, Chiapas, on only FM satellites SO-50 and
AO-85.

The QSL Manager is XE1LM.
Visit
https://www.qrz.com/lookup/6d0f/
http://www.qsl.net/xe3dx/

[ANS thanks David Maciel, XE3DX for the above information]

———————————————————————

/EX

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the
President’s Club. Members of the President’s Club, as sustaining
donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive addi-
tional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT
Office.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership
at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students
enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the stu-
dent rate for a maximum of 6 post-secondary years in this status.
Contact Martha at the AMSAT Office for additional student membership
information.

73,
This week’s ANS Editor,
Joe Spier, K6WAO
k6wao at amsat dot org

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE
ANS-038

The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and infor-
mation service of AMSAT North America, The Radio Amateur Satellite
Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in Space
including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur
Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building,
launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio
satellites.

The news feed on http://www.amsat.org publishes news of Amateur
Radio in Space as soon as our volunteers can post it.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to:
ans-editor at amsat.org.

In this edition:

* ChubuSat-2 and ChubuSat-3 Launch Information
* AMSAT Dayton Booth Volunteers Needed
* Dayton Thursday Dinner and Beverages at Tickets Pub and Eatery
* FoxTelem Version 1.03 Released
* AMSAT Partners With Ragnorak Industries Cubesat Challenge Team
* Announcement of the 8th European CubeSat Symposium, 7-9 Sept 2016 (London)
* 2016 NASA Academy

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-038.01
ANS-038 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 038.01
From AMSAT HQ Kensington, MD.
February 7, 2016
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-038.01

ChubuSat-2 and ChubuSat-3 Launch Information

Nagoya University(NU) and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries(MHI) developed 50kg
microsatellite ChubuSat-2(NU) and ChubuSat-3(MHI). These satellites have
amateur VHF receiver and amateur UHF transmitter, and will be launched on
Feb. 12 2016 from Tanegashima, Japan. Komaki Amateur SATCOM Club operates
these satellites from Komaki, Japan.

After the satellite separation, each satellite will transmit UHF CW beacon
message including battery voltage etc. which is very important information
for our initial and critical operation. So we are very happy if you receive
the CW beacon message and report to us
chubusat2@frontier.phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp

In following WEB site, we show the information(frequency, format, TLE, etc.)
about ChubuSat-2 and ChubuSat-3. If we have your report, we will show your
report in this page.

https://www.frontier.phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp/en/chubusat/chubusat_satellite2.html

Both satellite will provide the message exchange service. After the on-orbit
checkout of the satellite(maybe one month after launch), you can use this
service, sending your message with VHF uplink, then your message is written
to the on-board memory. By sending inquiry message, anyone can read your
message with UHF downlink.

ChubuSat-2 Satellite
Uplink: 145.815 MHz FSK 1200bps
Downlink: 437.100 MHz GMSK 9600bps

ChubuSat-3 Satellite
Uplink: 145.840 MHz FSK 1200bps
Downlink: 437.425 MHz GMSK 9600bps

The uplink/downlink format will be uploaded in above WEB site.

We hope you get interested in our satellites, receive beacon messages, and
enjoy the message exchange service.

Best regards,

Yasutaka Narusawa (JR2XEA)

[ANS thanks Yasutaka Narusawa, JR2XEA, and the KOMAKI Amateur SATCOM Club
for the above information]

———————————————————————

AMSAT Dayton Booth Volunteers Needed

Call for Volunteers for the AMSAT Booth at Dayton 2016

The 2016 Dayton Hamvention®, sponsored by the Dayton Amateur Radio Association
will be held this year on May 20-22. “Dayton” is the largest hamfest in the
United States, and AMSAT will be there again this year.

You can assist AMSAT by volunteering to help staff the booth. While there, you
will meet other AMSAT members, interact with the satellite designers, builders,
and operators, and enjoy all that Dayton has to offer.

People are needed to assist with the setup of the booth on Thursday, May 19 (A
few people to move the equipment from the storage area leaving the hotel at 9
am, most at the Arena from 11am to 4 pm), to staff the booth Friday (9 am to 6
pm), Saturday (9 am to 5 pm), and Sunday (9 am to 1 pm), and pack up on Sunday
(1 pm to 3 pm). If you are leaving late Sunday, or Monday morning, please
consider helping transport the display to the storage area on the south side of
Dayton. This is normally completed by 5 pm. Most people volunteer for one or
more 2 hour shifts in the booth.

Please send an e-mail to Steve Belter, N9IP if you are willing to help AMSAT at
the Hamvention. Please let Steve know as soon as possible if you¹re available to
assist.

If you missed the Hamvention the last few years, there were some changes in the
Ball Arena, and the AMSAT exhibit was part of that change. We now have a 3 X 3
booth arrangement, with the engineering and software display on one side of the
aisle, and the sale area on the opposite side. The booth numbers are now
444-446 and 433-435. We will be very near the old exhibit area, within sight of
the ARRL exhibit.

[ANS thanks Steve, N9IP, for the above information]

———————————————————————

Dayton Thursday Dinner and Beverages at Tickets Pub and Eatery

Thursday night, 1800-2000. The annual AMSAT “Dinner at Tickets” party will be
held Thursday, May 19, at 1800 EDT at the Tickets Pub & Eatery. Everyone is
invited regardless of whether or not they helped with setup or plan to work in
the booth.

You’ll find a great selection of Greek and American food and excellent company!
No program or speaker, just good conversation. Food can be ordered from the
menu; drinks (beer, wine, sodas and iced tea) are available at the bar. Come as
you are. Bring some friends and have a great time the night before Hamvention®.

Tickets Pub and Eatery,
7 W. Main St.
Fairborn, OH 45324
(937) 878-9022

[ANS thanks the AMSAT Office for the above information]

———————————————————————

FoxTelem Version 1.03 Released

This version of FoxTelem uses a new datafile format. While we store our
data on the server in an SQL database, we use a flat file database for FoxTelem.
A flat file format is nearly optimal for a program that mostly adds new data to
the end of a growing list. With that said, we need to be able to load sections
of the data into memory for efficient analysis. The new data file format allows
that. If you have been downloading data from the server for analysis, you will
see that this format is much faster.

One major change is the ability to automatically switch between low speed
and high speed. This will help unattended stations gather as much telemetry as
possible. The “auto” mode actually runs both decoders at the same time, so
make sure your computer has enough CPU power to cope.

Graphing has been updated to support better analysis of the spacecraft by
the AMSAT Operations team and amateur scientists everywhere.

This version also contains new features that will be required for
Fox-1Cliff and Fox-1D.

You can download it here:
http://amsat.us/FoxTelem/windows/foxtelem_1.03_windows.zip
http://amsat.us/FoxTelem/mac/FoxTelem_1.03_mac.zip
http://amsat.us/FoxTelem/linux/foxtelem_1.03_linux.tar.gz

[ANS thanks Chris, G0KLA, for the above information]

———————————————————————

AMSAT Partners With Ragnorak Industries Cubesat Challenge Team

AMSAT is participating in the Cube Quest Challenge as a partner with Ragnarok
Industries. Members of the AMSAT – ASCENT team are designing the communications
package which will be 5.6 GHz uplink and 10.5 GHz. downlink and will use digital
modulation. At the end of the mission, the 6U cubesat will be put into a stable
lunar orbit and AMSAT will be able to operate the satellite as a digital
regenerative transponder.

Many of the details are still in development and the ASCENT team is always
looking for U.S. citizen volunteers to help with the design, prototype and
testing. There is no guarantee Ragnarok’s submission will be accepted by NASA
but if it is, this could be an exciting mission for the amateur community that
allows amateurs to have an active role in collecting telemetry and range rate
data that is crucial to the mission and end up with a satellite that allows EME
type communications between relatively small (1-2meter) earth stations.

[ANS thanks Howie, AB2S, for the above information]

———————————————————————

Announcement of the 8th European CubeSat Symposium, 7-9 Sept 2016 (London)

Dear CubeSat Community,

This year the 8th European CubeSat Symposium will take place in the vibrant city
of London on September 7th-9th 2016. The Symposium, co-organized by the von
Karman Institute (Belgium) and the Knowledge Transfer Network (UK), will be
hosted in the premises of the historical buildings of the Imperial College
London. In particular the South Kensington Campus is located in the very heart
of London only few steps away from Kensington Palace and the Natural History
Museum.

We have tried to organize this Symposium giving importance to the most relevant
topics in the CubeSat world. From Technology Demonstrators and Scientific
Missions to the Future Technologies and the Space Exploration with CubeSats.

In detail, the Symposium is covering the following topics:
– Scientific Instruments/Sensors on CubeSats
– Technology Demonstration on CubeSats (e.g. formation flying, IODs)
– Micro-g Experiments on CubeSats
– Micropropulsion Subsystems
– Attitude Determination and Control Subsystem
– CubeSat Flight Experience and Lessons Learned
– CubeSat Networks and Constellations
– Telecommunications, Ground Stations and Ground Station Networks
– Orbital Dynamics (e.g. de-orbiting and debris mitigation)
– Launchers and Deployers for CubeSats
– Future Technologies on CubeSats
– Space Exploration Missions with CubeSat (i.e. beyond Earth orbit)

Renowned speakers from NASA, ESA and NanoRacks LLC will give an account of their
view of the past and future development of CubeSats.

If you are interested in contributing to this event, please submit your abstract
before May 31st 2016. Registrations and abstract submission will be opened from
March 1st 2016. For more information on the venue, registration, deadlines,
abstract guidelines, sponsorship and exhibitors, please visit the symposium
website www.cubesatsymposium.eu

As in the previous years the Symposium is open to the all CubeSat community
around the World, so please feel free to disseminate this information further.

See you there!
Best Regards
Davide Masutti on behalf the Organising Committee

[ANS thanks Davide Masutti for the above information]

———————————————————————

2016 NASA Academy

The 2016 NASA Academy is being offered at three locations: NASA’s Ames
Research Center in California, NASA’s Glenn Research Center in Ohio, and
NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Alabama. Applications are being
solicited for this 10-week summer experience for college students with
emphasis on immersive and integrated multidisciplinary exposure and
training. Activities include laboratory research, a group project, lectures,
meetings with experts and administrators, visits to NASA centers and
space-related industries, and technical presentations. Students learn how
NASA and its centers operate, gain experience in world-class laboratories,
and participate in leadership development and team-building activities.

Applicants must be U.S. citizens (including citizens of the U.S. territories
Puerto Rico, Guam, U.S. Virgin Islands and Northern Marianas) majoring in a
STEM discipline. The applicants must be undergraduate or graduate students
enrolled full-time in accredited universities and colleges in the U.S. and
its territories. Students may apply to any of the NASA Academy opportunities
by following these steps:

1. Log into the NASA One Stop Shopping Initiative, or OSSI, site at
https://intern.nasa.gov.
2. Register and set up an account.
3. Select the “Search Opportunities” tab at the top bar.
4. Select “NASA Center(s) of Interest” under “NASA Center/Facility.”
5. Enter “Academy” in the “Keywords” block at the bottom of the screen.
6. Click the “Search” button at the very bottom of screen; a list of Academy
Opportunities will then be displayed.
7. Click on the “View” icon in the first column under “Action” to read about
the Opportunity of interest, followed by comments on additional instructions
for completing the application, including two requested essays.

The deadline for receipt of NASA Academy application(s) and associated
documents is Feb. 16, 2016.

Please direct questions about NASA Academy to
NASA-Academy-Application@mail.nasa.gov.

[ANS thanks the NASA Education Express Message — Feb. 4, 2016 for the above
information]

/EX

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the
President’s Club. Members of the President’s Club, as sustaining
donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive addi-
tional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT
Office.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership
at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students
enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the stu-
dent rate for a maximum of 6 post-secondary years in this status.
Contact Martha at the AMSAT Office for additional student membership
information.

73,
This week’s ANS Editor,
Lee McLamb, KU4OS
ku4os at amsat dot org

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE
ANS-031

The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and infor-
mation service of AMSAT North America, The Radio Amateur Satellite
Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in Space
including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur
Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building,
launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio
satellites.

The news feed on http://www.amsat.org publishes news of Amateur
Radio in Space as soon as our volunteers can post it.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to:
ans-editor at amsat.org.

In this edition:

* Weekly engineering report for Phase 4 radio project from AMSAT
* Write About Satellites, Space and Radio!
* UFO Researcher To Launch CubeSat To Search For E.T. Close To Home
* Pair of Satellites ejected from ISS for In-Space Navigation Exercise
* LilacSat-2 FM Transponder
* 6W8CK on Satellite
* IARU Paper: APRS Harmonization and removal of OSCAR sub-band
* ISS Orbit Boosted Ahead of March Crew Swap – Check Your Elements
* ARISS News
* Satellite Shorts From All Over

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-031.01
ANS-031 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 031.01
From AMSAT HQ KENSINGTON, MD.
[MONTH DAY, YEAR]
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-031.01

Weekly engineering report for Phase 4 radio project from AMSAT

The Phase 4 Ground weekly report focuses on the current modulation
schemes. We’re looking at DVB-S2X to receive, and OQPSK to transmit.

Repository for documents and software can be found:
https://github.com/phase4ground

We have nearly 50 volunteers on the mailing list and activity across
the country. We’re working hard to make a wonderful radio for AMSAT
and terrestrial microwave, and we appreciate your support, feedback,
comments, and critique.

DVB-S2 stands for Digital Video Broadcasting – Satellite – Second
Generation. There is a recent extension to this standard, called DVB-
S2X, that has very low SNR capabilities and a lot of other goodies.
The geo project, ascent, and eventually the high earth orbit project,
are expected to transmit using DVB-S2X. This is the foundation of our
common air interface.

DVB-S2X specifies the modulation and coding for our received signal.
There are five major landmarks.
One, an input stream adapter. Input streams can be packetized or
continuous, from single or multiple sources. This is helpful!

Two, forward error correction. Our type is low density parity check
codes concatenated with BCH codes. What does this mean?

A concatenated code is one that combines two different coding
schemes. In coding theory, there’s a fundamental problem in that
finding a really great code that has very low probability of error
usually means that the block length has to go up, and the decoding is
more and more complex. When you use two codes together that each have
particular strengths, they balance each other out. You can get
exponentially decreasing error probabilities, but you only have to
pay a polynomially increasing cost in terms of code block length.
This may seem complicated, but just remember concatenation is codes
doing teamwork, and the standard that we’re using is bad ass.
Our inner low density parity check code can achieve extremely low
error rates near channel capacity. This means, it’s about as good as
you can get. The outer BCH codes are used to correct sporadic errors
made by the LDPC decoder, and to trick it out so that we don’t have
enormous block lengths and stuff like that.

Three, we have a wide range of code rates. The code rate is
expressed as a fraction. The top number is how many uncoded bits go
in. The bottom number is how many coded bits come out. We have four
constellations. This is the the type of transformation from bits to
symbols. We have great choices here, and DVB-S2X provides additional
choices.

Four, there is a variety of spectral shaping available to us in DVB-
S2. This is a really neat thing. You can change the pulse shape of a
transmitted waveform in order to make it better suited for the radio
environment it’s expecting to be traveling through. Usually this
means making it fit into a bandwidth better. You don’t get something
for nothing, though, so being too aggressive with the pulse shaping
shows up in other aspects. Our particular shaping is different levels
of raised-cosign filtering. DVB-S2X provides additional levels of
shaping.

Five, this standard lets us learn and develop with something very
much like cognitive radio. As you can see, there are a lot of choices
for coding and modulation. We can specify a fixed coding and
modulation. This is called CCM for constant coding and modulation. In
the past, people like us looked at a link, designed for the worst
case solution, and used coding and modulation that would cover almost
all the bases. DVB-S2 has CCM, but it also specifies something called
variable coding and modulation, or VCM. The coding and modulation can
be changed on a frame-by-frame basis in response to different station
types or changes in the channel. In addition to that, there is
something called adaptive coding and modulation, or ACM, where
modulation and coding automagically adapts. This can happen on a
frame by frame basis.

DVB-S2 has things called annexes. In annex M, there’s a
specification for something we’ve already talked about wanting to do.
We want to map the transmitted services or station streams into time
slices and then recover information without having to demodulate the
entire signal.

DVB-S2 follows the usual flow of having input data coded up to
remove unnecessary redundancy, which is called source coding, and
then it is put into one of two different stream types. Because DVB-S2
is designed for MPEG streams, it has a lot of mechanisms for MPEG
data types, and I believe that this is the transport stream path in
the drawing. We aren’t going to use MPEG, so we fall into the generic
stream category.

The functional blocks of DVB-S2 include these things in trapezoids.
Mode adaptation, which starts to build up the data frames by
constructing the right header to go with the data. Stream adaptation,
which adds in the right amount of padding and scrambling. Forward
error correction, which produces coded frames that are of one of two
sizes. Mapping to constellations, which is the modulation. Finally,
there is physical layer framing. An open question is how minimal of a
station can be supported? Driving it down as low as possible is going
to be fun and challenging.

What we are anticipating is that the space teams will obtain an
implementation of a DVB-S2X transmitter. Talks are already underway
for this. Phase 4 ground is going to engineer the various DVB-S2X
receivers. Standards documents are already in the repository and work
is beginning. Get off the bench and hit the books!

So let’s talk a bit about some changes in the uplink for phase 4
radios. We were MSK, or minimum shift keying, but we are now OQPSK,
or offset quadrature phase shift keying. That is what the payload
team is currently designing for.

Like MSK, Offset QPSK has no more than a 90 degree phase shift at a
time. This is good. In order to create this, you begin with a QPSK
signal, where you take two data bits at a time. These two binary data
bits make four distinct values. Each of these values are mapped onto
four transmit phase shifts.

For offset QPSK, the odd and even bits coming into the modulator
have a timing offset, of one bit period. Hence the name. That means
the in-phase and quadrature signals, the I and the Q, never change at
the same time.

The power spectral density of QPSK and Offset QPSK is the same. The
shift in time doesn’t effect that.

Uplink experiments are beginning. We started putting together Team
HackRF, which will investigate the use of HackRF SDRs as one of the
phase 4 radio recipes. Lots of other experiments to work out other
recipes for amateurs to experiment need to happen too. If you have a
set of hardware and you want to work in parallel, then speak up. The
USRPs will get into the act ASAP, some people have BladeRFs, and so
on.

Review the weekly report at

[ANS thanks Michelle W5NYV for the above information]

———————————————————————

Write About Satellites, Space and Radio!

The AMSAT Journal is seeking interesting articles about amateur
radio satellites, space and radio – topics that feed the passion of
AMSAT members. Whether the focus is working the birds, new products,
building a new piece of equipment or an entire station, writing
software, training or doing demos, or anything else related to
amateur radio in space, please consider sharing your experience and
expertise with other AMSAT members by writing for the Journal.

Desired article length (rough guidelines):
Short articles – 800-1400 words
Longer articles – 2000-2500 words

Find out more about writer’s guidelines here. Photos, diagrams or
other images always help illustrate your points or projects.

If you are interested in seeing your byline in The AMSAT Journal and
sharing what you’ve learned with other members, email us at
journal@amsat.org.

[ANS thanks Joseph KB6IGK for the above information]

———————————————————————

UFO Researcher To Launch CubeSat To Search For E.T. Close To Home

An engineer turned UFO researcher is hoping to launch a low-earth
orbit CubeSat to search for evidence of extraterrestrial life.
Canadian Dave Cote has assembled a seven-person team to design, fund,
build and launch the project that he hopes will provide some answers
about the origins of recent unidentified object sightings across the
globe.

“We have had astronauts, military personnel, police officers and the
former Defence Minister of Canada come forward stating that
extraterrestrial UFOs are real, and that we are being visited,” says
Cote. “How can this be ignored and brushed off as nonsense?”
Concerned that the public isn’t getting straight answers, the group
has turned to crowdsourcing the project on Kickstarter.

Measuring roughly the size of a shoebox, CubeSats can pack a lot of
science equipment into a small space. They have also made satellite
deployment much more affordable, in some cases costing less than the
price of a lower-end automobile. Sites like CubeSatShop.com have
taken much of the complexity out of ordering needed components.

Cote says they’re a “go for launch” already but are looking for more
funding so they can pack it with as much science equipment as
possible. They aim to include image, infrared, electromagnetic, and
radiation sensors. This would give them the capability of not only
verifying visual data, but also correlating it with other events such
as electromagnetic and radioactive fluctuations.

The team plans to measure ionized radiation with a scintillation
counter and two cameras will capture a near 360-degree view around
the CubeSat. They plan to remove the infrared filters on the cameras
to cover more of the visual range.

Cote hopes to use amateur radio frequencies to transmit the data
back to earth and a worldwide network of ham volunteers to receive it.

“We are planning to use the ham frequencies to send data down from
the CubeSat to earth in hex or datafax protocol,” says Cote. “From
what we understand, we should be able to send a 100kB packet every
few minutes and this will enable us to send image thumbnails from
space, along with some basic EM data.”

While the details of the transmissions have yet to be determined,
Cote hopes to assemble a worldwide team of hams willing to receive
and log whatever data the satellite captures.

“We need help from the ham community, in capturing the data and
relaying it to our site,” he says. “There will be a 15-minute window
for download from the CubeSat, and then another volunteer would be
needed for the next 15-minute time window.”

Cote is cautiously optimistic that the satellite will provide
corroboration of UFO reports from eyewitnesses on Earth. But even if
the satellite doesn’t capture evidence of faraway visitors, he’s
hopeful that it will record interesting natural phenomenon like
meteors and solar flares.

“We can only hope that those who would like to know the truth will
step forward and help,” he says.

To learn more about the project or to volunteer, visit their
KickStarter page.

[ANS thanks Matt W1MST and AmateurRadio.com for the above information]

———————————————————————

Pair of Satellites ejected from ISS for In-Space Navigation Exercise

A package of two satellites was ejected from the International Space
Station on Friday to begin a mission dedicated to a demonstration of
autonomous navigation, rendezvous and docking technology. The second
LONESTAR mission is comprised of two satellites built by two American
Universities to undertake a demonstration of communication cross
links, data exchange, GPS-based navigation, relative navigation,
stationkeeping and data transmission to the ground.

LONESTAR stands for “Low Earth Orbiting Navigation Experiment for
Spacecraft Testing Autonomous Rendezvous and Docking” and includes
four missions flown over a period of years in a cost-effective
technology development program with the goal of mastering autonomous
rendezvous and docking. The second LONESTAR mission consists of the
AggieSat4 satellite built at Texas A&M and BEVO-2 built by students
at the University of Texas. The smaller BEVO-2 satellite is
facilitated within a deployer on the AggieSat4 spacecraft to be
released once the two have flown well clear of the International
Space Station.

The two satellites, already packaged, were sent to the Space Station
aboard the Cygnus OA-4 mission. Launching satellites to ISS for
deployment has the advantage of allowing the satellites to be
launched well-packaged to avoid damage and providing the opportunity
of an inspection in space to check for any damage encountered during
launch before committing them to flight.

Given the size of the AggieSat4 satellite, the deployment conducted
on Friday made use of the SSIKLOPS deployment mechanism, going by the
full name “Space Station Integrated Kinetic Launcher for Orbital
Payload Systems.” SSIKLOPS can be used to deploy larger satellites of
different shapes up to a mass of 110 Kilograms. It is a flat
structure that includes grapple fixtures for the robotic arms of the
Space Station and a single grapple fixture for the satellite that is
to be deployed. The fixture includes clamps and springs for the
deployment of the satellite. Overall, the structure is 127 by 61 by
7.6 centimeters in size. It also includes interfaces for the slide
table of the JEM Airlock.

SSIKLOPS first saw action in 2014 when deploying the SpinSat
spacecraft and spent most of its time in storage aboard ISS, awaiting
the deployment of future satellites. Final preparations for Friday’s
deployment were made on Wednesday when ISS Astronauts Scott Kelly and
Tim Peake installed the SSIKLOPS deployer on the Slide Table of the
Kibo module’s airlock followed by the installation of the Small Fine
Arm (SFA) Plate on the deployer and the attachment of the LONESTAR
satellite package. The slide table was then retracted and the airlock
sealed off for depressurization on Thursday.

The outer hatch of the airlock was opened and a careful ground-
controlled operation started to retrieve the SSIKLOPS deployer and
hand it from the Small Fine Arm to the Japanese Robotic Arm that was
then positioned for the deployment to ensure the satellite departed
to the correct direction, ruling out any possibility of re-contact
with ISS on subsequent orbits. Release was triggered just before
16:00 UTC on Friday and the LONESTAR package slowly floated away from
ISS, embarking on its mission that will last as long as the
satellites can remain in orbit, typically between six and twelve
months.

Drifting away from the Space Station, LONESTAR showed slight body
rates on all three axes as it slowly faded into the distance. The
Mission Team confirmed they were happy with the observed body rates
and declared the deployment a success. Congratulations were exchanged
between the different teams involved in the deployment – NASA’s
Mission Control, the JAXA Control Center in Japan, Payload
Controllers in Huntsville and the payload’s operators in Texas.

The spacecraft was programmed to power-up automatically ten minutes
after release, perform a health check and start transmitting
telemetry. Acquisition of signal was expected later on Friday to
begin a multi-day checkout campaign ahead of the satellite conducting
its de-tumble maneuver to enter a three-axis stabilized attitude
setting up for the deployment of BEVO-2.

The AggieSat4 satellite, developed and manufactured at Texas A&M
University, has a mass of approximately 55 Kilograms and measures 75
x 75 x 35 centimeters in size. The satellite hosts body-mounted solar
panels for power generation and is equipped with a three-axis
attitude determination and control system with an actuation accuracy
of two degrees, making use of reaction wheels and magnetic torquers.
The Electrical Power System hosts two battery packs delivering an
operational voltage of 34 V and a capacity of 95 Watt-hours.

AggieSat4 hosts two low-data-rate (LDR) radios, a high-data-rate
(HDR) radio, a crosslink radio for short-range communication with the
Bevo-2 satellite, and a DRAGON GPS Payload.

AggieSat4 will be tasked with completing a number of mission
objectives: demonstrating three-axis stabilization, the collection of
GPS data, recording video of the release of BEVO-2 with a 2MP camera,
computing and crosslinking relative navigation data based on relative
GPS measurements and tracking BEVO-2 based on these navigation
solutions.

The 4.2-Kilogram BEVO-2 satellite uses the 3U CubeSat Form Factor,
10 x 10 x 34 centimeters, employing an ISIPOD for deployment from
AggieSat4. The satellite features 24 solar cells installed on its
external panels to deliver power to 6 batteries operating at a
voltage of 7.4 V.

BEVO-2 has four deployable radio antennas and GPS patch antennas.
Attitude determination is accomplished with gyroscopes,
magnetometers, a star tracker and sun sensor while attitude actuation
employs reaction wheels and magnetic torquers. To connect with
AggieSat4 for the exchange of navigation data, the spacecraft hosts a
crosslink radio unit while communications with the ground make use of
a UHF/VHF terminal for data downlink and command uplink.

The satellite is outfitted with a cold gas thruster module holding
90 grams of Dupont R-236fa refrigerant stored at pressure to be
released for maneuvers of the satellite for stationkeeping and
rendezvous exercises with AggieSat4.

As the second of four LONESTAR missions, AggieSat4 and BEVO-2 build
on the success of the previous mission in 2009 as part of a program
outlined to make successive progress towards the ultimate goal of
achieving an autonomous rendezvous and docking of two satellites. The
autonomy aspect of LONESTAR is of particular importance for future
missions to distant targets where communication delays require
spacecraft to act autonomously.

[ANS thanks spaceflight101.com for the above information]

———————————————————————

LilacSat-2 FM Transponder

Paul Stoetzer reports:
“I have noticed that LilacSat-2’s FM transponder has been on nearly
continuously for the past four days They may be keeping it active
continuously during the holiday period in China.

It’s worth checking out if you haven’t worked it yet. It’s got a
good signal and can be easier to track than SO-50 because the carrier
stays active for a period when not receiving signals. The downlink
antenna also uses circular polarization, so there is less fading when
using linear antennas than on SO-50.

Uplink: 144.350 MHz FM (No PL)
Downlink: 437.200 MHz FM

Keep in mind that this uplink frequency is not within the normal
145.800 – 146.000 MHz satellite subband on two meters, though this
frequency is within the 144.300 – 144.500 MHz “New OSCAR subband” in
the ARRL band plan and is allocated to the Amateur Satellite Service
(as is the entirety of 144 – 146 MHz). On passes over the United
States, quite a few packet signals can be heard through the
transponder.

If you use LoTW, the satellite name to use when uploading QSOs is
‘CAS-3H.’

[ANS thanks Paul N8HM for the above information]

———————————————————————

6W8CK on Satellite

Conrad, 6W8CK, will be active on satellites from IK14 near Mbour,
Senegal until mid-February. He does not wish to publish his private
email, but is interested in skeds with North American stations who are
in range. If you are interested in setting up a sked, please look up
your mutual windows and email me. I will contact Conrad with a list of
operators and mutual windows.

He will try to be active on CW near 145.930 on AO-7 and 435.830 on
FO-29 during the afternoons, but may also be available on late night /
early morning passes for skeds.

Conrad is using a Yaesu FT-736R and an Elk antenna mounted up 5 meter
above ground. He does occasionally lose power, so keep this in mind if
you do not hear him on a particular pass.

QSL only via the DARC bureau to his home call, DF7OL. He may also
return to Senegal from November 2016 – February 2017.

[ANS thanks Paul, N8HM for the above information]

———————————————————————

IARU Paper: APRS Harmonization and removal of OSCAR sub-band

IARU Region 1 has released the papers for the Interim Meeting to be
held in Vienna April 15-17, 2016.

Among the papers for the C5 VHF/UHF/Microwave Committee is one on
harmonizing APRS.

VIE16_C5_41_1.pdf – 144 /435 MHz APRS Harmonisation

The paper covers global band planning considerations and among the
recommendations says:

Emphasise that spaceborne APRS must be confined to globally
coordinated amateur satellite sub bands. Therefore items that are
ambiguous and generate confusion in national band plans such as
‘Space communications’ and ‘New Oscar Sub band’ should be removed as
soon as possible in all Regions in accordance with IARU-AC and
Satellite Coordination guidance

It is believed that ‘New Oscar Sub band’ refers to the USA’s ARRL
144 MHz band plan and ‘Space communications’ to the Australian WIA
144 MHz band plan. These band plans, as well as those for some other
countries, show 144.300 – 144.500 MHz as being for Amateur Satellite
use.

Direct link for C5 VHF/UHF/Microwave Papers
http://tinyurl.com/ANS031-Microwave

Links for all committee papers and email addresses of Committee
Chairs are at
http://tinyurl.com/ANS031-IARU

ARRL 144 MHz Band Plan http://www.arrl.org/band-plan

WIA 144 MHz Band Plan http://tinyurl.com/ANS031-APRS

[ANS thanks AMSAT-UK for the above information]

———————————————————————

ISS Orbit Boosted Ahead of March Crew Swap – Check Your Elements

The International Space Station raised its orbit Wednesday afternoon
before a pair of crews swap places and a cargo ship arrives in March.
One-year crew members Scott Kelly of NASA and Mikhail Kornienko of
Roscosmos are set to return home March 1 along with Russian cosmonaut
Sergey Volkov. Then, Expedition 47 will begin and three new crew
members will arrive March 19. New supplies are scheduled to be
delivered to the crew March 31 aboard a Progress 63 cargo craft.

The orbiting Expedition 46 crew was back at work Tuesday on a series
of life science and physics experiments to benefit life on Earth and
crews living in space. Commander Scott Kelly explored maximizing the
effects of exercise in space while British astronaut Tim Peake
studied how living in space affects using touch-based technologies,
repairing sensitive equipment and a variety of other tasks. NASA
astronaut Tim Kopra researched how materials burn in space.

Two cosmonauts resized their Russian Orlan spacesuits today, checked
them for leaks and set up hardware before next week’s maintenance
spacewalk. Flight Engineers Sergey Volkov and Yuri Malenchenko will
work outside Feb. 3 in their Orlan suits to install hardware and
science experiments on the orbital lab’s Russian segment.

[ANS thanks blogs.nasa,gov for the above information]

———————————————————————

ARISS News

+ A Successful contact was made between Brihaspati Vidyasadan,
Kathmandu, Nepal and Astronaut Timothy Peake KG5BVI using Callsign
NA1SS. The contact began 2016-01-20 08:37 UTC and lasted about nine
and a half minutes. Contact was telebridge via VK5ZAI. ARISS Mentor
was 7M3TJZ. This event represents the 984th ARISS contact. A YouTube
video of the evnt can be seen here

Upcoming ARISS Contact Schedule as of 2016-01-27

Christ The King School, Rutland, Vermont, telebridge via VK4KHZ)
The ISS callsign is presently scheduled to be NA1SS. The scheduled
astronaut is Tim Kopra KE5UDN
Contact is a go for: Thu 2016-02-04 18:28:16 UTC

“Gesmundo Moro Fiore” Secondary School, Terlizzi, Italy, telebridge
via LU1CGB. The ISS callsign is presently scheduled to be NA1SS. The
scheduled astronaut is Timothy Peake KG5BVI.
Contact is a go for: Sat 2016-02-06 09:09:01 UTC

[ANS thanks ARISS, Charlie AJ9N and David AA4KN for the above
information]

———————————————————————

Satellite Shorts From All Over

+ Congrats to Steve Kristoff, AI9IN, for having worked 5 hams in the
EM55 grid.
To earn 5 in EM55 award #59, please check out
http://www.starcommgroup.org for the awards offered.

[ANS thanks Damon Runion, WA4HFN, for the above information]

+ The Colorado Amateur Satellite Net is held 7PM mountain time on
Thursdays 6PM Pacific. 7PM Mountain, 8PM Central, 9PM Eastern

For more information visit http://www.amsatnet.info/

[ANS thanks Skyler KD0WHB for the above information]

+ The Jan/Feb issue of The AMSAT Journal is off to the printer.

[ANS thanks Joseph KB6IGK for the above information]

———————————————————————

/EX

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the
President’s Club. Members of the President’s Club, as sustaining
donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive addi-
tional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT
Office.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership
at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students
enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the stu-
dent rate for a maximum of 6 post-secondary years in this status.
Contact Martha at the AMSAT Office for additional student membership
information.

73,
This week’s ANS Editor,
EMike McCardel, AA8EM (former KC8YLD)
kc8yld at amsat dot org

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE
ANS-024
The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and infor-
mation service of AMSAT North America, The Radio Amateur Satellite
Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in Space
including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur
Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building,
launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio
satellites.

The news feed on http://www.amsat.org publishes news of Amateur
Radio in Space as soon as our volunteers can post it.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to:
ans-editor at amsat.org.

In this edition:

* In Memory of Robert J. (Bob) Carpenter, W3OTC-SK by Bill Tynan, W3XO
* AMSAT SKN Winners and Changes for Next Year
* Student Internship CubeSat Opportunities in Greenbelt, MD USA
* VHF Groups Join Forces to Sponsor “Super Conference”
* 2016 NASA Student Airborne Research Program
* AMSAT Events
* ARISS News
* Satellite Shorts From All Over

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-024.01
ANS-024 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 024.01
>From AMSAT HQ KENSINGTON, MD.
DATE January 24, 2016
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-024.01

———————————————————————

In Memory of Robert J. (Bob) Carpenter, W3OTC-SK by Bill Tynan, W3XO

Bob, a longtime friend, one-time business partner and devoted AMAST
volunteer became a Silent Key Friday, January 8th. Bob was born July 31,
1930 in Washington, DC.

I first met Bob in the late 1940s on six meters. At the time, we both lived
in Silver Spring, Maryland. After a few QSOs we decided to meet and compare
notes. I found that, in addition to the interest we shared in the VHF bands,
he was very intrigued with FM broadcasting, as I had been for years.

Following graduation from The University of Maryland, in 1951 with a degree
of Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering, Bob served in the U.S. Air
Force, at the US Air Force Research Center in Cambridge, Massachusetts. On
completing his Air Force commitment, he joined the Johns Hopkins Applied
Physics Laboratory in the DC area where I was employed. Leaving the
Laboratory 1955, Bob joined, what was then called the National Bureau of
Standards, first in Boulder, Colorado and later at their facility at
Gaithersburg, Maryland. In his early work at the Bureau, he was instrumental
in the development of technology for passing message traffic via the short
bursts of VHF frequency propagation caused by the ionization produced by
meteors entering the Earth’s atmosphere. When Bob returned to Maryland, he
was involved in development of computer networking, retiring from what is
now called The National Institute for Standard and Technology in 1992. In
1988, he received the US Department of Commerce Gold Medal Award for
Distinguished Service.

Following retirement from NIST, Bob became available to assist AMSAT, of
which he was an early member, holding AMSAT Life Membership Number 21. His
knowledge of computers, was invaluable to Martha in keeping the office
computers up to date and the various data bases current. He regularly came
into the AMSAT office up until the last few days of his life.

Bob was active on six meters up until the time he sold his home in
Rockville, Maryland and moved to a retirement facility in nearby Gaithersburg.

In earlier years, Bob did extensive traveling in Europe and elsewhere, his
favorite country to visit being France. He became quite fluent in the French
language. He went on one DXpedition, journeying to the French Caribbean
island of Guadalupe. I, and a number of other six meter operators, were able
to work a new country through Bob’s efforts.

As mentioned earlier, Bob and I shared in interest in FM broadcasting. That
interest blossomed during the late 1950s when Bob rented half of the house I
then owned in Rockville, Maryland. After much discussion of the pros and
cons, we decided to construct a station of our own. So, we applied for a
Construction Permit (CP) from FCC to build a station in Bethesda, Maryland,
a nearby suburb of Washington. Bob handled most of the technical work, while
I concentrated on the business side. He always has been more adept at the
technical side of radio and electronics than I. After receiving our CP, we
went to work in earnest to build the station. Finally, in June, 1961, FCC
came out with standards for broadcasting stereo. Bob and I reasoned that,
for a new station, such as ours, to have any chance of success, it had to
hit the air with stereo. Since there was no stereo broadcasting equipment
available at the time, much of what we needed had to be constructed by us.
This herculean task could not have been completed without Bob’s expertise,
but on November 12, 1961, only five months after FCC’s establishment of
standards for stereo broadcasting, WHFS, the DC area’s first stereo FM
station, hit the air on 102.3 MHz.

Once on the air, Bob kept WHFS on the air while I struggled with the
multitude of paperwork associated with running a small business, especially
a radio station. Each of us was smart enough to keep our “day jobs,” making
running a radio station especially difficult.

We sold the station in 1963, affording Bob and me more time for ham radio.

It has been a great pleasure to have known Bob all these years. I will miss
him and I know that Martha and all of AMSAT will miss him as well.

73, Bob.

With thanks to Perry Klein, W3PK, and Tom Pyke, K4DSD, who were responsible
for providing valuable information for this tribute to Bob.

Martha at the AMSAT Office reports: “The memorial service for Bob Carpenter,
W3OTC has been postponed for 1 week due to weather. It is now scheduled to
take place at 7:00 PM on Saturday, January 30th at the chapel of Asbury
Methodist Village in Gaithersburg MD.”

[ANS thanks Bill Tynan, W3XO, AMSAT President Emeritus for the above
information]

———————————————————————

AMSAT SKN Winners and Changes for Next Year

Thanks again to all who participated in AMSAT’s Straight Key Night 2016,
held in memory of Ben Stevenson, W2BXA. The following participants each
received at least one Best Fist nomination: AA5PK,. WA5KBH, WA8SME,
W3TMZ, W4CVV, W5PFG. Special kudos to Glenn Miller, AA5PK, who received
three.

Activity was down this year, for a variety of reasons, some having to do
with availability of suitable satellites and some to do with changes in
amateur radio in general. Since this was AMSAT’s 25th annual SKN, it’s
a good time to consider changes. While Morse as a license qualification
has gone the way of the spark gap, amateur CW activity is as popular as
ever. Straight keys and “bugs”, however, have found a niche primarily with
the boat anchor crowd, and AMSAT’s insistence on their use in OSCAR SKN is
probably holding down participation. Similar considerations have led ARRL
to broaden its annual HF event to include all forms of CW, even
computer-generated. The idea is to encourage everyone to enjoy CW operation,
no matter how they choose to do it.

So, in with the new: AMSAT CW Activity Day on OSCAR. As with the old SKN,
it will be a fun event, not a contest, and will run for 24 hours on
January 1. All forms of CW will be welcome. Instead of best fist
nominations, all participants will be encouraged to post “Soapbox”
comments to AMSAT-BB.

A further announcement will be posted in December 2016.

[ANS thanks Ray, W2RS for the above information]

———————————————————————

Student Internship CubeSat Opportunities in Greenbelt, MD USA

APPLY NOW: Paid NASA Intern Opportunities Summer 2016

The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center is offering student internship
positions for the Summer 2016 semester. Applications are being taken
on the NASA One Stop Shopping Initiative (OSSI) recruiting web site.
Go to:
https://intern.nasa.gov –> Student Opportunities –>
then click on the first dropdown link to start reading all about
the internships and the process of applying. There is no need for
students to upload a resume in OSSI when they apply. The resume
is essentially built through the student’s responses to the
questions within the online application.

Go to:
https://intern.nasa.gov/ossi/web/public/guest/searchOpps/
to search and filter through the many Opportunities at the
different NASA locations across the country in addition to the
Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. Search
on “cubesat” without the quotes to see examples from which
the student may select to apply.

One such Opportunity, “CubeSat Ground Station Development,”
Is being offered by NASA engineer and fellow AMSAT member
Pat Kilroy, N8PK. He is looking for university level students
with a course of study in engineering. Electrical or Electronics
Engineering (EE) or Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE)
majors in their junior class or higher this fall are sought for
the 10-week summer program. Pat says experience in hardware
and certain skills are required, as described in the text of
his Opportunity listing.

Open to U.S. citizens.

The student application instructions provide a deadline of March 1
to apply, but mentors have already started to evaluate applications
and make their selections. The word to the wise is to get in one’s
application immediately. Don’t wait.

Applications must be made via the OSSI web. Please be sure to
include your Amateur Radio callsign under the Special Skills
section — or that you are studying for it.

[ANS thanks NASA and Pat, N8PK for the above information]

———————————————————————

VHF Groups Join Forces to Sponsor “Super Conference”

The Southeastern VHF Society (SVHFS), North East Weak Signal Group (NEWS)
and Mount Airy VHF Radio Club (Pack Rats) are cosponsoring a VHF Super
Conference, hosted by the Grid Pirates Contest Group (K8GP) and Directive
Systems and Engineering. The conference will take place April 15-17 in
Sterling, Virginia.

Early registration discounts are available. Conference Proceedings in
printed and digital form will be available after the event. Sign up when
registering. All registrations include lunch and all-day beverages.

The event will feature an array of forums and workshops, a test lab, and a
conference banquet. A microwave loop Yagi workshop will be offered during
the weekend at an additional fee. The workshop will explain how loop Yagis
work, how to adjust them, and how to build one. Free shuttle service will be
available to the Udvar-Hazy Air & Space Museum.

A second call for papers and presentations for the VHF Super Conference has
been issued. The conference sponsors are seeking presentations or papers
dealing with all aspects of VHF, UHF, microwave, and higher. Topics may
include operating, contesting, homebrewing, software, EME, surplus,
antennas, test equipment, amplifiers, and SDR. Photos are encouraged.

Steve Kostro, N2CEI, and Paul Wade, W1GHZ, are coordinating Proceedings.
Direct submissions and questions to them via e-mail.

View the ARRL press release at:
http://www.arrl.org/news/vhf-groups-join-forces-to-sponsor-super-conference

[ANS thanks the ARRL for the above information]

———————————————————————

2016 NASA Student Airborne Research Program

The NASA Airborne Science Program invites highly motivated undergraduate
students currently in their junior year to apply for the NASA Student
Airborne Research Program, also known as SARP 2016. The program provides
students with hands-on research experience in all aspects of a major
scientific campaign, from detailed planning on how to achieve mission
objectives to formal presentation of results and conclusions to peers and
others. Students will assist in the operation of airborne instruments aboard
the NASA DC-8 aircraft. They also will analyze remote-sensing data collected
during the program from the NASA ER-2.

The program takes place in summer 2016. Instrument and flight preparations,
and the research flights themselves, will occur at NASA’s Armstrong Flight
Research Center in Palmdale, California. Postflight data analysis and
interpretation will take place at the University of California, Irvine.

Successful applicants will be awarded a stipend plus a travel allowance for
eight weeks of participation in the program. Housing and local
transportation also will be provided.

The deadline for applications is Feb. 2, 2016.

For more information and to download the program application, visit
http://www.nserc.und.edu/sarp/sarp-2016.

Specific questions about the program should be directed to
SARP2016@nserc.und.edu.

[ANS thanks the NASA Education Express Message — Jan. 21, 2016 for the
above information]

———————————————————————

AMSAT Events

Information about AMSAT activities at other important events around
the country. Examples of these events are radio club meetings where
AMSAT Area Coordinators give presentations, demonstrations of working
amateur satellites, and hamfests with an AMSAT presence (a table with
AMSAT literature and merchandise, sometimes also with presentations,
forums, and/or demonstrations).

*Friday and Saturday, 19-20 February 2016 – Yuma Hamfest and 2016 ARRL
Southwest Division Convention in Yuma AZ

*Friday, 4 March 2016 – presentation for the Associated Radio Amateurs
of Long Beach meeting in Signal Hill CA

*Saturday and Sunday, 12-13 March 2016 – ScienceCity science fair, on
the University of Arizona campus in Tucson AZ

*Saturday, 19 March 2016 – Scottsdale Amateur Radio Club Spring
Hamfest 2016 in Scottsdale AZ

*Saturday, 26 March 2016 – Tucson Spring Hamfest in Tucson AZ

*Saturday, 7 May 2016 – Cochise Amateur Radio Association Hamfest in
Sierra Vista AZ

*Saturday, 4 June 2016 – White Mountain Hamfest in Show Low AZ

[ANS thanks AMSAT-NA for the above information]

———————————————————————

ARISS News

Sucessful Contacts

Brihaspati Vidyasadan, Kathmandu, Nepal, telebridge via VK5ZAI
The ISS callsign was NA1SS
The scheduled astronaut was Timothy Peake KG5BVI
Contact was successful: Wed 2016-01-20 08:37:04 UTC 26 deg

A telebridge contact via VK5ZAI with students at Brihaspati Vidyasadan,
Kathmandu, Nepal was successful 01/20/2016 at 08:37:04 UTC 26 deg.
Astronaut Tim Peake, KG5BVI answered 17 questions for students. An
audience of about 300 included students from 10 other schools, as
well as the British Ambassador to Nepal, the Cultural Affairs Officer
from the US Embassy, and a member of the National Human Rights
Commission and former Ministry for Science and Technology.

Brihaspati Vidyasadan is a 32 year old High school, located in
Kathmandu, Nepal. Brihaspati runs classes from nursery to 100 at
secondary level and the 10+2 program in Science and Management at the
higher secondary Level. Besides these Brihaspati also runs Diploma in
Hospitality Management and Tourism in affiliation with Confederation
of Tourism and Hospitality (CTH), UK.

Brihaspati is known for its academic excellence. To date Brihaspati
has produced over 2000 SLC graduates and over 600 +2 graduates who
have achieved excellent academic achievements. Brihaspati has also
been awarded the “Best School in Nepal” in 2055BS.

Brihaspati is also known for its co-curricular and extra-curricular
activities including sports, debates and concerts. Over the years
the school has achieved Inter-school successes in football (soccer),
cricket and basketball at national levels. School has also successes
in inter-school competitions like debate, elocution and concerts.

For its academic, co-curricular and extra-curricular achievements
Brihaspati has been placed among the Class A schools of Nepal by the
Ministry of Education, Government of Nepal.

Brihaspati staff and students have been known for their innovation
in education. The school is reputed to be the first school in Nepal
to introduce computer education. Brihaspati houses clubs like
Lokopakar, which is a student club that looks into Humanitarian aid.
Brihaspati students recently started gThink Ink h, an activity
designed using the principles of Extreme Design from Stanford for
instilling critical thinking and problem solving skills in students.
This program has gained attention of a lot of people in the academia
at a very rapid pace.

Brihaspati is located in a 25 acre land space at the heart of
Kathmandu within the Balmandir compound. It has academic facility
that is of very high standards. It houses the Free and Open Source
Research Lab and Ham (amateur radio) facility that students and staff
have access to.

Recently during the earthquake of Nepal, one of the buildings of
Brihaspati was used by ham radio operators from Nepal and India to
coordinate search and reconciliation of families where over 500
families were reunited with their loved ones.

Some local news media video reports are available at

http://thehimalayantimes.com/kathmandu/british-astronaut-tells-nepali-
students-to-follow-their-cherished-dreams/

http://e-visitnepal.blogspot.se/2016/01/talk-to-astronauts.html

http://nagariknews.com/feature-article/story/52883.html

Upcoming Contacts

A direct contact with students at PSU. Wittayanusorn School, Kho Hong
District, Hat Yai, Songkhla, Thailand is scheduled for Sat
2016-01-30 11:06:23 UTC 63 deg.

PSU. Wittayanusorn School, established in 2005, is a Prince of Songkla
University affiliated private high school in Hatyai, Songkhla Province,
Thailand. The school serves approximately 1,200 students in 7th to 12th grade.
The school’s identity colors are blue and grey. The blue represents
sustainability and grey stands for wisdom. The school motto is “wisdom brings
lasting success and happiness”. The guiding principle is “our soul is for the
benefit of mankind”. The desired characteristics of our students are “SMART+”
which are referred to scientific mind, good manner, aesthetic appreciation,
responsibility and reliability, teamwork, and +global citizenship. Green
education is our school’s uniqueness which focuses on education for sustainable
development.

PSU. Wittayanusorn School is dedicated to create an exceptional teaching and
learning environment in which morality is emphasized, science and mathematics
concepts are embedded. The school curriculum is designed to maximize each
student’s potential for critical thinking, intellectual curiosity, community
involvement, and responsible leadership. Additionally, the school has been
selected by the Ministry of Science and Technology to be one of the first four
regional schools of the country to host a special three-year science classroom
program for high school level, grades 10 to 12, according to the proactive
human resources development project to upgrade the science and technology
capability of the country. The selection of students with high ability in
mathematics and science for the science classroom program is carried out by the
Institute for the Promotion of Teaching Science and Technology and closely
collaborated with Prince of Songkla University. Each student who passes the
selection will be entitled to a scholarship from grade 10 onwards, and
subjected to certain additional criteria, he/she will be eligible for a
scholarship until he/she can complete his/her education up to a doctoral degree
level.

PSU Wittayanusorn School was accredited with the score 97.02% by the Office of
National Education Standards and Quality Assessment on May 26, 2015.

Watch
http://www.ariss.org/upcoming-contacts.html
for information about upcoming contacts as they are scheduled.

[ANS thanks ARISS, and Charlie, AJ9N for the above information]

———————————————————————

Satellite Shorts From All Over

Yuri UT1FG is on the move

For those who chase Yuri in new grids, I received an update that he has left
port in Montreal and is headed to Algiers.

[ANS thanks Drew, KO4MA, AMSAT Vice President for Operations for the above
information]

———————————————————————

/EX

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the
President’s Club. Members of the President’s Club, as sustaining
donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive addi-
tional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT
Office.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership
at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students
enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the stu-
dent rate for a maximum of 6 post-secondary years in this status.
Contact Martha at the AMSAT Office for additional student membership
information.

73,
This week’s ANS Editor,
Joe Spier, K6WAO
k6wao at amsat dot org

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE
ANS-017

The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and infor-
mation service of AMSAT North America, The Radio Amateur Satellite
Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in Space

including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur
Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building,
launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio
satellites.

The news feed on http://www.amsat.org publishes news of Amateur
Radio in Space as soon as our volunteers can post it.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to:
ans-editor at amsat.org.

In this edition:

* ARRL President Bestows President’s Award on AMSAT’s Tom Clark, K3IO
* Joseph Spier, K6WAO, Appointed VP-Educational Relations
* 25 Year AMSAT Office Volunteer Bob Carpenter, W3OTC, SK
* Nepal students to speak to Tim Peake
* ESA Online Astronaut Selection Tes

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-017.01
ANS-017 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 017.01
From AMSAT HQ Kensington, MD.
January 17, 2016
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-017.01

ARRL President Bestows President’s Award on AMSAT’s Tom Clark, K3IO

The ARRL has honored veteran AMSAT personality and Amateur Radio digital pioneer
Tom Clark, K3IO (ex-W3IWI), with its President’s Award. ARRL President Kay
Craigie, N3KN, presented the award plaque to Clark at a January 10 meeting of
the Potomac Valley Radio Club in Blacksburg, Virginia. The plaque, which bears a
likeness of ARRL Co-Founder Hiram Percy Maxim, W1AW, recognizes Clark’s 60 years
of advancing Amateur Radio technology.

Former AMSAT President and current AMSAT Director Bob McGwier, N4HY, stated
directly. “There would be no AMSAT to inspire all of this work without Tom
Clark,” he said, noting that the organization was in serious trouble after the
Phase 3A satellite launch failure.

“Tom took over as president of AMSAT, and he saved the organization and inspired
all of us to look to the future and aim for the stars,” McGwier said. “All that
has followed, including PACSAT and microsats, CubeSats, AO-13, all the way
through AO-85, are a direct result of Tom Clark saving AMSAT and providing it
leadership as president from 1980 to 1987 and continuous leadership on the Board
of Directors of AMSAT from 1976 until today.”

McGwier said it was Clark who convinced him in 1985 that the future lay in
digital signal processing — DSP. “We started the TAPR/AMSAT DSP project, and it
was announced in 1987,” he said. “We showed in our efforts that small stations
with small antennas could bounce signals off the moon, and, using the power of
DSP, we could see the signals in our computer displays.”

McGwier said this led to the SDX, the Software Defined Transponder, included in
ARISSat and in AMSAT’s Phase 3E. McGwier said Clark was an early supporter of
women in science, too.

“Tom is now and always will be a leader, mentor — the chief scientist for all of
Amateur Radio,” he said.

Clark is an adviser to Virginia Tech as adjunct professor of aerospace and ocean
engineering and of electrical and computer Engineering. McGwier said Clark will
play a crucial role in the Phase 4B geosynchronous satellite opportunity on the
USAF Wide Field of View spacecraft, in which Virginia Tech is a partner.

[ANS thanks ARRL for the above information]

———————————————————————

Joseph Spier, K6WAO, Appointed VP-Educational Relations

AMSAT President Barry Baines, WD4ASW has accepted the resignation of
E. Michael “EMike” McCardel, AA8EM, as VP-Educational Relations and
appointed Joseph Spier, K6WAO, as his replacement.

E. Michael McCardel, AA8EM, of Howard, OH was first appointed as an
Associate Director for Educational Outreach under former VP
Educational Relations Mark Hammond, N8MH, in 2011 and succeeded Mark
as VP Educational Relations in September 2013. Among EMike’s biggest
successes were establishing a solid relation with ARRL’s Education
Division and working closely with ARISS as a member of its Executive
Team. He was instrumental with keeping ARISS going and restructuring
the ARISS program after funding was cut for Teaching From Space
(TFS). At the time TFS was the primary NASA partner and education
liaison for ARISS. TFS lead the school proposal and selection process
in the USA. That process is now lead by ARRL and AMSAT. AMSAT VP
Human Spaceflight Frank Bauer, KA3HDO, notes, “EMike has been
invaluable to ARISS and I will miss his support. He and I worked
behind the scenes to rescue ARISS through our discussions at the ISS
Conference in 2014. And his rapport with ARRL is
outstanding…something I will miss dearly. I thank EMike for making
that all happen for ARISS.”

EMike also worked at establishing relations with various colleges
and universities. He pushed to make aware the importance of AMSAT as
an educational organization by emphasizing how education is part of
AMSAT’s earliest Mission Statements and Objectives and reminding us
of all the educational programs and outreaches AMSAT has engaged in
during its history.

AMSAT President Barry Baines, WD4ASW notes, “EMike made a positive
difference and helped set the course in a number of areas involving
Educational Outreach, ARISS, and the overall direction of AMSAT.
While I regret losing your considerable enthusiasm and talents, I
understand the need to ‘recalibrate’ your priorities.”

EMike will complete his duties on January 31, citing time and
commitments outside of AMSAT as his reason for stepping down. EMike
will continue serving AMSAT as one of the rotating editors for the
AMSAT News Service (ANS).

With EMike’s resignation, the appointment of Joseph Spier, K6WAO of
Weimar, CA, as the new VP-Educational Relations is also announced. Joe
came on board with the Educational Relation’s team in 2011 serving as
Associate Director then Director for Educational Outreach.

EMike noted, “Joe and I started with Educational Relations at the
same time and we have always had a great personal and working
relationship. Joe is extremely enthusiastic and someone who thinks
outside the box. Many have pointed out those similarities between us.
However, Joe will bring a different dimension to the position because
of his background in engineering. I support Joe as he takes over and
am excited to see what new and exciting things are in store for AMSAT
Education under his direction.”

“I’m very pleased that Joe has agreed to become our next VP-Educational
Relations”, notes AMSAT President Barry Baines, WD4ASW. “Joe is passionate
about integrating amateur radio into educational opportunities at all
educational levels. His engineering background will help in interacting with
university engineering departments encouraging a greater focus on educational
impacts of amateur spacecraft, developing new ways of bringing science to the
class room. He recognizes the importance of ARISS in reaching out to students
based upon his personal involvement in managing an ARISS contact as part of the
2012 Pacificon Convention. His interaction with young people at the 2014 ARRL
Centennial Convention where he encouraged their curiosity about AMSAT’s cubesat
design by their holding the engineering mockup while visiting the AMSAT booth
created many positive impressions for both the students and their parents. I
look forward to working with Joe to further enhance our ability to touch
students through amateur radio satellites and develop new ways to incorporate
education into AMSAT’s mission.”

E. Michael McCardel, AA8EM, former KC8YLD
V.P. for Educational Relations, AMSAT-NA

[ANS thanks EMike, AA8EM, for the above information]

———————————————————————

25 Year AMSAT Office Volunteer Bob Carpenter, W3OTC, SK

Bob Carpenter, W3OTC died on January 8th. Since 1991 Bob had volunteered
at the AMSAT Office on a weekly basis. He was our computer specialist and
handled the donations for AMSAT.

A memorial service will be held on January 23rd at 7:00PM a the Guild
Memorial Chapel, Asbury Methodist Village, 211 Russell Ave, Gaithersburg MD.

[ANS thanks Martha for the above information]

———————————————————————

Nepal students to speak to Tim Peake

UK astronaut Tim Peake KG5BVI will be using amateur radio to talk to students at
Brihaspati Vidhyasadan School (BVS) in Nepal on Wednesday, January 20.

The Himalayan Times reports this is the first link up between a school in Nepal
and the International Space Station (ISS). It will be a Telebridge contact via
Tony Hutchison VK5ZAI in Australia and is scheduled for Wednesday, January 20 at
08:37:04 UT. The ISS should be in range of the Telebridge station for about 8
minutes.

BVS is organizing an Exhibition during the week of the contact from January
19-23. Experts as well as knowledgeable students will be at hand to respond to
queries of visiting students who will be able to get acquainted with amateur
radio during the exhibition.

The Nepal Amateur Radio Operators’ Society is one of the organizations
supporting the exhibition.

Brihaspati Vidyasadan is a 32 year old High school, located in Kathmandu, Nepal.
Brihaspati runs classes from nursery to 100 at secondary level and the 10+2
program in Science and Management at the higher secondary Level. Besides these
Brihaspati also runs Diploma in Hospitality Managemant and Tourism in
affiliation with Confederation of Tourism and Hospitality (CTH), UK.

Brihaspati is known for its academic excellence. To date Brihaspati has produced
over 2000 SLC graduates and over 600 +2 graduates who have achieved excellent
academic achievements. Brihaspati has also been awarded the “Best School in
Nepal” in 2055BS.

Brihaspati is also known for its co-curricular and extra-curricular activities
including sports, debates and concerts. Over the years the school has achieved
Inter-school successes in football (soccer), cricket and basketball at national
levels. School has also successes in inter-school competitions like debate,
elocution and concerts.

For its academic, co-curricular and extra-curricular achievements Brihaspati has
been placed among the Class A schools of Nepal by the Ministry of Education,
Government of Nepal.

Brihaspati staff and students have been known for their innovation in education.
The school is reputed to be the first school in Nepal to introduce computer
education. Brihaspati houses clubs like Lokopakar, which is a student club that
looks into Humanitarian aid. Brihaspati students recently started gThink
Ink h, an activity designed using the principles of Extreme Design from Stanford
for instilling critical thinking and problem solving skills in students. This
program has gained attention of a lot of people in the academia at a very rapid
pace.

Brihaspati is located in a 25 acre land space at the heart of Kathmandu within
the Balmandir compound. It has academic facility that is of very high
standards. It houses the Free and Open Source Research Lab and Ham (amateur
radio) facility that students and staff have access to.

Recently during the earthquake of Nepal, one of the buildings of Brihaspati was
used by ham radio operators from Nepal and India to coordinate search and
reconciliation of families where over 500 families were reunited with their
loved ones.

Read The Himalayan Times story at
https://thehimalayantimes.com/nepal/nepali-students-to-talk-to-astronaut-in-
intl-space-station/

Brihaspati Vidhyasadan School

BVS Talks To ISS


https://www.facebook.com/bvsTalksToISS/

ARISS http://www.ariss.org/upcoming-contacts.html

[ANS thanks AMSAT-UK for the above information]

———————————————————————

ESA Online Astronaut Selection Test

The European Space Agency is offering a trial version of a test developed for
future astronauts for you to try at home – and by taking part you will help us
select a new generation of astronauts.

Read the ESA press release at:

http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Human_Spaceflight/Astronauts/Test_your_astrona
ut_skills_and_help_ESA

Access the astronaut selection test at:

The astronaut selection test

[ANS thanks the European Space Agency for the above information]

/EX

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the
President’s Club. Members of the President’s Club, as sustaining
donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive addi-
tional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT
Office.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership
at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students
enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the stu-
dent rate for a maximum of 6 post-secondary years in this status.
Contact Martha at the AMSAT Office for additional student membership
information.

73,
This week’s ANS Editor,
Lee McLamb, KU4OS
ku4os at amsat dot org

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE
ANS-010

The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and infor-
mation service of AMSAT North America, The Radio Amateur Satellite
Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in Space
including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur
Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building,
launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio
satellites.

The news feed on http://www.amsat.org publishes news of Amateur
Radio in Space as soon as our volunteers can post it.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to:
ans-editor at amsat.org.

In this edition:

* Cruising to the 2016 AMSAT Space Symposium
* ARISS-US Receives $5,000 Grant from Yasme Foundation
* Best Fist Nominations Due
* Your 2015 Space Symposium Photos Needed!
* ARISS Commemorative SSTV Event Update
* ARISS News
* Satellite Shorts From All Over

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-010.01
ANS-010 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 010.01
From AMSAT HQ KENSINGTON, MD.
[MONTH DAY, YEAR]
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-010.01

Cruising to the 2016 AMSAT Space Symposium

The 2016 AMSAT Space Symposium will be held aboard a commercial
cruise ship departing from the port of Galveston, Texas. Sail dates
are November 10-14 aboard the Carnival Liberty. Galveston is
conveniently located near Houston, Texas with access from both the
George Bush Intercontinental Airport (IAH) and the Houston Hobby
Airport (HOU.) This cruise will embark on Thursday afternoon at
16:00 CST and return on the following Monday morning at 08:00 CST.
The trip includes two full days at sea and one day in port at
Cozumel, Mexico. Symposium presentations and meetings will be
conducted during the days at sea to allow free time during the stop
in Cozumel. The AMSAT Board of Directors meeting will occur on shore
at a Galveston hotel in the days prior to the Symposium.

This year’s cruise ship venue offers an environment for significant
others, families, and friends to attend the AMSAT Symposium event
with you. Many activities are available on a cruise ship including
musical and theatrical performances, comedy, dancing, and casino
gaming. During the stop in Cozumel there are many onshore activities
and excursions available for your pleasure. There will be no post-
Symposium tour offered since this venue incorporates the Cozumel
visit.

In preparation for this upcoming Symposium it is recommended you
obtain a passport for travel as soon as possible. United States
residents may find the most convenient place to obtain a passport is
their nearest US Post Office. Not all USPS locations offer this
service; check the US Postal Service website:
https://www.usps.com/international/passports.htm

Details on travel documents required for US citizens to take a
Carnival cruise originating at a US Port and returning to the same
port may be found here:
https://help.carnival.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/1406

AMSAT is offering a group rate and booking code available starting
January 5. Please book your cruise directly by calling 1-800-438-
6744 and dialing extension number 70005. Our group name is AMSAT and
the group code is 8Z0FR5. It is recommended you make reservations
very early since cabins are held for a short period of time.
Reservations require a $150 USD per person deposit. The deposit is
fully refundable up until September 11. Rates may vary depending
upon cabin type selected and occupancy. Please utilize the group
code as this directly benefits the Symposium and the amenities we are
able to offer attendees.

Further details will be released in the coming months via ANS, AMSAT-
BB, and the AMSAT Journal.

[ANS thanks Clayton W5PFG for the above information]

———————————————————————

ARISS-US Receives $5,000 Grant from Yasme Foundation

The ARISS-US Team is thrilled to announce that it received a $5,000
grant from the Yasme Foundation, awarded to support the development
of the power converters needed as a part of an extensive upgrade to
the entire ARISS radio system onboard the International Space
Station. 

Ward Silver, N0AX, President of the Yasme Foundation, www.yasme.org,
said the Yasme Board decided to support ARISS, in part, as a catalyst
for individuals and other groups to follow suit by donating to the
radio system cause. Ward commented:

“While you have a long way to go in funding the whole upgrade
project, we hope our grant will encourage organizations and
individuals to donate to ARISS. Yasme is happy to get that ball
rolling.”

ARISS International Chair Frank Bauer, KA3HDO, noted that receiving
grants from more groups similar to Yasme can result in bigger
sponsors being much more likely to donate funds and in-kind resources
to the radio project. The 12 ARISS Delegates from around the world
had voted in August 2015 to move forward with the planning that will
ultimately develop all hardware needed for an upgraded ARISS radio
system if funding could be raised. ARISS Chair Bauer, explaining that
the power converters are critical to the overall ARISS equipment
upgrade, remarked:

“The Yasme grant will jump start the project by allowing the ARISS
hardware team to build a prototype converter, purchase critical parts
for the flight converters, and further develop the design.  We will
continue our pursuit of other funding so as to realize the completion
of the entire upgrade project.”

ARISS-US Delegate Rosalie White, K1STO, thanked Silver for his
personal effort in delineating ARISS’s hardware needs and goals to
the Yasme Board. She added:

“Garnering the Yasme grant is a major step in helping ARISS progress
with our fundraising for the upgraded system. We are elated to know
that Yasme has faith in ARISS and its goals of piquing the interest
of young people in science, technology, engineering, math, space,
communications, and amateur radio.”

Just three weeks ago in mid-December, a group of ARISS-US team
members were at Johnson Space Center solidifying plans for the design
of this next generation radio system. Other groups and individuals
interested in supporting ARISS goals through a donation can contact
Frank Bauer, KA3HDO, at ka3hdo@verizon.net or can go to the AMSAT
Website, www.amsat.org, and submit a donation directly using the
ARISS Donate button. ARISS rewards a beautiful ARISS Challenge Coin
to donors giving $100.00 or more.

About ARISS

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) is a
cooperative venture of international amateur radio societies and the
space agencies that support the International Space Station (ISS). In
the United States, sponsors are the Radio Amateur Satellite
Corporation (AMSAT), the American Radio Relay League (ARRL), and the
National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).The primary goal
of ARISS is to promote exploration of science, technology,
engineering, and mathematics (STEM) topics by organizing scheduled
contacts via amateur radio between crew members aboard the ISS and
students in classrooms or informal education venues. With the help
of experienced amateur radio volunteers, ISS crews speak directly
with large audiences in a variety of public forums. Before and
during these radio contacts, students, teachers, parents, and
communities learn about space, space technologies, and amateur radio.
For more information, see www.ariss.org, www.amsat.org, and
www.arrl.org.

[ANS thanks Yasme ans ARISS for the above information]

———————————————————————

Best Fist Nominations Due

Ray Soifer, W2RS, would like to thank to all who participated in
AMSAT’s Straight Key Night on OSCAR 2016. If you haven’t already
done so, please take a moment to nominate someone you worked for Best
Fist. Your nominee need not have had the best fist of those you
heard, only of those you worked.

Send your nomination to w2rs at amsat.org

[ANS thanks Ray W2RS for the above information]

———————————————————————

Your 2015 Space Symposium Photos Needed!

AMSAT Journal Editor, Joe Kornowski KB6IGK, reports that the AMSAT
Journal needs your photos from the 33rd Space Symposium in October
2015. Please send your hi-res photos, with captions if possible, to
journal at amsat.org by January 17.

[ANS thanks Joe KB6IGK for the above information]

———————————————————————

ARISS Commemorative SSTV Event Update

The SSTV commemoration of the first ARISS contact events is now
tentatively planned for January 16. The transmission mode will be
PD120.

Because preparations are still in process, it is suggested that you
stay tuned to AMSAT-BB and the AMSAT and ARISS web site for the
latest information on this event.

[ANS thanks ARISS for the above information]

———————————————————————

ARISS News

+ A Successful contact was made between Frederick W. Harnett Middle
School, Blackstone, Massachusetts, USA and Astronaut Timothy Peake
KG5BVI using Callsign NA1SS. The contact began 2016-01-05 17:42 UTC
and lasted about nine and a half minutes. Contact was telebridged via
K6DUE. ARISS Mentor was AJ9N. This represents ARISS’ 981st contact.

+ A Successful contact was made between Sandringham School, St.
Albans, Hertfordshire, UK and Astronaut Timothy Peake KG5BVI using
Callsign GB1SS. The contact began 2016-01-08 08:47:47 UTC and lasted
about nine and a half minutes. Contact was direct via GB1SAN. ARISS
Mentor was MØXTD. This represents ARISS’ 982nd contact.

Upcoming ARISS Contact Schedule

Scuola Secondaria di Primo Grado “Benedetto Croce”, Civate, Italy,
telebridge via VK5ZAI The ISS callsign is presently scheduled to be
NA1SS. The scheduled astronaut is Tim Kopra KE5UDN
Contact is a go for: Wed 2016-01-13 11:35:44 UTC

ARISS is always glad to receive listener reports for the above
contacts. ARISS thanks everyone in advance for their assistance.
Feel free to send your reports to aj9n@amsat.org or aj9n@aol.com.

ARISS Commemorative SSTV Event Update

The SSTV commemoration of the first ARISS contact events is now
tentatively planned for January 16. The transmission mode will
be PD120.

Because preparations are still in process, it is suggested that you
stay tuned to AMSAT-BB and the AMSAT and ARISS web site for the
latest information on this event and others that ARISS plans to
conduct over the next few months.

Remember that the official page for all things ARISS is
www.ariss.org

[ANS thanks ARISS, Charlie AJ9N and David AA4KN for the above
information]

———————————————————————

Satellite Shorts From All Over

+ Satellite Operations from Cowtown Hamfest, January 15-16

Keith Pugh W5IU, reports that the Cowtown Hamfest in Forest Hill,
Texas, a suburg of Fort Worth, will be held Friday and Saturday, 15-
16 January. Keith intends be on the air for as many passes as he
can during the hamfest hours.

[ANS thanks Keith W5IU for the above information]

———————————————————————

/EX

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the
President’s Club. Members of the President’s Club, as sustaining
donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive addi-
tional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT
Office.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership
at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students
enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the stu-
dent rate for a maximum of 6 post-secondary years in this status.
Contact Martha at the AMSAT Office for additional student membership
information.

73,
This week’s ANS Editor,
EMike McCardel, AA8EM (Former KC8YLD)
kc8yld at amsat dot org

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE
ANS-003
The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and infor-
mation service of AMSAT North America, The Radio Amateur Satellite
Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in Space
including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur
Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building,
launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio
satellites.

The news feed on http://www.amsat.org publishes news of Amateur
Radio in Space as soon as our volunteers can post it.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to:
ans-editor at amsat.org.

In this edition:

* Fox-1Cliff and -1D matching contribution offer
* iCubeSat 2016, 5th Interplanetary CubeSat Workshop, Oxford, UK –
Call for papers and registration
* Spring 2016 CubeSat Workshop Abstracts Submission Due January 15
* 2016 NASA Academy
* 2016 NOAA Undergraduate Scholarships
* Tim Peake Sandringham School UK Contact
* AMSAT Events
* ARISS News

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-003.01
ANS-003 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 003.01
>From AMSAT HQ KENSINGTON, MD.
DATE January 3, 2016
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-003.01

———————————————————————

Fox-1Cliff and -1D matching contribution offer

I just want to thank everyone for the outstanding response to our year-end
request for support for the Fox-1Cliff and -1D fundraiser. During the period
of December 25th to December 31st, a total of $7052.41 was raised online
through the FundRazr app. This includes a pledged $1000 matching donation
from a generous donor/member.

73 weeks ago when we announced the launch opportunity for Fox-1Cliff
(and later including -1D), we set $25,000 as a goal for online fundraising
through social media and the FundRazr app. This amount covers a fractional but
significant portion of the launch expense. (The total cost of construction and
launch was estimated to be $125,000.) I’m very pleased that as of the 31th
of December, we have raised $26,458 from over 250 contributors. Donations have
varied from $3 and up, so everyone may contribute and be recognized.

There is a continuing need to raise the additional funds necessary to launch
Fox-1Cliff and Fox-1D in 2016. Just visit
https://fundrazr.com/campaigns/6pz92/ab/561Zd
and pick your level of support. Donations of $1000 or more will receive a
plaque with a solar panel protective cover after launch, and $100 qualifies
for a Fox challenge coin to be delivered in 6-8 weeks when the next shipment
arrives.

Please see

Fox-1Cliff and -1D Matching Contributions Offer


and

AMSAT-NA Announces New Fox Satellite Launch in 2015


for additional information.

Thank you for the support,

[ANS thanks Drew Glasbrenner, KO4MA, AMSAT VP Operations for the above
information]

———————————————————————

iCubeSat 2016, 5th Interplanetary CubeSat Workshop, Oxford, UK –
Call for papers and registration

iCubeSat 2016 – 5th Interplanetary CubeSat Workshop
24-25 May 2016, Oxford, United Kingdom

Call for papers and registration

iCubeSat 2016, the 5th Interplanetary CubeSat Workshop, will address
the technical challenges, opportunities, and practicalities of
interplanetary space exploration with CubeSats. The workshop provides
a unique environment for open wide ranging practical collaboration
between academic researchers, industry professionals, policy makers
and students developing this new and rapidly growing field.

Technical Program

Talks and round tables will focus on three themes: technology,
science, and open collaboration. The program will also include
unconference sessions to provide additional opportunities to engage
with the interplanetary CubeSat community and potential collaborators.
Talks and supporting material will be streamed and archived on the
conference website. A lively social program in and around summertime
Oxford will be arranged for participants and their guests.

Abstract Submission and Dates

Talks on astrodynamics, attitude control and determination systems,
citizen science, communications, landers, launch opportunities, open
source approaches, outreach, payloads, policy, power systems,
propulsion, reentry systems, ride-shares, science missions, software,
standardization, structures, systems engineering and other related
topics are all welcome.

1st June 2015 Registration opens at
http://iCubeSat.org/registration
1st April 2016 Abstract upload deadline
15th April 2016 Notification of abstract acceptance
20th May 2016 Presentation (and optional paper) upload deadline

Please confirm your interest in presenting or attending as soon as
possible (to assist us size the venue) by completing the registration
form at
http://iCubeSat.org/registration

Exhibition

CubeSat specialists and other vendors are invited to contact
exhibit@iCubeSat.org for details of exhibition opportunities.

Location

The 5th Interplanetary CubeSat Workshop will be held on or near
the University of Oxford campus, Oxford, United Kingdom
on Tuesday, May 24th and Wednesday May 25th, 2016.

Organizers

The organizing committee can be contacted at committee@iCubeSat.org

See you in Oxford!

pp iCubeSat 2016 Organising Committee
www.iCubeSat.org

Download the conference poster:
https://icubesat.files.wordpress.com/2015/06/20150606_icubesat2016poster.pdf

[ANS thanks the 5th Interplanetary CubeSat Workshop for the above information]

———————————————————————

Spring 2016 CubeSat Workshop Abstracts Submission Due January 15

13th Annual CubeSat Developer’s Workshop
Abstract Submission Deadline is JANUARY 15, 2016!
Workshop Dates: April 20-22, 2016
San Luis Obispo, CA, US

Please keep abstracts under 500 words, the abstracts should indicate the ideas
addressed within the presentation or poster, and the objectives of the
presentation/poster. Readers should not have to read the full text to
understand the abstract.

More importantly, any topic is welcome!

See
http://cubesat.atl.calpoly.edu/index.php/workshops/upcoming-workshops/
123–workshop-schedule
or
http://www.cubesat.org/

[ANS thanks www.cubesat.org/ for the above information]

———————————————————————

2016 NASA Academy

The 2016 NASA Academy is being offered at three locations: NASA’s Ames
Research Center in California, NASA’s Glenn Research Center in Ohio, and
NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Alabama. Applications are being
solicited for this 10-week summer experience for college students with
emphasis on immersive and integrated multidisciplinary exposure and
training. Activities include laboratory research, a group project, lectures,
meetings with experts and administrators, visits to NASA centers and
space-related industries, and technical presentations. Students learn how
NASA and its centers operate, gain experience in world-class laboratories,
and participate in leadership development and team-building activities.

Applicants must be U.S. citizens (including citizens of the U.S. territories
Puerto Rico, Guam, U.S. Virgin Islands and Northern Marianas) majoring in a
STEM discipline. The applicants must be undergraduate or graduate students
enrolled full-time in accredited universities and colleges in the U.S. and
its territories. Students may apply to any of the NASA Academy opportunities
by following these steps:

1. Log into the NASA One Stop Shopping Initiative, or OSSI, site at
https://intern.nasa.gov.
2. Register and set up an account.
3. Select the “Search Opportunities” tab at the top bar.
4. Select “NASA Center(s) of Interest” under “NASA Center/Facility.”
5. Enter “Academy” in the “Keywords” block at the bottom of the screen.
6. Click the “Search” button at the very bottom of screen; a list of Academy
Opportunities will then be displayed.
7. Click on the “View” icon in the first column under “Action” to read about
the Opportunity of interest, followed by comments on additional instructions
for completing the application, including two requested essays.

The deadline for receipt of NASA Academy application(s) and associated
documents is Feb. 16, 2016.

Please direct questions about NASA Academy to
NASA-Academy-Application@mail.nasa.gov.

[ANS thanks the NASA Education Express Message — Dec. 30, 2015 for the
above information]

———————————————————————

2016 NOAA Undergraduate Scholarships

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration is accepting
applications for its 2016 Educational Partnership Program Undergraduate
Scholarship and 2016 Ernest F. Hollings Scholarship Programs.

The Educational Partnership Program Undergraduate Scholarship Program
provides scholarships for two years of undergraduate study to students
majoring in STEM fields that directly support NOAA’s mission. Participants
conduct research at a NOAA facility during two paid summer internships. A
stipend and housing allowance is provided. Students attending an accredited
Minority Serving Institution as defined by the U.S. Department of Education
(Hispanic Serving Institutions, Historically Black Colleges and
Universities, Tribal Colleges and Universities, Alaskan-Native Serving
Institutions, and Native Hawaiian Serving Institutions) are eligible to
apply for the program. The institutions must be within the United States or
U.S. Territories. Applicants must be U.S. citizens and must earn and
maintain a minimum 3.2 grade point average on a 4.0 scale.

The Ernest F. Hollings Scholarship Program provides scholarships for two
years of undergraduate study with a paid internship at a NOAA facility
during the interim summer session. A stipend and housing allowance is
provided. Applicants must be U.S. citizens enrolled full-time at an
accredited college or university. Applicants also must have and maintain a
declared major in a discipline including, but not limited to, oceanic,
environmental, biological, and atmospheric sciences; mathematics;
engineering; remote-sensing technology; physical and social sciences
including geography, physics, hydrology, geomatics; or teacher education
that supports NOAA’s programs and mission. Participants must earn and
maintain a minimum 3.0 grade point average on a 4.0 scale.

Applications for both scholarship programs are due Jan. 29, 2016.

For more information, visit
http://www.oesd.noaa.gov/scholarships/.

Please direct questions about these scholarship opportunities to
StudentScholarshipPrograms@noaa.gov.

[ANS thanks the NASA Education Express Message — Dec. 30, 2015 for the above
information]

———————————————————————

Tim Peake Sandringham School UK Contact

The first UK Amateur Radio school contact by UK astronaut Tim Peake GB1SS from
the International Space Station (ISS) will take place on Friday, January 8,
2016 at 0847 GMT with students at Sandringham School, St. Albans in
Hertfordshire. The school will use the call sign GB1SAN.

The St. Albans based Verulam Amateur Radio Club (VARC) ran an Amateur Radio
Foundation License course in December. Three of the candidates were pupils from
Sandringham School who took the course in preparation for the contact with Tim
Peake.

ARISS UK will provide and set up all necessary radio equipment (for example,
low earth orbit satellite tracking antennas and radios) to establishing a fully
functional, direct radio link with the International Space Station from the
school premises. In a ten-minute window when the ISS will be over the UK, an
amateur radio contact will be established with Tim, and students will be able
to ask him questions about his life and work on board the ISS.

Tim will use a frequency of 145.800 MHz FM for the contact and his signal
should be receivable across the British Isles and Europe.

What equipment do you need to hear the ISS?

Almost any 144 MHz FM transceiver will receive the ISS; you can even use a
general coverage VHF scanner with an external antenna. As far as the antenna is
concerned the simpler the better. A ¼ wave ground plane can give good results
because it has a high angle of radiation. Large 2m colinears don’t work quite
as well because the radiation pattern is concentrated at the horizon.

You can receive the ISS using a 144 MHz hand-held outdoors with its helical
antenna but a 1/4 wave whip will give far better results.

In the UK we use narrow 2.5 kHz deviation FM but the ISS transmits on 145.800
MHz with the wider 5 kHz deviation used in much of the world. Most rigs can be
switched been wide and narrow deviation FM filters so select the wider filter.
Hand-held rigs all seem to have a single wide filter fitted as standard.

The International Space Station is traveling around the Earth at over 28,000
km/h. This high speed makes radio signals appear to shift in frequency, a
phenomenon called Doppler Shift. When the ISS is approaching your location the
signal may be 3.5 kHz higher in frequency on 145.8035 MHz. During the 10 minute
pass the frequency will gradually move lower reaching 145.7965 MHz as the ISS
goes out of range. To get maximum signal you ideally need a radio that tunes in
1 kHz or smaller steps to follow the shift but in practice acceptable results
are obtained with the radio left on 145.800 MHz.

ISS Amateur Radio Stations

There are two amateur radio stations available to astronauts on the ISS.

The Russian Service Module has a dual-band Kenwood TM-D710 transceiver (this
replaced the older TM-D700). Four antennas are available, three of which are
identical and each can support both transmit and receive operations on 2m,
70cm, L band and S band. They also support reception for the Russian Glisser TV
system, which is used during spacewalks. The fourth antenna is a 2.5 m long
vertical whip that can be used to support High Frequency (HF) operations
although at the present time there is no amateur HF equipment.

The ESA Columbus Module has two Ericsson M-PA series FM 5 watt handheld
radios, one for 145, and the other for 435 MHz, as well as the 2.4 GHz HamTV
Digital Amateur Television Transmitter. Antennas are available for 145 and 435
MHz for the Ericsson handhelds; additionally, there are 1260 and 2400 MHz
antennas for the HamTV system.

Tim Peake will the using the equipment in the ESA Columbus Module.

The ISS HamTV will not be available for the Sandringham School contact because
the equipment will be turned off to permit other experiments.

You’ll be able to listen online to Tim Peake GB1SS on the 145.800 MHz FM
downlink by using the SUWS WebSDR radio at
http://websdr.suws.org.uk/

Tim Peake ISS School Contacts Announced
Tim Peake ISS School Contacts Announced

Sandringham School
http://www.sandringham.herts.sch.uk/

Twitter:
https://twitter.com/SandringhamSch1

Verulam Amateur Radio Club
http://www.verulam-arc.org.uk/

What is Amateur Radio?

What is Amateur Radio?

Find an amateur radio training course near you
https://thersgb.org/services/coursefinder/

ARISS
http://www.ariss-eu.org/

[ANS thanks ARISS & AMSAT-UK for the above information]

———————————————————————

AMSAT Events

Information about AMSAT activities at other important events around
the country. Examples of these events are radio club meetings where
AMSAT Area Coordinators give presentations, demonstrations of working
amateur satellites, and hamfests with an AMSAT presence (a table with
AMSAT literature and merchandise, sometimes also with presentations,
forums, and/or demonstrations).

*Saturday, 9 January 2016 – Thunderbird Hamfest 2016 in Phoenix AZ

*Friday and Saturday, 19-20 February 2016 – Yuma Hamfest and 2016 ARRL
Southwest Division Convention in Yuma AZ

*Saturday and Sunday, 12-13 March 2016 – ScienceCity science fair, on
the University of Arizona campus in Tucson AZ

*Saturday, 19 March 2016 – Scottsdale Amateur Radio Club Spring
Hamfest 2016 in Scottsdale AZ

*Saturday, 26 March 2016 – Tucson Spring Hamfest in Tucson AZ

[ANS thanks AMSAT-NA for the above information]

———————————————————————

ARISS News

Upcoming Contacts

Frederick W. Harnett Middle School, Blackstone, Massachusetts, telebridge
via K6DUE
The ISS callsign is presently scheduled to be NA1SS
The scheduled astronaut is Timothy Peake KG5BVI
Contact is a go for: Tue 2016-01-05 17:42:06 UTC 81 deg

Sandringham School, St. Albans, Hertfordshire, UK, direct via GB1SAN
The ISS callsign is presently scheduled to be GB1SS
The scheduled astronaut is Timothy Peake KG5BVI
Contact is a go for: Fri 2016-01-08 08:47:47 UTC 83 deg.

Watch
http://www.ariss.org/upcoming-contacts.html
for information about upcoming contacts as they are scheduled.

[ANS thanks ARISS, and Charlie, AJ9N for the above information]

———————————————————————

/EX

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the
President’s Club. Members of the President’s Club, as sustaining
donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive addi-
tional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT
Office.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership
at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students
enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the stu-
dent rate for a maximum of 6 post-secondary years in this status.
Contact Martha at the AMSAT Office for additional student membership
information.

73,
This week’s ANS Editor,
Joe Spier, K6WAO
k6wao at amsat dot org

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE
ANS-361

The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and infor-
mation service of AMSAT North America, The Radio Amateur Satellite
Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in Space
including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur
Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building,
launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio
satellites.

The news feed on http://www.amsat.org publishes news of Amateur
Radio in Space as soon as our volunteers can post it.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to:
ans-editor at amsat.org.

In this edition:

* Fox-1Cliff and -1D Matching Contribution Offer
* AMSAT SKN on OSCAR 2016 This Week
* ARISS Celebrates 15 Years of School Contact
* AMSAT Awards
* EO-79 Transponder Activation
* NASA Commercial Crew Program 2016 Children’s Artwork Calendar

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-361.01
ANS-340 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 361.01
From AMSAT HQ Kensington, MD.
December 27, 2015
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-361.01

Fox-1Cliff and -1D Matching Contribution Offer

Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays to AMSAT members and satellite enthusiasts
everywhere!

In this season of giving, we’ve had a generous offer for matching funds up to
$1,000 for those that contribute to the Fox-1Cliff and -1D crowdsourcing
campaign at https://fundrazr.com/campaigns/6pz92/ab/561Zd between now and
December 31st. Make your donation twice as valuable by taking advantage of this
opportunity and contributing before the end of the year, and help AMSAT fund the
launch of the next two satellites in the Fox-1 series.

Slated for launch in 2016 on the inaugural Spaceflight SHERPA mission aboard a
SpaceX Falcon 9, Fox-1Cliff and -1D carry university experiments from
Pennsylvania State-Erie, Vanderbilt, University of Iowa, cameras provided by
Virginia Tech, as well as amateur radio voice repeaters capable of U/V or L/V
operation.

Donations of $100 or more are eligible for a special AMSAT Fox challenge coin,
and $1,000 or more qualifies for a plaque with an actual solar panel cover from
Fox-1Cliff or -1D. (We’ve nearly exhausted our coin supply and are waiting on
resupply from the mint. Plaques will be distributed sometime after spacecraft
integration. Please be patient for delivery of either premium.)

AMSAT is a 501-(c)-(3) not-for-profit educational and scientific organization of
amateur radio operators whose purpose is to design, construct, launch, and
operate satellites in space and to provide the support needed to encourage
amateurs to utilize these resources. Please consider a tax-deductible
contribution to AMSAT to help underwrite the development and launch expenses of
our Fox satellite program.

Donors wishing to provide additional matching funds please contact Drew
Glasbrenner, KO4MA at ko4ma@amsat.org.

[ANS thanks Drew, KO4MA, for the above information]

———————————————————————

AMSAT SKN on OSCAR 2016 This Week

You are cordially invited to participate in Straight Key Night on OSCAR 2016,
sponsored by AMSAT for all radio amateurs throughout the world.

Operate CW through any amateur satellite from 0001 through 2400 UTC on 1 January
2016, using a manual, non-electronic key. Note that bugs are now allowed, as
they are in similar ARRL and SKCC events.

There is no need to send in a log, but please nominate someone you worked for
Best Fist. Your nominee need not have the best fist of those you heard, just of
those you worked. Send your nomination to w2rs@amsat.org.. A list of those
nominated will be published in early February.

This year’s event is being held in memory of Ben Stevenson, W2BXA (1914-2011).
Licensed since 1929, Ben was one of the world’s top DXers on both HF and
satellites. He led the DXCC Honor Roll for many years, and among his many
awards were Satellite DXCC No. 1 and post-war Worked All Zones No. 1. Founding
president of the North Jersey DX Association, Ben shared his knowledge and
enthusiasm with one and all.

[ANS thanks Ray, W2RS, for the above information]

———————————————————————

ARISS Celebrates 15 Years of School Contacts

15 years ago today, on December 21, 2000, students at Burbank School in
Burbank Illinois, U.S.A. lined us and readied themselves for a very historic
event—the first school contact with the crew on the International Space
Station. ARISS mentor and radio operator Charlie Sufana, AJ9N and his team
of volunteers had aptly prepared the students, teachers and the public in
attendance for their historic contact. As AOS approached, Charlie began
calling NA1SS. Soon, Expedition 1 Commander Bill “Shep” Shepherd, KD5CDL
answered back and the students immediately began asking Shep their
questions. The rest is history.

Burbank school teacher, Rita Wright, who later became KC9CDL, continues to
be active in ARISS as a volunteer. Rita’s 2004 AMSAT Symposium paper,
“Remember, We’re Pioneers!” chronicles the Burbank school’s journey to the
first ARISS contact and beyond. You are invited to download the paper at
https://www.dropbox.com/s/q8cmd0eu9y0imsz/REMEMBER–Burbank%20School.pdf?dl=0

With this historic event in mind, I would like to take this opportunity to
thank our volunteers from the ARISS operations team for their outstanding,
long term support to ARISS. These folks—our mentors, telebridge operators
and operations leaders—are the foundation of ARISS. They have made
nearly 1000 ARISS contacts successful since Burbank, 15 years ago. Without
them, the goals of ARISS: inspiration, exploration, education and
experimentation, could not be achieved. Their guidance, mentoring and
presentations, before, during and after the contact were crucial in
achieving these goals. Thank you all!!

As the ARISS team prepares for 2016, with many schools in the queue,
prepared, ready and waiting for their upcoming contacts, ARISS is gearing up
for another historic event—our 1000th school contact. Wow! 1000 ARISS
contacts!! To celebrate this historic event, I would ask those that know of
an ARISS student that has graduated and is now in a science, technology,
engineering or mathematics (STEM) field to please have them share their
story with us. Please pass this along to others and have them send their
stories to me at ka3hdo at verizon.net or to our web master at ariss at
arrl.org.

We would like to compile these for our space agency customers and to share
the stories with the amateur radio community.

[ANS thanks Frank, KA3HDO, for the above information]

———————————————————————

AMSAT Awards

Here are our newest award recipients and end of the year finale.
Happy Holidays and Good DX to all

AMSAT Satellite Communicators Award
Adrian Liggins, VA3NNA
John Pate, W1XQ
Mission Bay ARC, KM3RKI
Jim Leahy, N0VVV

——
AMSAT Communication Achievement Award

Fernando Ramirez-Ferrer, NP4JV #568

——
AMSAT Sexagesimal Award

Clayton Coleman, W5PFG #172

——
AMSAT Robert W. Barbee Jr., W4AMI Award
Frank Westphal, K6FW #84 1,000 contacts
John Papay, K8YSE/7 #85 1,000 contacts

——
AMSAT South Africa Communication Achievement Award
Fernando Ramirez-Ferrer, NP4JV #US196

To see all the awards visit http://www.amsat.org or
http://www.amsatnet.com/awards.html

Bruce Paige, KK5DO
AMSAT Director Contests and Awards

[ANS thanks Bruce, KK5DO, for the above information]

———————————————————————

EO-79 Transponder Activation

On December 21, 2015 at 1038 UT, the EO-79 transponder was turned on for a
prolonged period.

The FUNcube transponder subsystem on QB50p1 (EO-79) had been provided by AMSAT-
UK and AMSAT-NL and is a similar subsystem as on FUNcube-1, but without the
telemetry downlink circuitry.

The current software running on EO-79 does experience occasional reboots. When
these reboots happen, the transponder is automatically turned off and will have
to be turned back on by a command station. The FUNcube team has selected a few
command stations to do so, but be advised the transponder may be off.

TLEs:
AMSAT keps name: EO-79
Celestrak keps Name: QB50P1
Celestrak file: cubesat.txt
NORAD # 40025
COSPAR designator 2014-033-R

Frequencies:
*Uplink:* 435.035-435.065 MHz LSB [See note below]
*Downlink:* 145.935-145.965 MHz USB

EO-79 has been set to only beacon the normal AX.25 beacon every 30 seconds
instead of 10 seconds. The beacon frequency is 145.815 MHz and consists of AX.25
frames on BPSK. More details about the downlink can be found on the ISIS Ham
Radio page at http://isispace.nl/HAM/qb50p.html

We kindly request you to share your experiences with the AMSAT Bulletin Board so
everyone can benefit from operating tips and tricks, as well as being up-to-date
on the status.

We would also welcome any observation related to the transponder behaviour when
the AX.25 beacon comes on.

Just like FUNcube-1, the crystal oscillator circuits exhibit drift with
temperature. This means manual tuning will probably work best.

Mike Seguin N1JEZ notes: I found my downlink after setting my uplink +12 kHz
from published spec

SatPC32 tracking software Doppler SQF information used by Peter VK4NBL:
EO-79,145950,435063,USB,LSB,REV,0,0
EO-79,145814.8,435070,CW,TELEMETRY,0,0

Lastly, the commanding team will not be available over Christmas, so the current
activations are planned from today until Thursday 24th and from Monday 28th
until Thursday 31st

[ANS thanks Wouter, PA3WEG, and AMSAT-UK for the above information]

———————————————————————

NASA Commercial Crew Program 2016 Children’s Artwork Calendar

Some of the best works of art come from children who are only limited by
their imaginations, like the more than 150 young explorers from across the
country who submitted artwork depicting human spaceflight as they see it.
Sixteen masterpieces were chosen to be included in the NASA Commercial Crew
Program 2016 Children’s Artwork Calendar, which is now available for
download in PDF format, at http://go.nasa.gov/1NVTww4. We offer a huge
“thank you!” to all the explorers, ranging in age from four to 12, who
submitted their work and hope that everyone will enjoy and use this calendar
next year.

[ANS thanks the NASA Commercial Crew Program for the above information]

/EX

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the
President’s Club. Members of the President’s Club, as sustaining
donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive addi-
tional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT
Office.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership
at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students
enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the stu-
dent rate for a maximum of 6 post-secondary years in this status.
Contact Martha at the AMSAT Office for additional student membership
information.

73,
This week’s ANS Editor,
Lee McLamb, KU4OS
ku4os at amsat dot org

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE
ANS-354

The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and infor-
mation service of AMSAT North America, The Radio Amateur Satellite
Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in Space
including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur
Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building,
launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio
satellites.

The news feed on http://www.amsat.org publishes news of Amateur
Radio in Space as soon as our volunteers can post it.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to:
ans-editor at amsat.org.

In this edition:

* Special Membership Offer for Fox-1A launch expiring December 31
* 17 US Schools Move Forward Into the Next Stage of ARISS Selection
* ARISS Commemorative Event Update
* SA AMSAT Kletskous Cubesat Invites School Experiments to Fly to
Space
* Slow Scan TV Image Sent Through AO-85
* Yuri, UT1FG/MM, Itinerary During Trip Up the St. Lawrence River
* Unscheduled Spacewalk Likely on Monday
* SME-SAT video
* Look Up and Spot the Station! Learn More With STEM on Station
* NASA’s Digital Learning Network Seeking Participants for
International Event
* Now Accepting Applications for NASA Summer Internships
* ARISS News
* Satellite Shorts From All Over

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-354.01
ANS-354 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 354.01
From AMSAT HQ KENSINGTON, MD.
December 20, 2015
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-354.01

Special Membership Offer for Fox-1A launch expiring December 31

We’ve welcomed dozens of new members since the AO-85 launch with our
offer of “Getting Started With The Amateur Satellites” as a free PDF
with membership in AMSAT, but this offer will come to an end on
December 31st, 2015. Point your browser to
http://store.amsat.org/catalog/index.php?cPath=32 and help AMSAT keep
amateur radio in space, and get a free e-book as a thank you.

From http://www.amsat.org/?p=4591

AMSAT’s Fox-1A is set to launch as part of the GRACE (Government
Rideshare Advanced Concepts Experiment) auxillary payload on the NROL-
55 mission October 8, 2015 from Vandenburg AFB on an Atlas V vehicle.
More details will be released when made available from our launch
provider. NRO has released this factsheet about the mission:
http://www.amsat.org/wordpress/wp-
content/uploads/2015/10/GRACE_CubeSat_FactSheet.pdf

General information on Fox-1A is available in the downloadable
AMSAT Fox Operating Guide http://www.amsat.org/wordpress/wp-
content/uploads/2015/05/FoxOperatingGuide_May2015_Hi.pdf

(Editor’s Note: The above two links were truncated to in order to fit
required editorial format standards. Please copy and paste complete
link, without spaces, into your browser of choice to view the
information)

FoxTelem software for decoding and submitting telemetry has been
made available for download at http://www.amsat.org/?page_id=4532

As part of the preparations for the launch and activation of this
new satellite, AMSAT is making our “Getting Started With The Amateur
Satellites” book available for a limited time as a download with any
paid new or renewal membership purchased via the AMSAT Store. This
offer is only available with purchases completed online, and for only
a limited time. A perennial favorite, Getting Started is updated
every year with the latest amateur satellite information, and is the
premier primer of satellite operation. The 132 page book is presented
in PDF format, in full color, and covers all aspects of making your
first contacts on a ham radio satellite.

Please take advantage of this offer today by visiting the AMSAT
store (http://store.amsat.org/catalog/) and selecting any membership
option. While there, check out our other items, including the M2
LEOpack antenna system, AMSAT shirts, hats, and other swag. Thank
you, and see you soon on Fox-1A!

[ANS thanks Drew KO4MA for the above information]

———————————————————————

17 US Schools Move Forward Into the Next Stage of ARISS Selection

Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation (AMSAT) and the

American Radio Relay League (ARRL), US managing partners of Amateur
Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS), are pleased to
announce the schools/organizations selections for the second half of
2016. A total of 17 of the submitted proposals during the recent
proposal window have been accepted to move forward into the next
stage of planning to host a scheduled amateur radio contact with crew
on the ISS during the July through December period of 2016. This is a
significant step in ARISS’ continuing effort to engage young people
in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) activities and
raise their awareness of space exploration, space communications and
related areas of study and career possibilities.

The ARISS program anticipates that NASA will be able to provide
scheduling opportunities for these US host organizations during the
July – December 2016 time period. These 17 schools/organizations must
now complete an acceptable equipment plan that demonstrates their
ability to execute the ham radio contact. Once theirequipment plan is
approved by the ARISS technical team, the final selected
schools/organizations will be scheduled as their availability and
flexibility match up with the scheduling opportunities offered by
NASA.

The schools and organizations are:

Boca Raton Christian School Boca Raton, FL
The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis Indianapolis, IN
Frontiers of Flight Museum’s “Moon Day 2016” Dallas, TX
Howell L. Watkins Middle School Palm Beach Gardens, FL
iSPACE Cincinnati, OH
John Glenn Middle School Maplewood, MN
Kopernik Observatory &Science Center Vestal, NY
Lawrence Public Library Lawrence, KS
Museum of Innovation and Science Schenectady, NY
Northland Preparatory Academy Flagstaff, AZ
Peoria Riverfront Museum Peoria, IL
University of Nebraska’s Peter Kiewit Institute Omaha, NE
South Street School Danbury, CT
Space Jam 10 Rantoul, IL
United Space School Seabrook, TX
U.S. Space & Rocket Center Huntsville, AL
World Genesis Foundation (WGF) Goodyear, AZ

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) is a
cooperative venture of the Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation
(AMSAT), the American Radio Relay League (ARRL) and the National
Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in the United States, and
other international space agencies and international amateur radio
organizations around the world. The primary purpose of ARISS is to
organize scheduled contacts via amateur radio between crew members
aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and classrooms or
informal education venues. With the help of experienced amateur radio
volunteers from amateur radio clubs and coordination from the ARISS
team, the ISS crew members speak directly with large group audiences
in a variety of public forums such as school assemblies, science
centers and museums, Scout camporees, jamborees and space camps,
where students, teachers, parents, and communities learn about space,
space technologies and Amateur Radio. Find more information at
www.ariss.org, www.amsat.org and www.arrl.org.

[ANS thanks ARISS, The ARRL and AMSAT for the above information]

———————————————————————

ARISS Commemorative Event Update

ARISS is celebrating its 15th anniversary of continuous operations
on the ISS. On November 13, 2000 the crew conducted their first ham
radio contacts on ISS and then on December 21, 2000 ARISS conducted
their first school contact with the Burbank School in Burbank,
Illinois.

An SSTV commemoration of these historic events is in the planning for
December 26 and 27. The transmission mode will be PD120 instead of
the P180 mode used in the past. This will allow for more pictures to
be transmitted per pass. ARISS is also investigating the possibility
of a repeat of the event in January.

Pictures for transmission are currently under review and will be
images that commemorate 15 years of school contacts using Amateur
Radio on the International Space Station.

Please note that the event, and any ARISS event, is dependent on
other activities, schedules and crew responsibilities on the ISS and
are subject to change at any time.

While preparations are being finalized please check for new and the
most current information on the AMSAT.org and ARISS.org web sites and
the AMSAT-BB for the latest information on this event and others that
ARISS plans to conduct over the next few months

[ANS thanks ARISS for the above information]

———————————————————————

SA AMSAT Kletskous Cubesat Invites School Experiments to Fly to Space

SA AMSAT is inviting Southern African leaners and school science
groups to take their next science project into space on the first
amateur radio satellite being designed and built by radio amateurs in
South Africa. Named Kletskous (Afrikaans for Chatterbox) the CubeSat
will carry a linear transponder for communication between amateurs,
school science projects and a telemetry system.

Kletskous measures 10x10x10 cm and will be powered by solar panels.
Because of the small size, any science project to be considered for
inclusion in the satellite has to be small and consume the minimum of
power. The selected projects will be incorporated on one of the main
printed circuit boards and connected to the telemetry system. This
means that participants in the science projects will be able to
download their own telemetry and evaluate how their project is
performing and analysing the data collected inspace.

The telemetry stream will also be made available on the SA AMSAT web
pages giving access to the data to learners on the tablets and
laptops. The mission of the new satellite is to give radio amateurs
and educational institutions in Southern Africa easy access to a Low
Earth Orbit (LEO) satellite on as many of the available passes as
possible and thus stimulate interest and activity in space,
satellites and amateur radio. A secondary mission is to fly
scientific payloads proposed and designed by learners or school
science groups.

Kletskous will be using the two metre and 70 cm amateur bands. The
uplink is on 70 cm, and the downlink on 2 m. A linear transponder
with a bandwidth of 20 kHz is utilised for both FM and SSB. A sub-
carrier for a telemetry downlink will be included. For command and
control purposes a separate 70 cm frequency will be used. Currently
frequencies in the 435.100 to 435.140 MHz range are considered for
the uplink and 145.860 to 145.980 MHz for the downlink. The above
architecture will ensure that the transponder is accessible for
general use while the satellite is being commanded and controlled by
the ground station.

School science payloads are being encouraged that measure things
happening in space such the temperature inside or outside the
satellite, sounds in space, radiation particle count and many more.
Develop the project on a breadboard and test it on the bench, develop
software for the project and then write up a proposal with as much
information as possible. Include information about yourself or your
group, include any photographs and contact details such as telephone
number, email address, and physical location.

Email the proposal to saamsat@intekom.co.za

The closing date for proposal is 31 March 2016. Depending on the
type and scope of the proposal, SA AMSAT will make the final decision
and advise all entrants by 30 April 2016. Theentrants of the
successful project or projects will be invited to make a short
presentation at the 2016 SA AMSAT Space Symposium on 28 May 2016
planned to be held at the Innovation Hub in Pretoria.

The SA AMSAT CubeSat project is funded by donations. To contribute or
participate in the project see the SA AMSAT web page at:
http://www.amsatsa.org.za/

[ANS thanks SA AMSAT for the above information]

———————————————————————

Slow Scan TV Image Sent Through AO-85

On December 13 Brazilian radio amateur Roland, PY4ZBZ, received an
SSTV image sent in Robot 36 via AO-85.

AMSAT Vice President for Engineering Jerry Buxton, N0JY, said “I can
tell you that in South America, they are having some fun, and that
our analog-to-digital to analog IHU processing of the audio seems to
work very well at SSTV frequencies!” Buxton told ARRL. “I don’t know
who uplinked the signal, but it was a ground-satellite-ground
contact, nothing that originated on AO-85.”

Buxton went on to state that the transmission was “a very good
demonstration of the capability of the FM repeater on the Fox-1
series satellites.”

The FM satellite uplink is at 435.170 MHz (67 Hz CTCSS tone
required). The downlink is at 145.978 MHz. Both frequencies are
subject to Doppler shift.

Whereas is it not recommended to use satellites to transmit SSTV
images this personal experiment by South American hams didn’t seem to
interfere with any other transmissions. AMSAT VP of Operations Drew
Glasbrenner KO4MA stated “At some point we will set up a period to try
it over the US, but until then please refrain from repeating this
experiment.”

[ANS thanks AMSAT, Jerry, N0JY, and Drew KO4MA for the above
information]

———————————————————————

UT1FG/MM Itinerary During Trip Up the St. Lawrence River

Yuri, UT1FG/MM, is heading up to the St. Lawrence and Montreal and
will visit two ports there. He has shared a list of grids that he
will likely travel through. Some of these grids have not been
previously activated, however, keep in mind that not every grid will
be workable due to the timing of the available satellite passes. He
may be in some of these grids for a very short time.

FL17 FL18 FL28 FL29

FM20 FM30 FM31 FM32 FM42 FM43 FM53
FM54 FM55 FM56 FM66 FM67 FM68 FM78 FM79 FM89

FN80 FN81 FN82 FN83 FN93 FN94 FN95

GN05 GN06 GN07

FN97 FN98 FN88 FN89 FN79 FN69 FN58 FN57 FN47 FN46 FN36 FN35

The ship is the Barnacle, a vessel on which he has previously sailed.

[ANS thanks John K8YSE for the above iformation]

———————————————————————

Unscheduled Spacewalk Likely on Monday

Impacts that the amateur radio on the ISS will not return to service
until after the EVA.

The International Space Station’s mission managers are preparing for
a likely unplanned spacewalk by Astronauts Scott Kelly and Tim Kopra
no earlier than Monday, Dec. 21.

Late Wednesday, the Mobile Transporter rail car on the station’s
truss was being moved by robotic flight controllers at Mission
Control, Houston, to a different worksite near the center of the
truss for payload operations when it stopped moving. The cause of the
stall is being evaluated, but experts believe it may be related to a
stuck brake handle, said ISS Mission Integration and Operations
Manager Kenny Todd. Flight controllers had planned to move the
transporter away from the center of the truss to worksite 2. The
cause of the stall that halted its movement just four inches (10
centimeters) away from where it began is still being evaluated.
Progress 62 is scheduled to launch at 3:44 a.m. EST Monday, and dock
on Wednesday to the Pirs docking compartment at 5:31 a.m. Wednesday.

The ISS Mission Management Team met Friday morning and is targeting
Monday for the spacewalk, but will meet again in a readiness review
Sunday morning. Managers could elect to press ahead for Monday, or
take an extra day and conduct the spacewalk Tuesday.

ISS Expedition 46 Commander Scott Kelly and Flight Engineer Tim
Kopra of NASA will conduct the spacewalk. It will be the 191st
spacewalk in support of space station assembly and maintenance, the
third in Kelly’s career and the second for Kopra. Kelly will be
designated Extravehicular Activity crew member 1 (EV1) wearing the
suit bearing the red stripes, and Kopra will be Extravehicular
Activity crew member 2 (EV2) wearing the suit with no stripes.

A start time for the spacewalk either Monday or Tuesday has not yet
been set, but NASA TV coverage will begin 90 minutes prior to the
start of the spacewalk.

For amateur radio enthusiats should note that the EVA impacts the
use of the amateur radio which will likely not return to service
until after the EVA.

[ANS thanks blogs.nasa.gov for the above information]

———————————————————————

SME-SAT video

The Surrey Space Centre in Guildford has released a ‘Softstack’
Integration time-lapse video of the SME-SAT CubeSat.

The mission objectives are:
A: Outreach – The satellite will provide beacons for which amateur
satellite users and ham radio users will be able to receive.

B: Space qualification and performance characterisation of sensors.
• High performance COTS Gyroscopes (x3).
• High precision MEMS accelerometers.
• 2 Aperture Star Camera, At a later point in the mission these will
be used in conjunction with the ADCS to characterise the closed loop
performance of the sensors.

C: Performance characterisation of Nano-Control Moment Gyros (CMGs)
for agility. The mission is equipped with 4-Nano-CMGs in a pyramid
configuration for ADCS. This part of the mission will evaluate the
performance of this system on the ADCS and agility of the satellite.

D: Space qualification and performance characterisation of the EPS
The EPS for this mission has heritage from the Delfi-C3 and other
missions and includes additional improvements to be demonstrated on
this mission.

E: Smart Thermal Radiation Devices (STRD tiles) SME-SAT is equipped
with a number of STRD tiles on the outside faces of the satellite for
passive thermal management of the internal structure.

F: Flux Gate Magnetometer The mission contains a scientific grade
miniaturized flux gate magnetometer that sits on the end of a
deployable boom to improve the performance of the sensor. This
payload will be switched into the ADCS for evaluation of performance
during parts of the mission but is not the primary magnetometer for
ADCS.

G: GPS SME-SAT also contains an experimental GPS system that will be
switched into the ADCS loop at stages in the orbit to evaluate the
performance of the system.

The IARU coordinated frequency for the satellite’s 9k6 RC-BPSK AX.25
downlink is 437.150 MHz.

More information here
http://www.surrey.ac.uk/ssc/research/onboarddata/smesat/index.htm

[ANS thanks AMSAT-UK for the above information]

———————————————————————

Look Up and Spot the Station! Learn More With STEM on Station

The International Space Station orbits 250 miles above Earth and
travels about 17,500 miles per hour. The space station is visible in
the night sky and looks like a fast-moving plane, but it is dozens of
times higher than any airplane and travels thousands of miles an hour
faster.

Learn more about how you can spot the space station and other ways
you can bring the station into your classroom by visiting NASA’s STEM
on Station website. While you are there, stop by and learn more about
the yearlong mission and how it is helping us on our #JourneytoMars.
Opportunities, resources and more await at this space-station-focused
site!

To check out the website, visit
http://www.nasa.gov/education/STEMstation.

[ANS thanks the NASA Education Express Message — Dec. 17, 2015 for
the above information]

———————————————————————

NASA’s Digital Learning Network Seeking Participants for
International Event

In February 2016, NASA’s Digital Learning Network is teaming up with
The Royal Institution and Faraday Studios for a series of Google
Hangout events in connection with British astronaut Tim Peake’s
mission to the International Space Station. The live hourlong events
will include selected classrooms from the United Kingdom and the U.S.
These classes will pose questions to Dr. Kevin Fong (author of
“Extreme Medicine”), Dr. Steven Jacobs (Mr. Wizard) and NASA experts.
The events will be broadcast live on YouTube.

The DLN currently is seeking U.S. middle and high schools (grades 5-
12) that would be interested in participating in these events
interactively with our U.K. partners.

Schools, if selected, would be required to conduct a test call in
early January with a representative of the DLN to confirm
participation. If you would like to have your school considered,
please contact Caryn Long at caryn.long@nasa.gov. Inquiries must be
received no later than Dec. 21, 2015.

For more information about the lecture series, visit
http://www.nasa.gov/dln/opportunities/.

To learn more about NASA’s Digital Learning Network, visit
http://www.nasa.gov/dln.

[ANS thanks the NASA Education Express Message — Dec. 17, 2015 for
the above information]

———————————————————————

Now Accepting Applications for NASA Summer Internships

Now is your chance to apply for exciting hands-on summer internship
opportunities available at all NASA centers. High school,
undergraduate and graduate students are needed to help NASA
scientists and engineers with ongoing scientific and engineering
research, technology development and spaceflight operations
activities. Internship opportunities also exist in nontechnical areas
such as communications, budget, procurement, education and human
resources. NASA internships are stipend-paid and offer students
mentor-directed, degree-related, real-time tasks. If you think you
have what it takes to be part of NASA’s Journey to Mars, please visit
https://intern.nasa.gov today to apply or to learn more about the
numerous opportunities available to you.

The deadline for summer applications is March 1, 2016!

Please submit inquiries about the NASA Internships, Fellowships, and
Scholarships One Stop Shopping Initiative, or NIFS OSSI, via
https://intern.nasa.gov/oic/.

[ANS thanks the NASA Education Express Message — Dec. 17, 2015 for
the above information]

———————————————————————

ARISS News

From 2015-12-20 to 2016-01-04, there will be no US Operational
Segment (USOS) hams on board ISS. So any schools contacts during this
period will be conducted by the ARISS Russia team.

Look for SSTV image downlinks to commemorate ARISS’ 15 years of
school contacts on the ISS on December 26 and 27 (subject to change)
See related story above.

An EVA that needs to be scheduled to fix a problem with the mobile
transporter cart, will most likely mean that the the amateur radio on
the ISS will remail off until after after the EVA.
http://tinyurl.com/ANS354-ISS-EVA

[ANS thanks ARISS, Charlie AJ9N and David AA4KN for the above
information]

———————————————————————

Satellite Shorts From All Over

+ Fox-1A Operating Guide – updated with post launch information. A Hi-
resolution PDF for hard copy printing is available.

Station and Operating Hints

Hamfest brochure introducing AMSAT – trifold, print double-sided
http://tinyurl.com/ANS354-AMSAT-Trifold

[ANS thanks JoAnne K9JKM for the above information]

+ New ISS SSTV Video and “ISS SSTV Reception Hints” webpage

To help promote the tentative December 26th International Space
Station Slow Scan TV event (and others that are planned over the next
year) John Brier, KG4AKV, made a new video of an ISS SSTV reception
that he filmed last April. He also made an extensive webpage with
information, resources, and hints on receiving ISS SSTV events,
including the upcoming ones.

Video: My First Perfect ISS SSTV Image!

Webpage: ISS SSTV Reception Hints
ISS SSTV Reception Hints

+ NASA Commercial Crew Program 2016 Children’s Artwork Calendar

Some of the best works of art come from children who are only
limited by their imaginations, like the more than 150 young explorers
from across the country who submitted artwork depicting human
spaceflight as they see it. Sixteen masterpieces were chosen to be
included in the NASA Commercial Crew Program 2016 Children’s Artwork
Calendar, which is now available for download in PDF format, at
http://go.nasa.gov/1NVTww4. We offer a huge “thank you!” to all the
explorers, ranging in age from four to 12, who submitted their work
and hope that everyone will enjoy and use this calendar next year.

[ANS thanks the NASA Commercial Crew Program for the above
information]

———————————————————————

/EX

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the
President’s Club. Members of the President’s Club, as sustaining
donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive addi-
tional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT
Office.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership
at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students
enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the stu-
dent rate for a maximum of 6 post-secondary years in this status.
Contact Martha at the AMSAT Office for additional student membership
information.

73,
This week’s ANS Editor,
EMike McCardel, KC8YLD
kc8yld at amsat dot org

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE
ANS-347
The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and infor-
mation service of AMSAT North America, The Radio Amateur Satellite
Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in Space
including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur
Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building,
launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio
satellites.

The news feed on http://www.amsat.org publishes news of Amateur
Radio in Space as soon as our volunteers can post it.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to:
ans-editor at amsat.org.

In this edition:

* Upcoming ARISS Commemorative SSTV Event mid to late December
* STMSat-1 has made it to the Space Station
* ATVQ Magazine Documents Mir SSTV History
* Commemorative ANZAC Operations Include Satellite Activation
* UK students to have direct contact with astronaut Tim Peake during Principia
mission
* NASA TV to cover launch of Tim Peake KG5BVI
* WRC-15: Amateur Bands Unsuitable for Non-Amateur Satellites
* AMSAT Events
* ARISS News
* Satellite Shorts From All Over

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-347.01
ANS-347 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 347.01
>From AMSAT HQ KENSINGTON, MD.
DATE December 13, 2015
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-347.01

———————————————————————

Upcoming ARISS Commemorative SSTV Event mid to late December

On November 13, 2000 the crew conducted their first ham radio contacts on ISS
and on December 21, 2000 ARISS conducted their first school contact with the
Burbank School in Burbank, Illinois.

An SSTV commemoration of these historic events is tentatively planned for mid
to late December. It is possible that the transmission mode will be P120
instead of the P180 mode used in the past. This would allow for more pictures
to be transmitted per pass.

More information at
http://www.ariss.org/
when available

[ANS thanks ARISS & Trevor, M5AKA for the above information]

———————————————————————

STMSat-1 has made it to the ISS

Cygnus cargo vessel carrying STMSat-1 has made it to the space station! At
6:19am Wednesday morning, the Space Station robotic arm grasped the ORB-4 cargo
element and mated it to the ISS.

The ISS will be it’s home until on or about February 15th. On or about that
day, the STMSat-1 will be launched with other CubeSats via a pea pod ejector
and launched into low earth orbit. At that point, the timer starts for the
programmed deployment of the antennas, the solar array, and the earth
observation camera. Godspeed STMSat-1. Please open the link below for
additional information on the events of the day.

http://spaceflightnow.com/2015/12/09/u-s-resupply-of-space-station-
successfully-resumes/

http://jewelbots.tumblr.com/post/134465599599/how-did-400-grade-school-students-built-a


students-built-a

[ANS thanks AMSAT-UK & Spaceflightnow.com for the above information]

———————————————————————

ATVQ Magazine Documents Mir SSTV History

December 12 marked the 17th anniversary of the beginning of the MIR SSTV
Station which was active in sending pictures over a period of about 2 years
and 4 months. For those interested in this historical event and would like
more background information, the Spring, 2015 issue of the Amateur
Television Quarterly Magazine (ATVQ), has an article, “How Did Mir SSTV come
into Existence?”

Back issue copies of ATVQ and cyber copies of the article are available
on-line at
http://www.atvquarterly.com/
or by contacting ATVQ via e-mail at
WA6SVT@aol.com.

[ANS thanks Farrell Winder, W8ZCF, for the above information]

———————————————————————

Commemorative ANZAC Operations Include Satellite Activation

The ANZAC 100 program has entered its “last hurrah” phase, with plenty of on
air action now as ANZAC-suffixed callsigns commemorate the departure from
Gallipoli on December 20, 1915.

The multi-mode event by VI3ANZAC is in full swing, headed by Tony Hambling
VK3VTH.

In honor of the Royal Australian Navy Bridge Train, a large team lead by
Mike Charteris VK4QS is being heard through VI4ANZAC.

In the west VI6ANZAC organized by Chris Grice VK6PII has members of the Ham
College. The major operations are this weekend at the RAAF Museum Bull Creek
in the Cobra Helicopter display, and next weekend at the Ham College new
shack in a scout hall. Chris VK6PII advises that VI6ANZAC will be on HF
using SSB and sometimes CW, and plans to activate an FM satellite as well.

While VI8ANZAC is now on air, and is to finish at the Charles Darwin
National Park with Stuie VK8NSB and Rowan VK8RD, heard on HF using SSB & CW.

More details of each of these events are on the WIA website, wia.org.au

On next week’s broadcast we will conclude with the special closing address
from the WIA President, Phil Wait VK2ASD. That is expected to talk about the
significance of the ANZAC legend, and the highly successful WIA ANZAC 100
program that began with pre-cursors at Queenscliff, Darwin and Albany.

These have been 50 events in the past eight months, joined by commemorative
callsigns in Turkey and Belgium.

Now the ANZAC-suffixed callsigns “last hurrah” on air until December 20, are
working the world.

[ANS thanks the VK1WIA-news from the Wireless Institute of Australia for the
above information]

———————————————————————

UK students to have direct contact with astronaut Tim Peake during Principia
mission

Working with the UK Space Agency, ARISS (Amateur Radio on the International
Space Station) is giving a number of UK schools the opportunity to speak
directly to Tim Peake, the first British ESA astronaut, during his mission on
board the International Space Station (ISS). This will enable live interaction
between pupils and Tim and is anticipated to be one of the highlights of the
Principia STEM outreach program.

During his 6 month mission to the ISS, starting in December 2015, Tim will be
undertaking a wide range of science experiments, some of which have been
designed by students from around the UK. Additionally he has committed to take
part in a large range of educational outreach activities with schools and
colleges around the country.

Jeremy Curtis, Head of Education at the UK Space Agency, said:
“Both Tim’s space mission and amateur radio have the power to inspire young
people and encourage them into STEM subjects. By bringing them together we can
boost their reach and give young people around the UK the chance to be involved
in a space mission and a hands-on project that will teach them new skills.”

The pre-arranged schools contacts will take place between January and April
2016 and students will be able to put a number of questions directly to Tim
using amateur radio VHF and UHF radio equipment specially installed at the
school for the occasion.

The 3.8 meter dish owned by Satellite Applications Catapult is being loaned to
the project to track the ISS and will ensure real time video will be available
during the schools’ contacts scheduled for early next year. The dish is almost
in the shadow of the 29 meter dish “Arthur” built in 1962 to receive the first
transatlantic television signals from the Telstar-1 spacecraft.

For Tim Peake’s mission, the ARISS team of licensed UK Radio Amateurs is
planning a world first by also receiving live video from the ISS during the
contact. Using the HamTV transmitter, which has recently been commissioned on
board the ISS, Tim will be the first astronaut to use this equipment during a
two way schools contact.

As well as building a vehicle based receive system, which will be installed at
the school on the day of the contact, the team recently visited Goonhilly Earth
Station in Cornwall to commission a dish to receive the 2.4 GHz HamTV
transmissions from the ISS.

During the contact at the schools the ARISS team will be providing information
displays on the ISS position and have webcams showing both the local and
Goonhilly dishes as they track the ISS.

The hosting schools will be organizing presentations and displays before and
after the contact and the ARISS team will be providing a live web cast of all
the day’s events including the actual contact with Tim Peake.

The live event webcast will be hosted by the British Amateur Television Club
(BATC) on their web streaming service at
https://principia.ariss.org/live/

The ARISS program is designed to maximize the impact of the Principia
Mission outreach activities. It will directly engage students with media and
communication technologies with the goal of inspiring them to pursue careers in
Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths.

UK Space Agency Principia site
https://principia.org.uk/

School Shortlist for Tim Peake Space Station Contact
School Shortlist for Tim Peake Space Station Contact

NASA TV to cover launch of Tim Peake KG5BVI
NASA TV to cover launch of Tim Peake KG5BVI

[ANS thanks UK Space Agency, ARISS, & AMSAT-UK for the above information]

———————————————————————

NASA TV to cover launch of Tim Peake KG5BVI

The next three crew members bound for the International Space Station are set
to launch on Tuesday, December 15. NASA Television will provide full coverage
of the launch beginning at 10:00 UT.

UK astronaut Tim Peake KG5BVI, along with Yuri Malenchenko RK3DUP and Tim
Kopra KE5UDN, will launch from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan at 11:03
UT (5:03 p.m. Baikonur time) for a six-month stay on the orbital complex.

The three will travel in a Soyuz spacecraft, rendezvous with the space station
and dock to the Rassvet module at 17:24 UT NASA TV coverage of docking will
begin at 16:45 UT.

The hatches between the Soyuz and space station will be opened at about 19:25
UT, and the newly arrived crew members will be greeted by Expedition 46
Commander Scott Kelly of NASA and Flight Engineers Sergey Volkov RU3DIS and
Mikhail Kornienko RN3BF of Roscosmos. NASA TV coverage of the hatch opening
will begin at 19:00 UT.

Kelly and Kornienko will return in March 2016 with Volkov after spending a
year on the station collecting valuable biomedical data that will improve our
understanding of the effects of long duration space travel and aid in NASA’s
journey to Mars.

Together, the Expedition 46 crew members will continue the several hundred
experiments in biology, biotechnology, physical science and Earth science
currently underway and scheduled to take place aboard humanity’s only orbiting
laboratory.

For the full schedule of prelaunch, launch and docking coverage, visit:
http://www.nasa.gov/nasatv

Follow Tim Peake KG5BVI on Twitter at
https://twitter.com/astro_timpeake

Follow the space station crew members on Instagram and Twitter at:
http://instagram.com/iss
and
http://www.twitter.com/Space_Station

[ANS thanks NASA, ARISS, & AMSAT-UK for the above information]

———————————————————————

WRC-15: Amateur Bands Unsuitable for Non-Amateur Satellites

The World Radiocommunication Conference (WRC) held in Geneva during November
2015 has recommended an agenda for the next WRC, to be held in 2019, to the
Council of the International Telecommunication Union (ITU). One of the agenda
items is of particular interest to the small-satellite community.

Agenda item 1.7 for WRC-19 reads: “to study the spectrum needs for telemetry,
tracking and command in the space operation service for non-GSO satellites with
short duration missions, to assess the suitability of existing allocations to
the space operation service and, if necessary, to consider new allocations, in
accordance with Resolution COM6/19 (WRC-15).”

Resolution COM6/19, which eventually will be given a new number, specifies the
frequency ranges that may be considered for possible new allocations. They are
150.05-174 MHz and 400.15-420 MHz.

One of the factors that the conference considered in deciding on these
particular frequency ranges was “that some non-amateur satellites have used
frequencies for telemetry, tracking and command in the frequency bands 144-146
MHz and 435-438 MHz which are allocated to the amateur-satellite service, and
that such use is not in accordance with Nos. 1.56 and 1.57.” Those two
provisions of the ITU Radio Regulations define the amateur and amateur-
satellite services respectively.

The International Amateur Radio Union welcomed the exclusion from
consideration of all existing frequency allocations to the amateur and amateur-
satellite services. IARU President Tim Ellam, VE6SH, observed: “This is an
excellent result for the amateur services and clearly shows that non-amateur
satellite constructors need to consider spectrum other than the very limited
and congested segments that are available for amateur satellites at 144 MHz and
435 MHz.”

[ANS thanks IARU, ARRL, & AMSAT-UK for the above information]

———————————————————————

AMSAT Events

Information about AMSAT activities at other important events around
the country. Examples of these events are radio club meetings where
AMSAT Area Coordinators give presentations, demonstrations of working
amateur satellites, and hamfests with an AMSAT presence (a table with
AMSAT literature and merchandise, sometimes also with presentations,
forums, and/or demonstrations).

*Saturday, 9 January 2016 – Thunderbird Hamfest 2016 in Phoenix AZ

*Friday and Saturday, 19-20 February 2016 – Yuma Hamfest and 2016 ARRL
Southwest Division Convention in Yuma AZ

*Saturday and Sunday, 12-13 March 2016 – ScienceCity science fair, on
the University of Arizona campus in Tucson AZ

*Saturday, 19 March 2016 – Scottsdale Amateur Radio Club Spring
Hamfest 2016 in Scottsdale AZ

*Saturday, 26 March 2016 – Tucson Spring Hamfest in Tucson AZ

[ANS thanks AMSAT-NA for the above information]

———————————————————————

ARISS News

Successful Contacts

* A direct contact via 8N2YAYOI with students at Yayoi Elementary School,
Yatomi, Japan was successful Fri 2015-12-04 09:25:46 UTC 57 deg. Astronaut
Kimiya Yui KG5BPH and answered 14 questions prepared by students.

Watch a video of the contact which was conducted in Japanese at

* The telebridge contact with students at Dragonskolan, Umeå, Sweden was
rescheduled via LU1CGB for Fri 2015-12-04 10:15:01 UTC 72 deg. Astronaut Kjell
Lindgren, KO5MOS was able to answer 17 prepared questions for students.

The contact was recorded by the school. View it on the school website at:
http://www.skola.umea.se/dragonskolan

Dragonskolan is one of the biggest upper secondary schools in Sweden and is
located in central Umeå. Currently hosting 1820 students aged 16-19 and 300
staff; it has recently been renovated to meet modern needs in a stimulating
learning environment.
At Dragonskolan, we have an ethos where we believe we can offer our students
three meaningful and enjoyable years. Our core values are “open and bright”,
referring not only to the physical surroundings but also to the social climate.
Dragonskolan is the biggest meeting place for young people in Umeå,
A wide range of 3 year programs, college preparatory and vocational, are
offered here, ranging from natural science to humanities and technological
science.
At the core of the school is the Dragonskolan Technology Center where
everything is taught from industrial welding technology to electronics,
automation, computer science, CAD and much more.
With its close ties to the industry, the school keeps in pace with the latest
industrial technology ensuring the students get the best education available
within their chosen field.

* A direct contact with students at an event titled, “the development of
Gagarin from Space”, was sponsored by the Polytechnic Professional Councils of
the City of Grozny, Russia on Sat 2015-12-05 16:25 UTC. The cosmonaut for the
contact was Sergey Volkov RU3DIS.

* A telebridge contact via LU1CGB with students at Konstanty Ildefons
Galczynski Junior High School, Swietajno, Poland, was successful
Tue 2015-12-08 08:19:31 UTC 62 deg. Astronaut Kjell Lindgren KO5MOS answered
14 questions prepared by students.

An audio recording may be heard at:
http://www.ariss.org/news.html

Konstanty Ildefons Galczynski Junior High School in Swietajno,
attended by approximately 170 pupils (aged 13-15), is situated in a
picturesque Land of a Thousand Lakes in Szczytno County (Warmian-Masurian
Voivodeship, in the northeastern part of Poland. The school consists of seven
forms and it employs twenty well-qualified teachers. Mazurian Amateur Radio
Club SP4YWM has been established here and it functions with the number of
seventeen school members (among which there are three primary school pupils
and one pre-school girl, all from Swietajno).

In preparation for the amateur radio contact with the ISS, the students with
the guidance of their teachers improved their English, got familiar with the
life and work on the ISS. They had a great opportunity to learn everyday
English in order to ask an astronaut questions during the ISS contact as well
as the specialized language of science to visit space agencies pages. The
students learned geography with the use of modern technologies and photographed
the Earth from the camera on board the ISS (EarthKAM). The school cooperated
with the Olsztyn Planetarium to organize an observation. The planetarium
visited Swietajno to accompany one of the school events. Consequently, the
Astronomical Mobile Laboratory called Astrolabium was at the school’s disposal.
Last year the ARISS participants from Swietajno attended the 4th Polish-Wide
Conference of Contributors and Sympathisers in ARISS held in the central part
of Poland, where they focused on interesting topics concerning the ISS and
learned how other Polish schools had prepared for ARISS contacts in the past.

The pupils also performed an experiment in the near space as a part of the
miniSAT project. They sent peas, bubble wrap and a watch to near space to the
altitude of about 30 000 meters above the Earth. The conditions differ
significantly between near space and the surface of the Earth: the pressure is
much smaller, UV radiation is higher and the temperature is below zero
degrees Celsius. People from all over Poland, including the pupils from
Swietajno, took part in it. The balloon used in the event was marked “CP26”.
The experiment in the near space was possible thanks to ham radio operators
and other volunteers from a non-governmental organization called Copernicus
Project Foundation (near Torun, Poland). Their two flagship projects are
MiniSAT and Near Space Program in Poland and they have organized above 30
balloon flies to the near space since 2005.

In March 2013 the school started public relations activities connected with
the ham radio contact between an astronaut on the International Space Station
and the students from Konstanty Ildefons Galczynski School. An official
inauguration of the ARISS program in Swietajno had been prepared. TVP Olsztyn,
Radio Olsztyn and other local mass media were present there and took part in
an inaugural lecture on ARISS. As a continuation of EarthKAM program an
exhibition of the photographs taken by the students was organized during the
inauguration. Before that, Swietajno primary school pupils (between the ages
of 5 and 12) had been invited to participate in the preparations to the ARISS
contact. As a result, some of them are going to ask the astronaut their
questions, together with their older friends from the junior high school.

Upcoming Contacts

From 2015-12-20 to 2016-01-04, there will be no US Operational Segment (USOS)
hams on board ISS. So any schools contacts during this period will be
conducted by the ARISS Russia team.

Watch
http://www.ariss.org/upcoming-contacts.html
for information about upcoming contacts as they are scheduled.

[ANS thanks ARISS, and Charlie, AJ9N for the above information]

———————————————————————

* Satellite Shorts From All Over

* SpaceX to launch rocket Dec 19, six months after blast

SpaceX on Thursday announced plans to launch its Falcon 9 on December 19, its
first mission since a massive explosion after liftoff destroyed the rocket and
its space station cargo six months ago.
SpaceX CEO Elon Musk wrote on Twitter that the company is preparing for a
static fire — an engine test on the launch pad at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center
in Cape Canaveral, Florida — on December 16, followed by “launch about three
days later.”
The Falcon rocket will carry 11 satellites for the US company Orbcomm into low-
Earth orbit, a company spokesman said.
The spokesman did not say when SpaceX planned to begin sending cargo to the
International Space Station again.
SpaceX’s only competitor in the commercial resupply industry is Orbital ATK,
which also suffered a major setback when its Antares rocket exploded after
launching from Wallops Island, Virginia in October 2014.

Orbital ATK launched on Sunday its unmanned Cygnus cargo ship to the ISS, this
time aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket while it upgrades the
Antares, which previously used a reconditioned Ukrainian rocket engine.

The Falcon 9 exploded on June 28, just over two minutes after launching from
Cape Canaveral with its Dragon cargo ship loaded with supplies for the
astronauts living in space.
Musk said the blast was due to a faulty strut.
The accident was a blow to the California-based company, which was the first
commercial outfit to send a cargo craft to space under a $1.6 billion contract
with NASA.
The Falcon 9 rocket that is scheduled to fly December 19 is a new version that
is 30 percent more powerful and designed to improve the controlled landing of
the rocket’s first stage, a mission that SpaceX has been attempting to refine
in the hope of one day making rockets as reusable as airplanes.
SpaceX has tried multiple times to land its rocket upright on a floating
platform in the Atlantic Ocean, without success.
For this next launch, SpaceX said it plans to attempt a touchdown on land for
the first time.

Amazon founder Jeff Bezos, an Internet entrepreneur who like Musk also owns a
rocket company, announced on November 24 that he had successfully landed his
New Shepard rocket after a suborbital flight.
While Bezos touted the achievement, Musk and other experts pointed out that it
would have been much easier to control the landing of a rocket that flies lower
in altitude than the first stage of the Falcon 9.
Once rockets do become reusable, analysts say the practice will save millions
of dollars in equipment and launch costs.

see
http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/SpaceX_to_launch_rocket_Dec_19_six_months_
after_blast_999.html

[ANS thanks SpaceDaily.com for the above information]

———————————————————————

/EX

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the
President’s Club. Members of the President’s Club, as sustaining
donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive addi-
tional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT
Office.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership
at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students
enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the stu-
dent rate for a maximum of 6 post-secondary years in this status.
Contact Martha at the AMSAT Office for additional student membership
information.

73,
This week’s ANS Editor,
Joe Spier, K6WAO
k6wao at amsat dot org

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE
ANS-340

The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and infor-
mation service of AMSAT North America, The Radio Amateur Satellite
Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in Space
including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur
Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building,
launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio
satellites.

The news feed on http://www.amsat.org publishes news of Amateur
Radio in Space as soon as our volunteers can post it.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to:
ans-editor at amsat.org.

In this edition:

* AMSAT Ground Terminal Development Expands to Texas
* AMSAT SKN on OSCAR 2016 In Memory of W2BXA
* Upcoming ARISS Contact Schedule as of 2015-12-02 20:30 UTC
* WRC-15 Satellite News
* Cubesat by an Elementary School Will be Aboard the Orbital-ATK Cygnus Launch
* 73 on 73 Award Recipients

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-340.01
ANS-340 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 340.01
From AMSAT HQ Kensington, MD.
December 6, 2015
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-340.01

AMSAT Ground Terminal Development Expands to Texas

Hardware consisting of Ettus Research USRP X300 SDR, USRP B210 SDR, UBX40 USRP
Daughterboard, GPDSO Kits, and antennas have been ordered from National
Instruments Corp. for delivery to Bill Reed NX5R in Dallas TX to equip a second
community for development of the AMSAT Ground Terminals. These terminals will be
used for the Phase 4B and other digital/microwave satellites being developed by
AMSAT and in partnership with Virginia Tech.

Michelle Thompson W5NYV has been leading the effort in the San Diego CA area,
which started up when the P4B project was announced earlier this year. Amateur
radio operators in the Southern California area from AMSAT, Palomar Amateur
Radio Club, and the San Diego Microwave Society have been implementing a
terrestrial system to mimic the ground and space segments of a digital satellite
communications link and developing code and hardware techniques for use in the
P4B and future HEO opportunities that AMSAT is pursuing. Expanding the system to
the Dallas area will allow more collaboration, development, and testing by AMSAT
and North Texas Microwave Society amateurs with San Diego and other regions. The
investment in equipment and community building will increase the number and
quality of ideas in developing this next generation system of amateur radio
satellite communications.

Another development system is being planned for the east coast. AMSAT is
actively recruiting individuals and groups that want to work together to
establish increased regional technical activity in support of satellite service
goals. Rick Hambly W2GPS has campaigned for the creation of this very type of
activity on the east coast for many years. Successful east-coast expansion will
add even more variability and expertise to the project.

By involving amateurs who have expertise in both microwave and digital
communications and in varying terrain and conditions, as well as including
people with various backgrounds and experience, AMSAT plans to produce a ground
terminal that will be useful with a variety of next generation satellites
including Phase 4B, Phase 3E, the Heimdallr Lunar Cube Quest CubeSat, and an
AMSAT developed HEO CubeSat. These are all projects currently being pursued by
the AMSAT Engineering and ASCENT (Advanced Satellite Communications and
Exploration of New Technology) Teams.

“The development of a ground terminal along with satellite projects is part of a
plan to offer a way for amateurs to buy, build, or access ideas to develop their
own ground terminals which will be useful for many future AMSAT satellite
mission for years to come” said AMSAT-NA Vice President of Engineering Jerry
Buxton, N0JY. “The concept of common uplink (5 GHz) and downlink (10 GHz)
frequencies with software defined transponders allows many different
experimentation and communications opportunities ranging from simple texting to
voice, streaming video, data exchange, and reliable EMCOMM access in remote
areas, with bandwidths to support many satellites and users.”

If you are interested in supporting the effort please visit
http://ww2.amsat.org/?page_id=1121 to submit a request. While those who live in
the San Diego, Dallas, or Maryland areas may find it easier to participate,
volunteers from other areas are welcome to join and contribute remotely.

[ANS thanks Jerry, NØJY, for the above information]

———————————————————————

AMSAT SKN on OSCAR 2016 In Memory of W2BXA

You are cordially invited to participate in Straight Key Night on OSCAR 2016,
sponsored by AMSAT for all radio amateurs throughout the world.

Operate CW through any amateur satellite from 0001 through 2400 UTC on 1 January
2016, using a manual, non-electronic key. Note that bugs are now allowed, as
they are in similar ARRL and SKCC events.

There is no need to send in a log, but please nominate someone you worked for
Best Fist. Your nominee need not have the best fist of those you heard, just of
those you worked. Send your nomination to w2rs@amsat.org.. A list of those
nominated will be published in early February.

This year’s event is being held in memory of Ben Stevenson, W2BXA (1914-2011).
Licensed since 1929, Ben was one of the world’s top DXers on both HF and
satellites. He led the DXCC Honor Roll for many years, and among his many
awards were Satellite DXCC No. 1 and post-war Worked All Zones No. 1. Founding
president of the North Jersey DX Association, Ben shared his knowledge and
enthusiasm with one and all.

[ANS thanks Ray, W2RS, for the above information]

———————————————————————

Upcoming ARISS Contact Schedule as of 2015-12-02 20:30 UTC

Quick list of scheduled contacts and events:

Nanasawa Kibounooka Elementary School, Atsugi, Japan, direct via 8N1NKSG
The ISS callsign is presently scheduled to be NA1SS
The scheduled astronaut is Kimiya Yui KG5BPH
Contact was successful: Wed 2015-12-02 09:33:51 UTC 61 deg

Yayoi Elementary School, Yatomi, Japan, direct via 8N2YAYOI
The ISS callsign is presently scheduled to be NA1SS
The scheduled astronaut is Kimiya Yui KG5BPH
Contact is a go for: Fri 2015-12-04 09:25:46 UTC 57 deg

Dragonskolan, Umeå, Sweden, telebridge via LU1CGB
The ISS callsign is presently scheduled to be NA1SS
The scheduled astronaut is Kjell Lindgren KO5MOS
Contact is a go for: Fri 2015-12-04 10:15:01 UTC 72 deg

Ingushetia, Russia, direct via TBD
The ISS callsign is presently scheduled to be RSØISS
The scheduled astronaut is Sergey Volkov RU3DIS
Contact is a go for: Sat 2015-12-05 16:25 UTC

Konstanty Ildefons Galczynski Junior High School, Swietajno, Poland,
telebridge via LU1CGB
The ISS callsign is presently scheduled to be NA1SS
The scheduled astronaut is Kjell Lindgren KO5MOS
Contact is a go for: Tue 2015-12-08 08:19:31 UTC 62 deg

[ANS thanks Charlie, AJ9N, for the above information]

———————————————————————

WRC-15 Satellite News

In his report for Day 16 of the WRC-15 conference Colin Thomas G3PSM says:

Discussions took place on suggested frequency bands for possible new or an
upgrade of existing allocations to the space operations service within the
frequency ranges 150.05-174 MHz, 400.15-420 MHz [and 420-450 MHz] for short
duration satellites.

This potential future agenda item is an attempt to overcome the problem of
non-amateur nano- and pico-satellites using the amateur service bands. No
decision was reached and the document has been passed to plenary for decision.

More reports about WRC-15 activities can be found at
http://rsgb.org/main/blog/category/news/special-focus/wrc-15/

[ANS thanks AMSAT-UK for the above information

———————————————————————

Cubesat by an Elementary School Will be Aboard the Orbital-ATK Cygnus Launch

NASA will enable the deployment of three small research satellites, or CubeSats,
selected through the CubeSat Launch Initiative (CSLI) for two universities and
one primary school as part of the ninth installment of the Educational Launch of
Nanosatellite (ELaNa) missions.

Full story at this URL:

http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/ELaNa_IX_mission_launches_first_cubesat_built_
by_elementary_school_students_999.html

[ANS thanks SpaceDaily for the above information]

———————————————————————

73 on 73 Award Recipients

Paul Stoetzer N8HM reports more awards have been issued for contacts made via
the AO-73 (FUNcube-1) amateur radio satellite.

The 73 on 73 Award aims to promote activity on AO-73. The requirements are
straight-forward:

1. Work 73 unique stations on AO-73.
2. Contacts must be made on or after September 1, 2014.
3. There are no geographic restrictions on your operating location.

The latest recipients are:
20. David D’Aliesio IW0HLG – 31 May 2015
21. Kiyosi Hasegawa JA3FWT – 22 June 2015
22. Mariusz Kocot SQ9MES – 28 June 2015
23. Hector Luis Martinez W5CBF – 12 July 2015
24. George K. Carr II WA5KBH – 17 July 2015
25. Michel Ribot F6GLJ – 18 July 2015
26. Paul Stoetzer N8HM – 21 July 2015
27. Jeffrey Lamb NX9B – 2 August 2015
28. Imre Füzi HA1SE – 13 September 2015
29. Herman Blom PB0AHX – 1 November 2015
30. Joseba Andoni Barrio – 22 November 2015

Full information on how to apply is at
73 on 73 Award

[ANS thanks AMSAT-UK for the above information]

/EX

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the
President’s Club. Members of the President’s Club, as sustaining
donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive addi-
tional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT
Office.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership
at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students
enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the stu-
dent rate for a maximum of 6 post-secondary years in this status.
Contact Martha at the AMSAT Office for additional student membership
information.

73,
This week’s ANS Editor,
Lee McLamb, KU4OS
ku4os at amsat dot org

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE
ANS-333

The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and infor-
mation service of AMSAT North America, The Radio Amateur Satellite
Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in Space
including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur
Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building,
launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio
satellites.

The news feed on http://www.amsat.org publishes news of Amateur
Radio in Space as soon as our volunteers can post it.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to:
ans-editor at amsat.org.

In this edition:

* Nov/Dec Edition of AMSAT Journal Sent to Printer
* March 2016 Activation of St. Pierre & Miquelon
* 2016 High-Altitude Student Platform Opportunity
* ARISS Commemorative Events in the Planning
* S7 Sao Tome and Principe Dxpedition Includes LEO Satellites
* ARISS News
* Satellite Shorts From All Over

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-333
ANS-333 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 333
From AMSAT HQ KENSINGTON, MD.
[MONTH DAY, YEAR]
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-333

Nov/Dec Edition of AMSAT Journal Sent to Printer

AMSAT Journal editor Joe Kornowski, KB6IGK, reports that the
November-December editon of the Journal has been sent to to the
printers. Expect delivery mid to late December.

This is Kornowski’s first Journal since accepting the Editorial post
last October. The atricles are well done and ‘meaty’ with lots of
information. The overall appearance looks great. There is much here
for every AMSAT member to enjoy.

The line up of articles include:
AMSAT Announcements

Apogee View, Barry Baines, WD4ASW,

Engineering Update, by Jerry Buxton, N0JY

Fox-1 Satellite Telemetry Part 1: On the Satellite by Burns Fisher,
W2BFJ

A Raspberry Pi Net Server/Client for Antenna Rotor by Tom Doyle, W9KE

Dual Band Low Noise Amplifier for 2 Meters and 70 Centimeters, by
Jim Kocsis, WA9PYH

ARISS “Out of This World” Update by Frank Bauer, KA3HDO

Close Encounters of the Law Enforcement Kind by Patrick Stoddard,
WD9EWK/VA7EWK

On the Grids: Working the United States/Mexico Border by Clayton L.
Coleman, W5PFG

[ANS thanks Joseph KB6IGK for the above information]

———————————————————————

March 2016 Activation of St. Pierre & Miquelon

Eric, KV1J, will once again be operating from the Island of Miquelon
(NA-032, DIFO FP-002, WLOTA 1417, Grid GN17) as FP/KV1J between March
16-29th (2016). Activity will be on 160-10 meters using CW, SSB and
RTTY (but primarily SSB and RTTY). He will generally be on the
highest frequency band that is open (favoring 12/10m). He will be
active in the Russian DX and BARTG RTTY Contests (March 19-20th).
Also, look for him to be in the CQWW WPX SSB Contest (March 26-27th)
as a Single-Op/All-Band/Assisted entry. QSL via KV1J, direct or by
the Bureau. Also eQSL and LoTW. For more details and updates, check
out his Web page at:
http://www.kv1j.com/fp/Mar16.html

PLEASE NOTE:
Eric mentions, “I will also be on the analog Satellites when the WX
is good enough to operate from outside.”

[ANS thanks Ohio/Penn DX Bulletin No. 1241 for the above information]

———————————————————————

2016 High-Altitude Student Platform Opportunity

The Louisiana Space Grant Consortium, or LaSPACE, is accepting
applications from students at U.S. colleges and universities who want
to send experiments to the edge of space on a high-flying scientific
balloon.

The annual project, supported by the NASA Balloon Program Office and
LaSPACE, provides near-space access for 12 undergraduate and graduate
student experiments to be carried by a NASA high-altitude research
balloon. The flights typically last 15 to 20 hours and reach an
altitude of 23 miles.
Experiments may include compact satellites or prototypes.

The experiments are flown aboard the High-Altitude Student Platform,
or HASP, a balloon-born instrument stack launched from the Columbia
Scientific Balloon Facility’s remote site in Fort Sumner, New Mexico.
The goals of the project are to provide a space test platform to
encourage student researchand stimulate the development of student
satellite payloads and other space-engineering products.

HASP seeks to enhance the technical skills and research abilities of
students in critical science, technology, engineering and mathematics
disciplines.

The deadline for applications is Dec. 18, 2015.

For application information and technical details about the program,
visit
http://laspace.lsu.edu/hasp.

Questions about the High-Altitude Student Platform opportunity
should be directed to T. Gregory Guzik at
guzik (at) phunds.phys.lsu.edu.

[ANS thanks NASA Education Express Message — Nov. 25, 2015 for the
above information]

———————————————————————

ARISS Commemorative Events in the Planning

Over the next couple months, ARISS will be celebrating its 15th
anniversary of continuous operations on the ISS. On November 13, 2000
the crew conducted their first ham radio contacts on ISS and on
December 21, 2000 ARISS conducted their first school contact with the
Burbank School in Burbank, Illinois.

An SSTV commemoration of these historic events is tentatively planned for
mid to late December. It is possible that the transmission mode will be P120
instead of the P180 mode used in the past. This would allow for more
pictures to be transmitted per pass.

Because preparations are not final it is suggested that you stay tuned to
the AMSAT-BB and the AMSAT and ARISS web site for the latest information on
this event and others that ARISS plans to conduct over the next few months

[ANS thanks ARISS for the above information]

———————————————————————

S7 Sao Tome and Principe Dxpedition Includes LEO Satellites

S7, SAO TOME AND PRINCIPE. Operators Lee/WW2DX, Ray/W2RE and
Pat/N2IEN will be active as S9TM from Praia between November 28th and
December 1st.

The team is planning on taking a WRTC tri-band yagi for 10/15/20 as
well as a OCF for the lower bands. They will have an Expert 1.3K amp
with them for that station. The second station will be K3/KPA500 that
will be used on the 30/17/12m bands. A third station will be setup
for LEO satellites and they are going to attempt 2m EME, but this is
new territory for this group so don’t set expectations too high. They
will be posting to Twitter
https://twitter.com/@ww2dx>
and possible live streaming using periscope.

QSL via LoTW and paper cards to NR6M.

[ANS thanks Ohio/Penn DX Bulletin No. 1242 for the above information]

———————————————————————

ARISS News

+ A Successful contact was made between Scuola Media Statale “G.
Marconi”, Soleto, Lecce, Italy and Astronaut Kimiya Yui KG5BPH using
Callsign NA1SS. The contact began 2015-11-23 09:21 UTC and lasted
about nine and a half minutes. Contact was telebridged via VK4KHZ.
ARISS Mentor was IKØWGF.

Upcoming ARISS Contact Schedule as of 2015-11-26 01:00 UTC

Quick list of scheduled contacts and events:

Dragonskolan, Umeå, Sweden, telebridge via VE4ISS
The ISS callsign is presently scheduled to be NA1SS
The scheduled astronaut is Kjell Lindgren KO5MOS
Contact was not successful: Wed 2015-11-25 09:44:25 UTC 78 deg
ARISS is working to determine what happened.

Nanasawa Kibounooka Elementary School, Atsugi, Japan, direct via
8N1NKSG
The ISS callsign is presently scheduled to be NA1SS
The scheduled astronaut is Kimiya Yui KG5BPH
Contact is a go for: Wed 2015-12-02 09:33:51 UTC 61 deg

Yayoi Elementary School, Yatomi, Japan, direct via 8N2YAYOI
The ISS callsign is presently scheduled to be NA1SS
The scheduled astronaut is Kimiya Yui KG5BPH
Contact is a go for: Fri 2015-12-04 09:25:46 UTC 57 deg

Ingushetia, Russia, direct via TBD
The ISS callsign is presently scheduled to be RSØISS
The scheduled astronaut is Sergey Volkov RU3DIS
Contact is a go for: Sat 2015-12-05 16:25 UTC

From 2015-12-20 to 2016-01-04, there will be no US Operational
Segment (USOS) hams on board ISS. So any schools contacts during
this period will be conducted by the ARISS Russia team.

Stay tuned to the AMSAT-BB, The AMSAT website {www.asmat.org) and
the ARISS website (www.ariss.org) for information on ARISS
commemorative events celebrating 15 years of Amateur Radio on the ISS.

[ANS thanks ARISS, Charlie AJ9N and David AA4KN for the above
information]

———————————————————————

Satellite Shorts From All Over

Eduardo Erlemann PY2RN published a Panoramic view of AO-7
transponder, using FCDP+ for RX and TS-2000 for TX. Although he was
late on he bird after 1/2 pass that started at 18:40 UTC, forgot to
swap SDR# IQ in the first moment.
Max elevation was 64deg TX power 5 Watts all the time and RHCP most
of the time. About 2 min before end of recording it is possible to
hear what he believes is a CU station calling.

Find the recording at:

[ANS thank Eduardo PY2RN for the above information]

———————————————————————

/EX

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the
President’s Club. Members of the President’s Club, as sustaining
donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive addi-
tional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT
Office.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership
at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students
enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the stu-
dent rate for a maximum of 6 post-secondary years in this status.
Contact Martha at the AMSAT Office for additional student membership
information.

73,
This week’s ANS Editor,
EMike McCardel, KC8YLD
kc8yld at amsat dot org

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE
ANS-326
The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and infor-
mation service of AMSAT North America, The Radio Amateur Satellite
Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in Space
including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur
Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building,
launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio
satellites.

The news feed on http://www.amsat.org publishes news of Amateur
Radio in Space as soon as our volunteers can post it.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to:
ans-editor at amsat.org.

In this edition:

* AO-85 Commissioned, Handed Over To AMSAT-NA Operations
* The Second Birthday of FUNcube-1 (AO-73)
* FM Repeater Test at IO-86 Satellite
* AMSAT-LU announces transponder satellite payload and launch
* Space Brazilian Agency With Amateur radio PY2SDR LABRE/AMSAT-BR
* United Launch Alliance Reveals Transformational CubeSat Launch Program
* Nayif-1 at UAE YouthConnect
* DeorbitSail Update and Initial Camera Image
* SPROUT SSTV and Digitalker active every Sunday
* AMSAT Events
* ARISS News
* Satellite Shorts From All Over

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-326.01
ANS-326 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 326.01
>From AMSAT HQ KENSINGTON, MD.
DATE November 22, 2015
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-326.01

———————————————————————

AO-85 Commissioned, Handed Over To AMSAT-NA Operations

AO-85 has been formally commissioned and turned over to AMSAT
Operations, who are now responsible for the scheduling and modes.

The following guidelines are provided for users:

Uplink power should be on the order of minimum 200 W EIRP for full
quieting at lower antenna elevation angles. Your mileage may vary.
With an Arrow, 5 W has been used successfully to make contacts.

Polarity is important. The satellite antennas are linear. So, if you
are using linearly polarized antennas, you will need to adjust
throughout the pass. Full duplex operation facilitates these
adjustments while transmitting and is highly recommended.

The downlink is very strong and should be heard well with almost any
antenna.

Downlink audio is 5 kHz deviation, as expected. Many will perceive
that the audio is “low.” This is an effect of the filtering below 300
Hz, which provides for the DUV telemetry, coupled with any noise on
the uplink signal resulting from lack of full quieting or being off
frequency. That makes for less fidelity than a typical receiver in
terms of audio frequencies passed.

Transmit (downlink) frequency varies with temperature. Due to the
wide range of temperatures we are seeing in the eclipse cycle, the
transmitter can be anywhere from around 500 Hz low at 10°C to near 2
kHz low at 40°C.

Receive frequency has been generally agreed to be about 435.170 MHz,
although the AFC makes that hard to pin down and also helps with the
uplinks that are off frequency.

Probably the most notable observations about AO-85 are an apparent
lack of sensitivity and difficulty in turning on the repeater with
the 67 Hz CTCSS when it is not yet activated, or holding it on by the
presence of the CTCSS. We have determined a probable cause for the
sensitivity issue and while that can’t be fixed on AO-85 we are
taking steps to prevent similar issues on the rest of the Fox-1
CubeSats. The tone detection threshold along with the receive
sensitivity issue makes it hard to bring up the repeater. This is
being addressed by adjusting the values for a valid tone detection in
the other Fox-1 CubeSats now that we have on orbit information about
temperatures and power budget. Full details will be in the Nov/Dec
AMSAT Journal.

It is important to remember that science is the reason behind the
Fox-1 satellites. Not only does science help with the launch cost, it
provides a great amount of educational value both from the science
payload and in amateur radio itself. The data-under-voice (DUV)
telemetry is an excellent way to provide the science without
sacrificing the use of the satellite for communications, which would
be the case if higher speed downlinks were needed. DUV provides
constant science as long as the repeater is in use, which in turn
provides more downlink data for the science – a mutually beneficial
combination.

Fox-1A is AMSAT-NA’s first CubeSat. Many new techniques are
incorporated and lessons will be learned, as with any new “product.”
The Fox-1 Project is a series of CubeSats. A total of five will be
built and flown. Launches are scheduled for three more, and a new
NASA CubeSat Launch Initiative proposal will be submitted for the
fifth. We will incorporate changes from what we learn in each launch,
to the extent possible, in subsequent Fox-1 CubeSats.

Of the four NASA sponsored CubeSats on the ELaNa XII launch October
8, we are sad to report that ARC1 was never heard from and BisonSat
was lost after a few weeks of operation. AMSAT extends our deepest
sympathy to the people who worked so hard on these projects. To our
members, we want to say that the Fox Team is very proud and pleased
that our first CubeSat is very successful and hopefully will be for
some time.

[ANS thanks AMSAT’s Vice President of Engineering, Jerry Buxton, N0JY
for the above information]

———————————————————————

The Second Birthday of FUNcube-1 (AO-73)

The FUNcube-1 Ops Team reports:
FUNcube-1 was launched into space two years ago on November 21st 2013.

We are delighted to be able to report that more than 900 stations, including
many schools around the world, have received the telemetry from the spacecraft
since launch. Our Data Warehouse is storing more than 750 MB of data from
almost 1 million data packets. We are very grateful to everyone who has been
contributing to the success of this mission. Please continue to keep the data
flowing as it will provide a valuable resource for students in the future.

The stats continue – speeding along at around 17,500 mph, FUNcube-1, which had
a launch mass of just 982 grams, has completed more than 10,500 orbits of the
earth. This means a total distance travelled of more than 260 million miles.

All telemetry sensors continue to provide valid data, real time, whole orbit
and high resolution channels alike. The flight code is really robust and we
have only had three unexpected “events” since launch. Two of these we believe
to have been caused by noise of the command receiver being incorrectly
interpreted as a command and only one appears to have been caused by a RAM
error. The battery and solar panels also continue to work perfectly and provide
a very positive power budget.

We have sent out many Fitter messages for school and other similar events.
Earlier this week there was a demonstration at Thorne Green Top School in
Yorkshire.

Here is a report from Dave EI4HT/M0GIW:
Good Morning All

Firstly -thanks to all for your help, we had a great morning at Green Top and
the highlight was FUNcube.

I started with a slide show talking about communications from cave paintings
all the way up to smartphones, we looked at space communications and travel
from Sputnik to Astra and Apollo to the Millennium Falcon! We spoke about
satellites and how they are used every day and how we all got to watch “I’m A
Celebrity” via Satellite last night from Australia.

I brought in lots of props too, some old Motorola MX330 radios, some PMR 446,
and a marine band radio .I also had a small model of a CubeSat that I knocked
up over the weekend, I also passed around some NOAA images from last week’s
Abigail storm and I had a few QSL cards from ISS and MIR from years ago when I
lived in Ireland.

The FUNcube pass was great, really strong signals, I had my turnstile and FCD
set up and had audio through speakers and used the class projector to show
Satpc32 and the Dashboard.

There was a great buzz of excitement when we got the first packet and even
more when the Fitter messages came through. The kids were fascinated to see the
signal arrive just as the software predicted and then hear the telemetry and
the decode.

After the pass we were able to look at the Warehouse online and print off the
QSL card and certificate.

I didn’t get a chance to take many pics but Mrs Overson will update the
School Blog and she took lots of pics.

http://greentopschool.co.uk/blog

Once again thanks to all at FUNcube, looking forward to Tim Peake on the ISS
in the New Year and planning another visit to the School then.

Regards
Dave EI4HT / M0GIW

PS: I was back dropping my own kids off this morning and Mrs Overson told me
they have printed a QSL card and Certificate for each of the students and they
have used them for their class journals.

As well providing a great educational resource, FUNcube-1 operates at night
and generally at weekends with the linear transponder active for radio amateurs
to use for communications. The transponder continues to provide an excellent
service. As users will be aware, the transponder uplink frequencies vary with
receiver temperature. The RX temp telemetry channel is the best one to use for
tracking this effect. This does make it quite difficult to use full computer
control for transponder operations and we have already developed new oscillator
circuits to improve this performance for future missions.

For the telemetry uplinked to the Data Warehouse, it is possible to download
special Certificate or QSL Card here
http://amsatuk.me.uk/on/funcube_qsl.php
and, for transponder users, the “73 on 73 award” continues at
73 on 73 Award

The Nayif-1 CubeSat mission, which includes a full FUNcube payload, is
expected to be launched into a similar orbit in the first half of next year and
will provide an additional level of service to the community.

Meanwhile we hope everyone will continue to have fun with FUNcube-1!

See:
The Second Birthday of FUNcube-1

[ANS thanks Graham, G3VZV and the FUNcube-1 Ops Team for the above information]

———————————————————————

FM Repeater Test at IO-86 Satellite

A confirmation for the upcoming test of the FM Repeater on IO-86 Satellite
(LAPAN-A2/ORARI), has been announced and would be conducted this weekend:
– Saturday, 21 Nov 2015, at 02:30 UTC – 04:50UTC
– Sunday, 22 Nov 2015, at 02:55 – 05:00 UTC
Voice Repeater info:
– Uplink 145.880 Mhz tone 88,5
– Downlink 435.880 Mhz

AMSAT Keplerian data
0 IO-86
1 40931U 15052B 15316.15776324 .00001070 00000-0 60618-4 0 9994
2 40931 6.0030 69.3893 0012877 275.6206 84.2533 14.76374433 6653

As the satellite was designed for emcomm using handheld radio (the reason of
the relatively high-power downlink), we would like all reports of portable ops
(handheld radio using some sort of portable directional antenna,
i.e. CJU / IOio / Moxon / Arrow / etc).

Responses via the amsat-bb

[ANS thanks Suryono Adisoemarta – YD0NXX / N5SNN for the above information]

———————————————————————

AMSAT-LU announces transponder satellite payload and launch

(From AMSAT-LU Facebook page:)
Dear friends,

Since several years ago AMSAT Argentina is working to keep alive the dream of
many amateur radio back into space with a satellite of its own, which is the
continuity of the legendary LuSat-1 of the años1990 and reaping the benefits of
the technological advance of our days.

For this held various technical activities, developing experiments on board
the occasional platforms, all with the same objective: to preserve the human
group, enhance their capabilities and spread their resources by guiding them to
the education and development of the activity.

In recent times, AMSAT Argentina has been working in many ways with the
company Satellogic, which already launched three satellites of low orbit:
Captain Beto, manolito and tita, two of them are now broadcast telemetry and
data in uhf and are identified in the Distinctive LU7AA.

Under an agreement signed between the two institutions AMSAT-LU provides
support to those missions operate one of the stations of control in uppsala,
Prov. Of BS. As.

Currently satellogic is facing the construction of a constellation of
satellites of observation of the earth and has invited AMSAT-LU to participate
in the project of the next two satellites, the ÑUSAT 1 AND ÑUSAT 2, riding on
one of them a Linear Transponder Analog Amateur Radio Antenna and its
corresponding.

The experiment which provides AMSAT was tested on several occasions in the
land, and also on board one of flights in a balloon launched from the prov. Of
the Pampas. At that time was called carposat, showing a good performance in
spite of its low power and small size and weight.

On this occasion, the experiment of AMSAT LU – that has no name yet own – will
be further reduced in its dimensions and mounted on a plaque radiadora of 10 x
10 cm, in which also won’t hold the necessary components for the Source of food
and the duplexer. The package will be installed on the bus from the NUSAT,
which will provide the energy and will be part of a number of other experiments
that will carry out this satellite.

The Transponder receives in the band of UHF and VHF Transmitted in, has a
bandwidth of 30 Khz and its output power is 200 mw.;

Frequencies of ascent 435.935 ~ 965 Lsb / CW,
Frequencies of descent 145.965 ~ 935 USB / CW.
Basic telemetry in 145.900 CW.

The launch is scheduled for April 2016 with a Chinese launcher in a polar orbit
at 500 km. In Height and an inclination of 97 degrees with respect to the
equator.

This is an extraordinary opportunity to our institution, and for all the
Radioamateurs Argentines, be able to have a new satellite in orbit, after after
so many years of successful LuSat-1.

So far, the funds needed for the preliminary activities of recent years, the
construction and the logistics, were provided by a small number of members of
the board of directors and partners of AMSAT-LU. Now come the largest economic
positions for the completion of the electronics and integration with the
satellite principal.

In order to comply with this circumstance, it has been proposed the
establishment of a list where it will include the names and distinctive signs
of all those who are able and willing to work together, and then give them a
certificate alluding to his gesture.

The neighbors of the autonomous city or the great Buenos Aires, can perform
their collaboration personally during the monthly meetings of AMSAT-LU. Also at
the headquarters of the RC Qrm Belgrano, permanent partners of AMSAT-LU. If I’d
be interested in making donations from other sites away, we’ll let you know the
way to make their contribution.

Also, we would like to take this opportunity to invite all the partners of
AMSAT and amateur radio colleagues who are interested in suggest the name and
the logo for our next satellite Argentine, write to us on the page of AMSAT
Argentina in Facebook or sending it by e-mail to
parapente@amsat.org.ar.

[ANS thanks Ignacio Mazzitelli, LU1ESY for the above information]

———————————————————————

Space Brazilian Agency With Amateur radio PY2SDR LABRE/AMSAT-BR

Brasilia, November 20, 2015 – The Brazilian Space Agency (AEB) received on
Tuesday (17) the visit of amateur Edson Wander Pereira, the first to receive
and decode the data sent by Serpens-1 cubesat.

The nanossatélite was launched into orbit from the International Space Station
(ISS), the 17th of last September. Ham Radio is in Brasilia
(DF) to attend the 7th Meeting of Science and Technology (ECT – FGA) which ends
today (20) in the Range Campus of the University of Brasilia (UNB).

Pereira lives in Pardinho (SP) and his visit emphasized the importance of
dissemination of knowledge to amateurs and students who are interested in
nanossatélites.

“The experimental amateur radio is an activity that collaborates with the
nanossatélites projects. This joint action causes the development of CubeSats
in schools and universities is promoted by having more data exchange
possibilities transmitted by these nanos, “says Pereira.

At the meeting with President of the Agency, José Raimundo Braga, Pereira
received from teacher Chantal Capeletti, of UNB and coordinator of Serpens
Program, a transmitter that can be used to send data to the satellite and
experiment with its payload.

This equipment is part of the mission ground follow-up and was produced in
limited numbers, but will be distributed to experimental radio amateurs
operating in the area and among the member institutions of the nanossatélite
consortium.

See the story here
http://www.aeb.gov.br/radioamador-experimental-visita-aeb-apos-decodificar-
dados-do-serpens-1/

[ANS thanks Paulo, PV8DX for the above information]

———————————————————————

United Launch Alliance Reveals Transformational CubeSat Launch Program

Centennial, Colo., (Nov. 19, 2015) – As the most experienced launch company
in the nation, United Launch Alliance (ULA) announced today it is taking
CubeSat rideshares to the next level by launching a new, innovative program
offering universities the chance to compete for free CubeSat rides on future
launches.

“ULA will offer universities the chance to compete for at least six CubeSat
launch slots on two Atlas V missions, with a goal to eventually add university
CubeSat slots to nearly every Atlas and Vulcan launch,” said Tory Bruno, ULA
president and CEO. “There is a growing need for universities to have access and
availability to launch their CubeSats and this program will transform the way
these universities get to space by making space more affordable and accessible.”

“This is exactly the kind of collaborative innovation that we celebrate in
Colorado,” said Lt. Gov. Joseph Garcia. “Here, we have a Colorado company
giving Colorado students at a Colorado university an unbelievable opportunity
to send a satellite into space. What a great day for our state.”

Rideshare is a flight-proven, innovative approach that provides customers a
low-cost way to achieve various mission objectives without the need for a
dedicated launch vehicle. CubeSats are miniaturized satellites originally
designed for use in conjunction with university educational projects and are
typically 10 cm x 10 cm x 10 cm (4 inches x 4 inches x 4 inches) and
approximately 1.3 kg (3 lbs).

“Since its inception, ULA has been committed to science, technology,
engineering and math (STEM) education initiatives and programs such as this
help to motivate, educate and develop our next generation of rocket scientists
and space entrepreneurs,” said Bruno. “We are making the announcement today
with University of Colorado President Bruce Benson and University of Colorado
Boulder Chancellor Philip DiStefano, key partners in STEM education, and are
pleased to offer the university the first free CubeSat launch slot in 2017.”

“CU-Boulder students have been building and operating small satellites for 20
years, including the Colorado Student Space Weather CubeSat launched on a ULA
Atlas rocket in 2012,” DiStefano said. “The ability to provide science and
engineering students with the opportunity to fly the satellites they build is
an invaluable motivational and educational tool. We are thrilled to partner
with ULA, a visionary organization that is helping to facilitate a nationwide
STEM effort.”

Interested universities should email ULACubeSats@ulalaunch.com by Dec. 18,
2015 to notify ULA they are interested in participating. In early 2016, ULA
will release a request for proposal (RFP) for the first competitive CubeSat
launch slots. The selected universities will be announced in August 2016.

In addition, ULA is offering the nation’s universities the chance to help name
the new CubeSat program. Universities, educators and students can submit names
for consideration to ULACubeSats@ulalaunch.com using a campus-issued email
address. Submissions are due by Dec.18, 2015. The winning name will be
announced early next year, and the institution will receive a free CubeSat
launch slot on a future mission.

As America’s ride to space, ULA has launched 102 missions, including 55
CubeSats, with 100 percent mission success.

About United Launch Alliance
With more than a century of combined heritage, United Launch Alliance is the
nation’s most experienced and reliable launch service provider. ULA has
successfully delivered more than 100 satellites to orbit that provide critical
capabilities for troops in the field, aid meteorologists in tracking severe
weather, enable personal device-based GPS navigation and unlock the mysteries
of our solar system.
For more information on ULA, visit the ULA website at
www.ulalaunch.com .
Join the conversation at
www.facebook.com/ulalaunch

twitter.com/ulalaunch and

instagram.com/ulalaunch.

See America’s Ride to Space Offers University Competition for Free STEM
CubeSat Rides on Future Launches
http://www.ulalaunch.com/ula-reveals-transformational-cubesat-launch.aspx?title
=United+Launch+Alliance+Reveals+Transformational+CubeSat+Launch+Program+

http://www.ulalaunch.com/cubesats.aspx

See also:
http://spaceflightnow.com/2015/11/19/ula-says-it-will-launch-some-cubesats-for
-free/

[ANS thanks Jeff Yanko, WB3JFS on the AMSAT-BB for the above information]

———————————————————————

Nayif-1 at UAE YouthConnect

YouthConnect is an initiative led by the Expo 2020 UAE team and is catered
specifically for the Youth of today. The Nayif-1 team took part in the event by
throwing a workshop titled “Introduction to Cubesatellites.”
YouthConnect is the first in a long-lasting and wide-ranging series highly
interactive forums designed by youth for youth. The inaugural event took take
place on Saturday, November 14, 2015. This first interactive, full-day forum,
part of a far wider programme to talk to the younger members of society, was
open to all UAE residents between the ages of 18-25.
“From our earliest days conceiving Expo”, says Her Excellency Reem Al Hashimy,
UAE Minister of State and Director General of the Bureau Dubai Expo 2020 “we
were determined to put our youth at the heart of our plans. It is these young
men and women who will be representing and leading our nation in the years to
come. So it is important that they contribute to these events and decide what
they want to see and do on the day.”
Nayif-1 was built by students at the American University of Sharjah, UAE, in
partnership with the Mohammed bin Rashid Space Centre. The nanosatellite will
incorporate a novel autonomous attitude determination and control system. This
will be the first flight of this system. Additionally it will carry a UHF to
VHF linear transponder that will have up to 0.5 watt output and which can be
used by Radio Amateurs worldwide for SSB and CW communications.
A launch is planned for the first half 2016 on the SpaceX Falcoln 9 SHERPA
mission with deployment into an elliptical, sun synchronous, Low Earth Orbit
(LEO) of about 450 by 720 km.

Follow Nayif-1 on Twitter
https://twitter.com/Nayifone

Frequency information
Nayif-1

YouthConnect at Expo 2020 Dubai
http://expo2020dubai.ae/en/news/article/expo_2020_dubai_unveils_youthconnect

[ANS thanks AMSAT-UK for the above information]

———————————————————————

DeorbitSail Update and Initial Camera Image

Chris Bridges 2E0OBC of the Surrey Space Centre provides this update on the
status of the DeorbitSail Cubesat.

Dear AMSAT Community,

We would like to express our gratitude for your cooperation in the DeorbitSail
project, and update you on the status of the mission.

As you know the DOS mission was launched on 10th July. After 4 months of
operations, the satellite is healthy and stable, although unfortunately we have
not been able to meet all of the mission objectives. Initial contact with the
satellite was established relatively smoothly and we received a lot of good
data, both through our own ground station but also via the network of you radio
amateurs who have been very generous with your time and help.

We achieved a power stable state early on, with good comms (uplink and
downlink) established within the first few days. We deployed the solar panels
successfully, and managed to return to a good and stable power state after
deployment. The ADCS has been challenging from the start, and continues to be
challenging – we have struggled to accurately determine the satellite tumble
rate and get it under control (more detail on that is included below). We know
that the satellite has seen some very high spin rates for various reasons,
including some inherent design/magnetic characteristics which have become
apparent.

Despite many attempts, we have unfortunately not been able to deploy the sail,
and having recently thoroughly analysed and investigated the possible causes,
mission events and ground test data and history, we are now reaching the
conclusion that achieving successful sail deployment is very unlikely. Again
there is more detail on that in the main body of text below.

We thank you for your patience and would like to apologise for not keeping
you updated on mission progress as often as we’d hoped. The operations phase
has been a learning and sometimes stressful experience for all of the team at
SSC, with a lot of head scratching and sleepless nights involved.

Here is some more detailed information regarding what progress and
achievements have been made during the operations to date.

• After the launch on the 10th of July, and the first week in orbit, with a
power safe and healthy satellite, the operation passed from the LEOP phase to
the ADCS Commissioning phase. This second phase was estimated to last between
three and four weeks; this proved to be optimistic.

• Although the spin up of the S/C was much higher than expected and saturated
the sensors, the SU simulations and the available data suggested a large Z-spin
rate on DOS which was confirmed by the B-field and MEMS magnetometry
measurements. To induce a bigger difference in the Moments of Inertia (MoI) of
the two non-longitudinal axes, the decision was taken to deploy the solar
panels. This operation was performed the 10th of August.

• More than a month after the launch the satellite was really healthy, power
safe and with great comms through newly developed software defined radio and
database backend operations. Although the stabilization wasn’t achieved even
with the solar panel deployment, at one month from the launch the team decide
to proceed with the sail deployment.

• This decision was agreed with DLR that confirmed that tumbling rates were no
issue for the sail deployment, because the Moments of Inertia increase rapidly
slowing down the tumble rate. DLR has performed a deployment test on Gossamer
while tumbling before coming to this opinion.

• On the 15th of August, the first attempt for sail deployment was performed,
the command was sent and the acknowledgement from the S/C was received, but no
current was drawn from the boom deployer motor. Multiple experiments were
performed to try and determine the cause of sail deployment failure.

• At this point, after a thorough investigation, the most plausible hypothesis
and justification seems to be a physical disconnection of the motor cables.
(Note that after the vibration test, it wasn’t possible to physically inspect
the connection due to the design itself of the S/C)

Our simulations showed that with the actual configuration (deployed solar
panels, undeployed sail) the decay time should be 20 years circa.

The aim now is to exercise and exploit the parts of the satellite that are
working, and gain more confidence and experience with the SU ADCS system, the
ISIS TRXUV and solar panels, and the SSC SDR groundstation and database tools
to explore better the interaction of the panel circuitry with the attitude
stabilisation. That will allow us to improve our performances in the next
missions.

From here, the team have worked hard to take images of the Earth and via SU’s
CubeSense camera – which we are delighted to show you today. This would not be
possible without the dedication from the SSC team here and, of course, the
amateur telemetry you kindly send us. We are going to continue imaging and
testing at higher resolutions too so watch this space.

We thank you for all the support.

Chiara Massimiani, DOS Project manager & Prof Guglielmo Aglietti SSC Director
and DOS PI

DeorbitSail
DeorbitSail

Surrey Space Centre
http://www.surrey.ac.uk/ssc/research/space_vehicle_control/deorbitsail/

[ANS thanks AMSAT-UK for the above information]

———————————————————————

SPROUT SSTV and Digitalker active every Sunday

Slow Scan TV (SSTV) images in Scottie 1 format will be transmitted from the
SPROUT satellite every Sunday (Japanese Standard Time) on 437.600 MHz FM (+/- 9
kHz Doppler shift). The Digitalker will also be active.

SPROUT, a 20 x 20 x 22 cm amateur radio nano-satellite with a mass of 7.1 kg,
launched successfully with the L-band (1236.5 MHz/1257.5 MHz/1278.5 MHz)
Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) satellite ALOS-2 on May 24, 2014 at 0305 UT.
SPROUT is in a 654 km, 97.9 degree inclination Sun Synchronous Orbit (SSO).

SPROUT (Space Research On Unique Technology) was built by students from Nihon
University and its objectives are:
1. Operation of satellite by radio amateurs.
A FM Digitalker will enable the satellite to speak to amateurs around the world.
The Voice Message Box will record transmissions from radio amateurs and play
them back.
Pre-loaded images from the Message Gallery can be transmitted using Slow Scan
TV (SSTV).
Pictures of the Earth can be transmitted by SSTV and radio amateurs can
receive it using free software such as MMSSTV. As part of the Earth mapping
project the team ask radio amateurs to contribute pictures they have received
from the satellite for display on the SPROUT website.
The satellite also has a packet radio Digipeater and Text Message Box function.

2. Demonstration of the deployment of the combined membrane structure and
verification of the design method of the structure SPROUT has a triangular
membrane supported by two tubes like framework. They are folded and
stored in the satellite before the launch. After the launch, the nitrogen gas
is injected into the tubes in space, and they extend, so that the membrane
deploys (called “combined membrane structure”).

3. Demonstration of attitude determination and control of a nanosatellite
using the sun sensors, gyros, geomagnetic sensor and magnetic torquers.

Callsign: JQ1ZJQ
Size: 214x210x220 mm
Weight: 7.1 kg
Mode: 1200bps AFSK, 9600bps GMSK
CW downlink 437.525 MHz
FM packet downlink 437.525 MHz
Digipeater uplink 437.600 MHz
Digitalker downlink 437.600 MHz
SSTV downlink 437.600 MHz

SPROUT English website
http://sat.aero.cst.nihon-u.ac.jp/sprout-e/

SPROUT Japanese website
http://sat.aero.cst.nihon-u.ac.jp/sprout/

Nihon-Univ. Miyazaki Laboratory on Facebook
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Nihon-Univ-Miyazaki-Laboratory/406566642818860

Telemetry Software
http://sat.aero.cst.nihon-u.ac.jp/sprout-e/2-Software-e.html

Telemetry format
http://sat.aero.cst.nihon-u.ac.jp/sprout-e/2-Formats%20of%20telemetry-e.html

SPROUT launch data page
http://sat.aero.cst.nihon-u.ac.jp/sprout-e/2-Launch%20data-e.html

TLE’s from the North American Aerospace Defence Command (NORAD) are also
available at
http://celestrak.com/NORAD/elements/tle-new.txt

Free Slow Scan TV (SSTV) software MMSSTV
http://hamsoft.ca/pages/mmsstv.php

The JE9PEL website has information on other satellites on this launch
http://www.ne.jp/asahi/hamradio/je9pel/jaxalos2.htm

[ANS thanks AMSAT-UK for the above information]

———————————————————————

AMSAT Events

Information about AMSAT activities at other important events around
the country. Examples of these events are radio club meetings where
AMSAT Area Coordinators give presentations, demonstrations of working
amateur satellites, and hamfests with an AMSAT presence (a table with
AMSAT literature and merchandise, sometimes also with presentations,
forums, and/or demonstrations).

*Saturday, 5 December 2015 – Superstition Superfest 2015 in Mesa AZ

*Saturday, 9 January 2016 – Thunderbird Hamfest 2016 in Phoenix AZ

*Friday and Saturday, 19-20 February 2016 – Yuma Hamfest and 2016 ARRL
Southwest Division Convention in Yuma AZ

*Saturday and Sunday, 12-13 March 2016 – ScienceCity science fair, on
the University of Arizona campus in Tucson AZ

*Saturday, 19 March 2016 – Scottsdale Amateur Radio Club Spring
Hamfest 2016 in Scottsdale AZ

*Saturday, 26 March 2016 – Tucson Spring Hamfest in Tucson AZ

[ANS thanks AMSAT-NA for the above information]

———————————————————————

ARISS News

Successful Contacts

* Kiluutaq School, Umiujaq, Nunavik Quebec, Canada, telebridge via W6SRJ
The ISS callsign was NA1SS
The scheduled astronaut was Kimiya Yui KG5BPH
Contact was successful: Tue 2015-11-17 16:47:02 UTC 41 deg

We are students from Kiluutaq school. Our school is located in the village of
Umiujaq. This is a small village of about 460 people in northern Quebec
(Canada). In winter, we use special clothes to go hunting. We hunt seals,
belugas, caribou, fish and foxes. In addition, every year we celebrate the
blueberry festival and we pick a lot of blueberries. Our village is very
special since we are talking 3 different languages: Inuttitut, English and
French. In our village there are two stores, a school, an arena, an airport,a
health center and a community center.

Steve, VE3TBD reported:
Contact went well… very well in fact.

All questions answered – 13
140 students.
50 parents.

Astronaut was a little low at times but overall very good. I heard him well
but I know the many languages and cultures do influence how we hear things –
very interesting to have the French, English and native languages involved.
Our humanoid robot did a very god job of getting the students up for event.
Presentations were undertaken in both English and local language.
My thanks goes to the very excellent job by Radio Station W6SRJ, Moderator
Brian Jackson and all else connected and involved.

* A direct contact via OEØARISS with students at BORG Monsbergergasse, Graz,
Austria, was successful Mon 2015-11-09 09:42:15 UTC 49 deg. Astronaut Kjell
Lindgren KO5MOS answered 11 questions for students.

The BORG Monsbergergasse is a grammar school in Graz, Monsbergergasse 16. Graz
is the second largest city in Austria, located in the southeast of the country.
The school can easily be reached from everywhere in Graz using public transport.
About 800 students attend the school and there are about 100 teachers. Our
students can choose between 5 different areas of interest: sports, science,
music, art and informatics. After four to five years the students graduate from
school after taking their A-levels.
The school offers a fantastic infrastructure for the students. Apart from the
classrooms there is a lab, a library and a cafeteria. There are special
computer rooms, four gyms and outside there are several courts for doing
sports. Besides there is a garden to relax in the breaks.

Upcoming Contacts

* Scuola Media Statale “G. Marconi”, Soleto, Lecce, Italy, And, Scuola
Secondaria di Primo Grado “Benedetto Croce”, Civate, Italy, telebridge via
VK4KHZ
The ISS callsign is presently scheduled to be NA1SS
The scheduled astronaut is Kimiya Yui KG5BPH
Contact is a go for: Mon 2015-11-23 09:21:53 UTC 87 deg

The event will be webcast on:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qkFhGc2nes4

* Dragonskolan, Umeå, Sweden, telebridge via VE4ISS
The ISS callsign is presently scheduled to be NA1SS
The scheduled astronaut is Kjell Lindgren KO5MOS
Contact is a go: Tue 2015-11-24 09:44:25 UTC 78 deg

Watch
http://www.ariss.org/upcoming-contacts.html
for information about upcoming contacts as they are scheduled.

[ANS thanks ARISS, and Charlie, AJ9N for the above information]

———————————————————————

* Satellite Shorts From All Over

* W5PFG Plans Satellite Operation From South Padre Island

IOTA NA-092 – (Satellite Op) Clayton, W5PFG, will operate portable from
South Padre Island, Texas, in EL16 between November 22-26th. He plans to
operate several passes a day from EL15, covering the southern-most tip of
Texas. An operation from EL06 is possible sometime in the beginning of that
week. You can follow his operation on Twitter
starting November 21st. It’s possible he will operate once or twice while
enroute. Clayton will try to work as many different satellites as possible.
He tends to favor FO-29, typically 15-20 kHz above the center of the
transponder.

[ANS thanks Ohio/Penn DX Bulletin No. 1240 for the above information]

———————————————————————

/EX

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the
President’s Club. Members of the President’s Club, as sustaining
donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive addi-
tional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT
Office.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership
at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students
enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the stu-
dent rate for a maximum of 6 post-secondary years in this status.
Contact Martha at the AMSAT Office for additional student membership
information.

73,
This week’s ANS Editor,
Joe Spier, K6WAO
k6wao at amsat dot org

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE SPECIAL BULLETIN
ANS-321

The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and infor-
mation service of AMSAT North America, The Radio Amateur Satellite
Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in Space
including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur
Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building,
launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio
satellites.

The news feed on http://www.amsat.org publishes news of Amateur
Radio in Space as soon as our volunteers can post it.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to:
ans-editor at amsat.org.

In this edition:

* AO-85 Commissioned, Handed Over To AMSAT-NA Operations

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-321.01
ANS-321 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 321.01
From AMSAT HQ KENSINGTON, MD.
November 17, 2015
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-321.01

AO-85 Commissioned, Handed Over To AMSAT-NA Operations

AO-85 has been formally commissioned and turned over to AMSAT
Operations, who are now responsible for the scheduling and modes.

The following guidelines are provided for users:

Uplink power should be on the order of minimum 200 W EIRP for full
quieting at lower antenna elevation angles. Your mileage may vary.
With an Arrow, 5 W has been used successfully to make contacts.

Polarity is important. The satellite antennas are linear. So, if you
are using linearly polarized antennas, you will need to adjust
throughout the pass. Full duplex operation facilitates these
adjustments while transmitting and is highly recommended.

The downlink is very strong and should be heard well with almost any
antenna.

Downlink audio is 5 kHz deviation, as expected. Many will perceive
that the audio is “low.” This is an effect of the filtering below 300
Hz, which provides for the DUV telemetry, coupled with any noise on
the uplink signal resulting from lack of full quieting or being off
frequency. That makes for less fidelity than a typical receiver in
terms of audio frequencies passed.

Transmit (downlink) frequency varies with temperature. Due to the
wide range of temperatures we are seeing in the eclipse cycle, the
transmitter can be anywhere from around 500 Hz low at 10°C to near 2
kHz low at 40°C.

Receive frequency has been generally agreed to be about 435.170 MHz,
although the AFC makes that hard to pin down and also helps with the
uplinks that are off frequency.

Probably the most notable observations about AO-85 are an apparent
lack of sensitivity and difficulty in turning on the repeater with
the 67 Hz CTCSS when it is not yet activated, or holding it on by the
presence of the CTCSS. We have determined a probable cause for the
sensitivity issue and while that can’t be fixed on AO-85 we are
taking steps to prevent similar issues on the rest of the Fox-1
CubeSats. The tone detection threshold along with the receive
sensitivity issue makes it hard to bring up the repeater. This is
being addressed by adjusting the values for a valid tone detection in
the other Fox-1 CubeSats now that we have on orbit information about
temperatures and power budget. Full details will be in the Nov/Dec
AMSAT Journal.

It is important to remember that science is the reason behind the
Fox-1 satellites. Not only does science help with the launch cost, it
provides a great amount of educational value both from the science
payload and in amateur radio itself. The data-under-voice (DUV)
telemetry is an excellent way to provide the science without
sacrificing the use of the satellite for communications, which would
be the case if higher speed downlinks were needed. DUV provides
constant science as long as the repeater is in use, which in turn
provides more downlink data for the science – a mutually beneficial
combination.

Fox-1A is AMSAT-NA’s first CubeSat. Many new techniques are
incorporated and lessons will be learned, as with any new “product.”
The Fox-1 Project is a series of CubeSats. A total of five will be
built and flown. Launches are scheduled for three more, and a new
NASA CubeSat Launch Initiative proposal will be submitted for the
fifth. We will incorporate changes from what we learn in each launch,
to the extent possible, in subsequent Fox-1 CubeSats.

Of the four NASA sponsored CubeSats on the ELaNa XII launch October
8, we are sad to report that ARC1 was never heard from and BisonSat
was lost after a few weeks of operation. AMSAT extends our deepest
sympathy to the people who worked so hard on these projects. To our
members, we want to say that the Fox Team is very proud and pleased
that our first CubeSat is very successful and hopefully will be for
some time.

[ANS thanks Jerry NoJY for the above information]

———————————————————————

/EX

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the
President’s Club. Members of the President’s Club, as sustaining
donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive addi-
tional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT
Office.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership
at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students
enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the stu-
dent rate for a maximum of 6 post-secondary years in this status.
Contact Martha at the AMSAT Office for additional student membership
information.

73,
This week’s ANS Editor,
EMike McCardel, KC8YLD
kc8yld at amsat dot org

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE
ANS-319

The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and infor-
mation service of AMSAT North America, The Radio Amateur Satellite
Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in Space
including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur
Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building,
launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio
satellites.

The news feed on http://www.amsat.org publishes news of Amateur
Radio in Space as soon as our volunteers can post it.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to:
ans-editor at amsat.org.

In this edition:

* EO-79 CubeSat Update
* QB50 Frequency Table
* Newsline Interview With ISS First School Contact Teacher
* Signal Reports Requested From IO-86 FM Transponder Test
* ARISS Contact Featured in ARRL Radio Waves Newsletter
* McMurdo completes MEOSAR satellite ground station in New Zealand

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-319.01
ANS-319 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 319.01
From AMSAT HQ Kensington, MD.
November 15, 2015
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-319.01

EO-79 CubeSat Update

Wouter Weggelaar PA3WEG has provided this update on the status and plans for
QB50p1 – EO-79.

Earlier testing campaigns indicate that the AMSAT-UK/AMSAT-NL transponder on
board of this spacecraft is in good health. We have activated the transponder on
various occasions for testing purposes.

At the moment we believe the power system is capable of sustaining transponder
operations indefinitely. ISIS (the satellite designer and operator) still needs
to write and apply a software patch that would keep the transponder running. The
current logic in the satellite will switch off the transponder if a reset occurs
of the On Board Computer or power system.

Efforts are being made to allow usage of the transponder in the mean time and
also allow select command stations to take the satellite out of safe mode if it
does reset. ISIS will continue to monitor all telemetry and the satellites
health.

The precursor satellites have gathered valuable data about the sensor payloads,
and the lessons learnt are being implemented in the flight units for the QB50
main mission.

We will still have to wait until procedures are in place and the activation is
cleared by the operator and owners of the satellite, but we are nearly ready for
the activation of another transponder!

Transponder activations will be announced on the AMSAT Bulletin Board.

On behalf of AMSAT-NL and the ISIS operations team I would like to thank the
community for supporting our mission and thank you for your patience.

[ANS thanks Wouter, PA3WEG, for the above information]

———————————————————————

QB50 Frequency Table

Here is a link worth keeping an eye on as the QB50 launch in 2016 gets
closer. JE9PEL has a page documenting the frequencies of the 50 cubesats at:

http://www.ne.jp/asahi/hamradio/je9pel/qb50sats.htm

[ANS thanks Mineo Wakita, JE9PEL, for the above information]

———————————————————————

Newsline Interview With ISS First School Contact Teacher

This week’s Amateur Radio Newsline Report 1985 November 13, 2015 includes an
interview with Rita Wright, KC9CDL, the science teacher who was lucky enough to
help her students be chosen to talk with ISS astronaut William M. “Shep”
Shepherd, KD5GSL, for the first school contact with the International Space
Station.

Amateur Radio Newsline has this week’s bulletins posted at:

http://www.arnewsline.org/news/2015/11/13/amateur-radio-newsline-report-1985-
november-13-2015.html

Select ‘Script’ or ‘Audio’ to access the newscast as desired.

[ANS thanks the Amateur Radio Newsline for the above information]

———————————————————————

Signal Reports Requested From IO-86 FM Transponder Test

The FM transponder aboard IO-86/LAPAN-ORARI was activated for testing, and was
available for amateur radio use on 14 November 2015 between 01:35 UTC – 03:40
UTC. This satellite is in a 6° inclination orbit so only stations in equatorial
regions have access. Station in far southern United States may have access.

+ Uplink: 145.880Mhz with 88.5 Hz tone
+ Downlink: 435.880 Mhz

If you heard IO-86 or had any contacts please e-mail signal reports to
yd1eee@gmail.com

The two-line Keplerian elements are:

IO-86
1 40931U 15052B 15316.15776324 .00001070 00000-0 60618-4 0 9994
2 40931 6.0030 69.3893 0012877 275.6206 84.2533 14.76374433 6653

These are also included in the keps download available from www.amsat.org

[ANS thanks Dirgantara Rahadian. YE0EEE for the above information]

———————————————————————

ARISS Contact Featured in ARRL Radio Waves Newsletter

The American Radio Relay League’s Fall 2015 issue of “Radio Waves”, a newsletter
for teachers, license instructors, and radio science education features coverage
of the ARISS contact with Tulsa Community College. The PDF issue can be accessed
at:
http://www.arrl.org/radio-waves

[ANS thanks the ARRL for the above information]

———————————————————————

McMurdo completes MEOSAR satellite ground station in New Zealand

The legacy of AMSAT OSCAR 6 & 7 in demonstrating satellite based Doppler
location of ground transmitters for search-and-rescue operations in the 1970s
set the stage for the Cospas-Sarsat system which is now entering into the next
stage of evolution.

McMurdo’s next-generation MEOSAR satellite ground station system installation in
New Zealand will reduce rescue times in one of the world’s most active search
and rescue regions.

McMurdo has announced that it has completed the installation of a six-antenna
next-generation Medium-Earth Orbit Search and Rescue (MEOSAR) satellite ground
station system in New Zealand.

The project, which is part of a joint initiative with Maritime New Zealand and
the Australian Maritime Safety Authority, is expected to significantly boost
search and rescue capability in the New Zealand and Australia search regions and
marks the first implementation of MEOSAR in Asia Pacific. MEOSAR is the next-
generation version of Cospas-Sarsat, the international search and rescue
satellite system that has helped to save 37,000 lives since 1982.

In a typical satellite-based search and rescue scenario, ships, aircraft or
individuals transmit distress signals from an emergency location beacon via
satellite to a fixed ground receiving station or local user terminal. The ground
station receives and calculates the location of the distress signal and creates
and sends an alert to the appropriate rescue authorities.

Today, the beacon-to-alert process depends on a limited number of Low Earth
Orbit (LEO) satellites and may take several hours before a position is
confirmed. With MEOSAR, beacon signals will be received more quickly and beacon
locations identified with greater accuracy thereby reducing this time to
minutes.

The New Zealand MEOSAR system, and another being installed in Western Australia,
will cover one of the largest search and rescue areas in the world – from north
of Australia/New Zealand to the Equator and south to the South Pole, east to
half way across the Pacific, and west half way across the Indian Ocean. The
systems will undergo rigorous testing before being officially brought online in
late 2017 by Cospas-Sarsat.

[ANS thanks SpaceDaily for the above information]

/EX

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the
President’s Club. Members of the President’s Club, as sustaining
donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive addi-
tional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT
Office.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership
at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students
enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the stu-
dent rate for a maximum of 6 post-secondary years in this status.
Contact Martha at the AMSAT Office for additional student membership
information.

73,
This week’s ANS Editor,
Lee McLamb, KU4OS
ku4os at amsat dot org

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE
ANS-312

The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and infor-
mation service of AMSAT North America, The Radio Amateur Satellite
Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in Space
including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur
Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building,
launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio
satellites.

The news feed on http://www.amsat.org publishes news of Amateur
Radio in Space as soon as our volunteers can post it.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to:
ans-editor at amsat.org.

In this edition:

* AO-85 Testing November 8 and 9
* US Radio Amateurs Back in Space and SA AMSAT Kletskous Update
* SAREX Reflector Has Been Shut Down
* ISS Astronauts Link-Up with ITU WRC-15 in Geneva
* Help Wanted Astronauts
* QB50 project 2016
* BRICSAT-1 recovery challenge
* Hawaii Launch of Satellites Carrying Amateur Radio Payloads Fails
* ARISS News
* Satellite Shorts From All Over

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-312
ANS-312 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 312
From AMSAT HQ KENSINGTON, MD.
November 8, 2015
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-312

AO-85 Testing November 8 and 9

*Summary of AO-85 testing:*

* Please do not try to uplink to AO-85 during the following times
(all of which occur while AO-85 is over North America) even though
the transponder will be active and you may hear activity.

*Sunday November 8, 15:35 through 15:55 UTC*
*Sunday November 8, 17:15 through 17:35 UTC*
*Monday November 9, 00:05 through 00:25 UTC*
*Monday November 9, 01:45 through 02:10 UTC*

All dates and times are UTC, all passes are Sunday local time in
North America. Stations in North, Central, and northern South America
are asked to comply.

You are encouraged to copy telemetry with FoxTelem during these
times to forward to the server to help us analyze the test results.

*Details of this AO-85 testing:*

Sunday, November 8 and into early Monday, November 9 (UTC) the Fox-1
Engineering Team will be testing the COR (carrier operated relay)
mode of AO-85. COR is the backup to the IHU failing, if IHU fails AO-
85 should continue operating as a simple COR repeater with no CTCSS
necessary as long as there is power. In COR mode no telemetry or
voice ID is present because those are generated by the IHU.

Orbit 443 ascending, at approximately 15:35 UTC over North America we
will test a telemetry high/low reset command. Following the command
look for Ground Resets = 2 in the Computer window of FoxTelem. Once
that is confirmed, we will command the IHU OFF on the same pass.

Please keep the uplink clear in order to help us test and monitor
the telemetry.

Orbit 444 ascending, at approximately 17:15 UTC over North America
AMSAT command and engineering stations will test the COR mode on the
air to observe performance. Please keep the uplink clear so that we
may test without interference, to expedite the testing and allow for
good measurements. We may command IHU ON during the pass in order to
observe battery voltage in the telemetry. Please have FoxTelem
running even if there is no telemetry seen, it may turn on at any
time during this pass.

Orbit 448 descending, at approximately 00:05 UTC Monday over North
America we will command AO-85 IHU ON. Please keep the uplink clear in
order to help us test and monitor the telemetry after the IHU is
turned on.

Orbit 449 descending, at approximately 01:45 UTC Monday over North
America if we were unable to command IHU ON on orbit 448, we will
attempt to command again. Please keep the uplink clear in order to
help us test and monitor the telemetry after the IHU is turned on.

During the testing stations outside North, Central and northern South
America are invited to use the COR repeater mode and share your
assessment of AO-85 receive sensitivity and audio on amsat-bb.
Stations in North, Central, and northern South America may use the COR
repeater on orbits 445 through 447 and are also invited to share your
assessment of AO-85 receive sensitivity and audio on amsat-bb.

Please share this widely to help reach everyone who may be operating
AO-85.

The AO-85 team thanks you for your support.

[ANS thanks Jerry N0JY for the above information]

———————————————————————

US Radio Amateurs Back in Space and SA AMSAT Kletskous Update

The launch of the Fox 1A CubeSat on 8 October 2015 marked the return
of satellites built by AMSAT North America (Amateur Radio Satellite
Corporation). US amateurs were the first to build and launch
satellites just a few years after the Russians stunned the world with
Sputnik 1 in 1957. For several decades they led the pack and built
bigger and better satellite. That that came to an end some five years
ago when free rides into space dried up.

AMSAT had to refocus its activities and look at CubeSat as the best
alternative possible option as free and more affordable launches
became available. One of the options is the NASA ELaNa program.
NASA and the Launch Services Program are partnering with several
universities to launch small research satellites. These missions
provide NASA with valuable opportunities to test emerging
technologies and economical commercial off-the-shelf components that
may be useful in future space missions. NASA nanosatellites are
designed for a wide spectrum of space missions, including biology
experiments, testing advanced propulsion and communications
technologies.

CubeSats are only 10 x 10 x 10 cm and weigh under 1,3 kg. NASA’s
Kennedy Space Centre in Florida has adapted the Poly-Picosatellite
Orbital Deployer (PPOD) to put these CubeSats into orbit. This
deployment system was designed and is manufactured by the California
Polytechnic State University in partnership with Stanford University.

Fox-1A was launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base as part of the
ELaNa-XII group of satellites. In addition, Fox-1C and Fox-1D are now
scheduled to fly together under contract with Spaceflight, which is
expected to launch in first quarter 2016. Fox 1B also known as
RadFXSat has been assigned a launch that is currently expected to take
place in November 2016 from Vandenberg Air Force Base as part of
ELaNa-XIV.

“The next 14 months will be rewarding ones for our volunteers, who
spent countless hours designing, documenting, collaborating,
fabricating, testing and integrating ourFox-1 design into flight
hardware,” AMSAT president Barry Baines said. “These satellites will
be used by radio amateurs, students, and scientists who will benefit
from amateur radio capabilities on board, educational opportunities
that our spacecraft can provide to the classroom, and the scientific
data that will be available from payloads on board provided by
university students and faculties,” he said.

Organizationally, AMSAT has benefited tremendously from the Fox-1
program as it provides the basis for training anew generation of
satellite builders who are now seasoned veterans, capable of tackling
more complex and challenging projects.

“AMSAT’s reputation as a satellite innovator is enhanced as the Fox-1
design allows seamless integration of scientific payloads that can
benefit from a reliable communications downlink capable of low speed
and high speed data transmissions,” Baines said.

Fox-1A is the first FM repeater satellite in a 1U CubeSat form
factor, capable of sending low speed telemetry as well as payload
data while the FM repeater is in normal amateur service.

Fox-1B will fly with the Vanderbilt University radiation experiments
expected in 2016. Fox-1C will launch on Spaceflight’s maiden mission
of the SHERPA multi-cubesat deployer planned for the 1st quarter of
2016. U- and L-band uplinks with the VHF band downlink will be
available. Fox-1D will launch with Fox-1C. It will include the
University of Iowa HERCI experiment. IA Virginia Tech camera will
also be included. U- and L- band uplinks with the VHF band downlink
will be available. Fox-1E “Evolution” will carry a Mode J linear
transponder. The transponder is planned to be 30 kHz wide and will
also have a 1200 bps BPSK telemetry beacon.

South African AMSAT’s (SA AMSAT) CubeSat, named Kletskous
(chatterbox) is making good progress with the third generation space
frame to be completed before the end of the year. Good progress is
being made with all the subsystems and it is expected that by the end
of February 2016, a breadboard layout will be tested. The breadboard
layout is also referred to as flatsat as all the subsystems are wired
together on the test bench and tested as a fully operational satellite.

SA AMSAT is also planning to include experimental projects and is
inviting high school learners and tertiary education students to
submit proposals for their science project to be included in
Kletskous and make use of the transponder facilities to have the data
of their projects downloaded as part of the telemetry stream. Because
of the size of a CubeSat and the limited power budget available,
proposals must be for projects which have few components and require
little power.

For more details about Kletskous visit
www.amsatsa.org.za.
Proposals should be submitted to saamsat@intekom.co.za and reach the
Kletskous team by 28 February 2016.

See:

US radio amateurs back in Space

[ANS thanks Hans, ZS6AKV for the above information]

———————————————————————

SAREX Reflector Has Been Shut Down

As previously announced the SAREX Reflector was shut down November
1. What follows is Frank Bauer’s KA3HDO, AMSAT V.P. for Human
Spaceflight Programs and the ARISS International Chair, final
comments to the SAREX Reflector.

“SAREX Reflector Participants:

As previously announced, on November 1, 2015 we are shutting down
the SAREX Reflector for future message postings. This posting
represents the SAREX reflector’s last message.

It is not clear when the SAREX reflector was first started, but from
a query to Paul Williamson, who started all the AMSAT reflectors, it
has been in operation since at least 1992.

Over the years, many of you have used this forum to gather and share
information on our “frequent flyer” SAREX missions on the Shuttle,
our operations on the Space Station Mir and, since 2000, our
operations on ISS. But times have changed since the early 1990s.
For starters, we have moved from the SAREX activities on the Shuttle
to ARISS on the International Space Station. AMSAT, ARRL and the
ARISS international team of volunteers have also transitioned our
ARISS communications to you and are providing you many ways to get
information on ARISS. This includes the ARISS Web Site
www.ariss.org, the ISS Fan Club web site www.issfanclub.com and the
AMSAT web site, www.amsat.org. The ARISS team noticed that many on
the AMSAT BB reflector were not seeing late-breaking opportunities
for ARISS connections (School, SSTV, QSOs) unless these messages were
cross-posted between SAREX and BB. So the decision was made by me to
move all the SAREX real-time traffic over to BB and to end the SAREX
reflector postings on this date.

Before we hit “send” and closeout this reflector, I encourage you to
sign up and continue to get these messages on AMSAT-BB. If you feel
there is too much traffic on BB, you can always sign up for the
digest mode, which combines many messages and sends them out
periodically (usually daily). And don’t forget that the SAREX
archives will still be available on the AMSAT web site, so you can
research past messages.

On behalf of AMSAT-NA and the ARISS International Team, I want to
thank you for your sustained participation in this phenomenal amateur
radio human spaceflight journey. Moreover, we look forward to your
further participation and volunteer support in the future.

While there are many ARISS volunteers to thank for their outstanding
support, I want to send a particular shout out to Charlie Sufana,
AJ9N, who has provided all SAREX reflector participants frequent
updates on ARISS status. Thanks Charlie!

As I close this final e-mail, I want to announce that over the next
couple months, ARISS will be celebrating its 15ths anniversary of
continuous operations on the ISS, starting with November 13, 2015
when we conducted our first ham radio contacts on ISS and on December
21, 2000 when we conducted our first school contact with the Burbank
School in Burbank, Illinois. Stay tuned on BB and our web site for
ham radio activities that we will be conducting over the year to
commemorate these historic events.

73,

Frank H. Bauer, KA3HDO
AMSAT V.P. for Human Spaceflight Programs
ARISS International Chair”

[ANS thanks SAREX and Frank KA3HDO for the above information]

———————————————————————

ISS Astronauts Link-Up with ITU WRC-15 in Geneva

The ITU World Radiocommunication Conference 2015 (WRC-15) is taking
place in Geneva from November 2-27. On Tuesday, November 3 at 1241 UT
there was an amateur radio link-up between WRC-15 and two astronauts
on the International Space Station (ISS).

The contact took place using the permanent amateur radio station at
the ITU. The station’s normal call sign is 4U1ITU but during the
conference the special call sign 4U1WRC is being used.

Students from Institut Florimont were able to use the ITU station to
talk to astronauts Kjell Lindgren KO5MOS and Kimiya Yui KG5BPH who
were using the amateur radio station in the ISS Columbus module,
call sign OR4ISS.

The Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) program
established the first permanent amateur radio presence in space 15
years ago. The inaugural ARISS contact took place on December 21,
2000, between a member of the ISS Expedition 1 crew and youngsters at
Luther Burbank Elementary School near Chicago. Several pupils and a
teacher got to chat using amateur radio with “Space Station Alpha”
Commander William “Shep” Shepherd KD5GSL.
The ARISS program lets students worldwide experience the excitement
of talking directly with crew members of the International Space
Station, inspiring them to pursue interests in careers in science,
technology, engineering and math, and engaging them with radio
science technology through amateur radio.

A video of the contact event can be viewed at:

[ANS thanks AMSAT-UK and WRC15 for the above information]

———————————————————————

Help Wanted Astronauts

NASA Press Release: Job Openings for Astronauts

In anticipation of returning human spaceflight launches to American
soil, and in preparation for the agency’s journey to Mars, NASA
announced it will soon begin accepting applications for the next
class of astronaut candidates. With more human spacecraft in
development in the United States today than at any other time in
history, future astronauts will launch once again from the Space
Coast of Florida on American-made commercial spacecraft, and carry
out deep-space exploration missions that will advance a future human
mission to Mars.

The agency will accept applications from Dec. 14 through mid-
February and expects to announce candidates selected in mid-2017.
Applications for consideration as a NASA Astronaut will be accepted
at:

http://www.usajobs.gov

The next class of astronauts may fly on any of four different U.S.
vessels during their careers: the International Space Station, two
commercial crew spacecraft currently in development by U.S.
companies, and NASA’s Orion deep-space exploration vehicle.

From pilots and engineers, to scientists and medical doctors, NASA
selects qualified astronaut candidates from a diverse pool of U.S.
citizens with a wide variety of backgrounds.

“This next group of American space explorers will inspire the Mars
generation to reach for new heights, and help us realize the goal of
putting boot prints on the Red Planet,” said NASA Administrator
Charles Bolden. “Those selected for this service will fly on U.S.
made spacecraft from American soil, advance critical science and
research aboard the International Space Station, and help push the
boundaries of technology in the proving ground of deep space.”

The space agency is guiding an unprecedented transition to
commercial spacecraft for crew and cargo transport to the space
station. Flights in Boeing’s CST-100 Starliner and SpaceX Crew Dragon
will facilitate adding a seventh crew member to each station mission,
effectively doubling the amount of time astronauts will be able to
devote to research in space.

Future station crew members will continue the vital work advanced
during the last 15 years of continuous human habitation aboard the
orbiting laboratory, expanding scientific knowledge and demonstrating
new technologies. This work will include building on the regular six-
month missions and this year’s one-year mission, currently underway
aboard the station, which is striving for research breakthroughs not
possible on Earth that will enable long-duration human and robotic
exploration into deep space.

In addition, NASA’s Space Launch System rocket and Orion spacecraft,
now in development, will launch astronauts on missions to the proving
ground of lunar orbit where NASA will learn to conduct complex
operations in a deep space environment before moving on to longer
duration missions on its journey to Mars.

“This is an exciting time to be a part of America’s human space
flight program,” said Brian Kelly, director of Flight Operations at
NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston. “NASA has taken the next step
in the evolution of our nation’s human spaceflight program – and our
U.S. astronauts will be at the forefront of these new and challenging
space flight missions. We encourage all qualified applicants to learn
more about the opportunities for astronauts at NASA and apply to join
our flight operations team.”

To date, NASA has selected more than 300 astronauts to fly on its
increasingly challenging missions to explore space and benefit life
on Earth. There are 47 astronauts in the active astronaut corps, and
more will be needed to crew future missions to the space station and
destinations in deep space.

Astronaut candidates must have earned a bachelor’s degree from an
accredited institution in engineering, biological science, physical
science or mathematics. An advanced degree is desirable. Candidates
also must have at least three years of related, progressively
responsible professional experience, or at least 1,000 hours of pilot-
in-command time in jet aircraft. Astronaut candidates must pass the
NASA long-duration spaceflight physical.

For more information about a career as a NASA astronaut, and
application requirements, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/astronauts

[ANS thanks NASA for the above information]

———————————————————————

QB50 project 2016

As reported to the AMSAT-BB, Mineo Wakita JE9PEL informs us “For the
purpose of the demonstration and development of CubeSats of the
technology of the universities around the world, it is scheduled to
be launched all 50 satellites by Ukraine Tsiklon-4 rocket on February
1, 2016. There are still also uncertainties, but I, JE9PEL
investigated the current frequencies and summarized it in an Excel
file. I’m going to issue in the future this revised version.”

http://www.ne.jp/asahi/hamradio/je9pel/51106qb5.png
http://www.ne.jp/asahi/hamradio/je9pel/51106qb5.xls
http://www2.jpl.nasa.gov/calendar/#1602

[ANS thanks Mineo JE9PEL for the above information]

———————————————————————

BRICSAT-1 recovery challenge

If anyone has 9600 baud satellite capability and is looking for a
challenge, you could be successful in recovering BRICSAT (NO83).
BRICSAT simply has a negative power budget. When it wakes up, it
should be possible to get in the command to tell it to turn off
unnecessary loads and then let it achieve full recovery. As is, it
wakes up, sends a few feeble 20 second packets and dies again.

Bricsat has another excellent PSK31 transpodner on it too. You can
detect BRICSAT when it awakes by the 20 second packet on the downlink
OR by the occasional PSK31 beacon on 435.350 MHz (+/- Doppler). Do
not be confused by PSAT which also has a PSK31 tranpsonder on the
same frequency. But they have different audio tones for the beacon.

> Downlink: 437.975 MHz, 9600 baud
> Uplink: 145.825 MHz, 9600 baud
> Latest “guess” at the TLE (not sure if this is BRICSat)
> 1 90722U 15294.38156592 +.00051032 +00000-0 +11686-2 0 0166
> 2 90722 054.9895 030.6075 0226665 199.3544 159.8861 15.1979213102332

The commands are simple keyboard dumb terminal commands.
If you think you want to take on this challenge, contact us.
(bruninga at usna.edu)

[ANS thanks Bob WB4APR and Jin KB3UKS for the above information]

———————————————————————

Hawaii Launch of Satellites Carrying Amateur Radio Payloads Fails

The November 4 inaugural launch of an experimental US military
vehicle carrying several satellites with Amateur Radio payloads into
orbit failed in mid-flight shortly after taking off at 0345 UTC from
Hawaii. The experimental Super Strypi launch vehicle, carrying a
collection of small satellites into orbit as part of the ORS-4
mission for the Department of Defense, was fired from a truss-mounted
rail system from the Pacific Missile Range Facility, off Barking
Sands on Kauai. According to Spaceflightnow.com, the Super Strypi
rocket is designed for low-cost, quick-reaction satellite launches.
Destroyed in the demonstration flight were 13 small research
spacecraft clustered on the mission for NASA researchers and
university students.

None of the satellites carried Amateur Radio transponders, but
several were equipped to transmit beacon signals and telemetry on 2
meter, 70 centimeter, and 13 centimeter amateur frequencies. The
satellites lost included Argus, EDSN, HawaiiSat-1, ORS-Squared,
PrintSat, STACEM, STU-1, and Supernova-Beta. PrintSat carried a 3D
printed structure and was designed to measure the performance of the
material over the course of its 3 year mission.

Spaceflightnow.com said the experimental launcher apparently lost
control and broke up downrange from the launch site. The November 4
maiden flight took place following several delays. The test flight
was one of two planned demonstrations of the launcher.

View the Super Strypi & ORS-4 Launch On PMRF 3 November 201 at

Spaceflightnow’s detailed coverage of the event can be found at
http://tinyurl.com/ANS312-Spaceflightnow

[ANS thanks ARRL Newsletter for the above information]

———————————————————————

ARISS News

+ The scheduled contact with Dragonskolan, Umeå, Sweden was postponed
because the scheduled astronaut was tied up in other activities. The
contact will be rescheduled for a later date.

+ A Successful contact was made between ITU World Radio
Communication Conference 2015 WRC-15, Geneva, Switzerland and
Astronaut Kimiya Yui KG5BPH using Callsign OR4ISS.
The contact began 2015-11-03 11:47 UTC and lasted about nine
and a half minutes. Contact was direct via 4U1WRC.
ARISS Mentor was ON4WF.

+ A Successful contact was made between Eleanor Palmer School,
London, United Kingdom and Astronaut Kjell Lindgren KO5MOS using
Callsign NA1SS.
The contact began 2015-11-03 11:47 UTC and lasted about nine
and a half minutes. Contact telebridged via VK6MJ.
ARISS Mentor was MØXTD.

Upcoming ARISS Contact Schedule

BORG Monsbergergasse, Graz, Austria, direct via OEØARISS. The ISS
callsign is presently scheduled to be OR4ISS. The scheduled
astronaut is Kjell Lindgren KO5MOS
Contact is a go for: Mon 2015-11-09 09:42:15 UTC

Ste. Genevieve du Bois Catholic Elementary School, Warson Woods,
Missouri, direct via NØKBA. The ISS callsign is presently scheduled
to be NA1SS. The scheduled astronaut is Kjell Lindgren KO5MOS
The contact is a go for: Thu 2015-11-12 16:25:16 UTC

[ANS thanks ARISS, Charlie AJ9N and David AA4KN for the above
information]

———————————————————————

Satellite Shorts From All Over

Very nice coverage, and features Keith, W5IU, with the ARISS contact
with Daggett Montessori School in Ft. Worth, Texas:

http://tinyurl.com/ANS312-DaggettMontessori

[ANS thanks JoAnne K9JKM and the Star-Telegram for the above
information]

ARISS Contact Documentary

WKTV did a really nice job producing a documentary of the October 23
ARISS contact with West Michigan Aviation Academy.
Here is a link to the youtube video.

[ANS thanks Les Brown, Chief Pilot, West Michigan Aviation Academy
and WKTV ro the above information]

———————————————————————

/EX

In addition to regular membership, AMSAT offers membership in the
President’s Club. Members of the President’s Club, as sustaining
donors to AMSAT Project Funds, will be eligible to receive addi-
tional benefits. Application forms are available from the AMSAT
Office.

Primary and secondary school students are eligible for membership
at one-half the standard yearly rate. Post-secondary school students
enrolled in at least half time status shall be eligible for the stu-
dent rate for a maximum of 6 post-secondary years in this status.
Contact Martha at the AMSAT Office for additional student membership
information.

73,
This week’s ANS Editor,
EMike McCardel, KC8YLD
kc8yld at amsat dot org

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE
ANS-305
The AMSAT News Service bulletins are a free, weekly news and infor-
mation service of AMSAT North America, The Radio Amateur Satellite
Corporation. ANS publishes news related to Amateur Radio in Space
including reports on the activities of a worldwide group of Amateur
Radio operators who share an active interest in designing, building,
launching and communicating through analog and digital Amateur Radio
satellites.

The news feed on http://www.amsat.org publishes news of Amateur
Radio in Space as soon as our volunteers can post it.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to:
ans-editor at amsat.org.

In this edition:

* Super Strypi (SPARK) Launch Planned for November 2, 2015
* Duchifat 1 status update
* UKube-1 CubeSat Completes Mission
* Fort Worth students talk to ISS
* Tim Peake KG5BVI and the ISS Astro Pi’s
* Radio amateurs to help London children talk to ISS
* AMSAT Events
* ARISS News

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-305.01
ANS-305 AMSAT News Service Weekly Bulletins

AMSAT News Service Bulletin 305.01
>From AMSAT HQ KENSINGTON, MD.
DATE November 1, 2015
To All RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-305.01

———————————————————————

Super Strypi (SPARK) Launch Planned for November 1, 2015

The following satellites are planned to be launched on 2, Nov 2015.

Argus, EDSN, HawaiiSat-1, ORS-Squared, PrintSat, STACEM, STU-1, Supernova-Beta
Site is Pacific Missile Range – Kokole Point, Kauai, Hawaii

Satellite Downlink Beacon Mode
———————- —————– ——- ————
Argus 2403.000-2403.400 437.290 1200bps AFSK
EDSN 2401.200-2431.200 437.100 1200bps AFSK
HawaiiSat1 (HiakaSat1) 145.9805 437.2705 9600bps GFSK
ORS-Squared 437.325 . 9600bps GMSK
PrintSat 437.325 . 9600bps GMSK
STACEM . . ?
STU-1 2402.000-2445.000 436.360 9600bps GMSK
Supernova-Beta 437.570 . 1200bps AFSK
———————- —————– ——- ————

HawaiiSat-1
1 99999U 00000 15306.00000000 .00002809 00000-0 69295-4 0 00007
2 99999 094.6040 077.7732 0056131 182.2912 079.1822 15.38919159000464

SPARK – Super Strypi


http://www.ne.jp/asahi/hamradio/je9pel/sparksat.htm
http://www.cubesat.org

[ANS thanks Mineo Wakita, JE9PEL for the above information]

———————————————————————

Duchifat 1 status update

We’re happy to report that the satellite is still operational and doing
very well.
We’ve already received 20 stations using Duchifat 1, and all said stations
are displayed on our map at
www.h-space-lab.org .
QSL cards are on their way, and a few have already been received.
It’s a fantastic experience to be heard by the satellite, get immediate
digipeating response from it, and later see your position on the map on
the website, after a successful dump at our GS from the satellite.
If you try to contact it and encounter any difficulty, please don’t
hesitate to write to us at
4X4HSC@gmail.com
It’s all very fun. We also hope people can share their experiences here.
73, and good luck.

[ANS thanks the Herzliya Science Center team posting on the AMSAT=BB for the
above information]

———————————————————————

UKube-1 CubeSat Completes Mission

UKube-1, the UK Space Agency’s first national spacecraft, has now completed
its nominal mission following over 14 months of operations. Discussion is
underway with AMSAT-UK about the possibility of taking over UKube-1 operations
to continue its educational and outreach activities.

Launched in July 2014, UKube-1 is a technology demonstration mission with a
broad set of objectives aimed at attracting and training future generations of
engineers, encouraging collaboration across sectors and institutions, fast
tracking space technology development and engaging with students.

As a 3 unit CubeSat (30x30x10cm), flying 4 main payloads, with all the key
subsystems of much larger satellites, UKube-1 remains one of the most advanced
CubeSats ever built. Despite some technical challenges in orbit, the mission
has achieved a range of milestones including:

• delivery into the correct planned orbit (around 650km, sun-synchronous)
• successful deployment of solar panels and antenna
• good battery health
• slow spin rate measured
• uplink and downlink capabilities checked, including Large Data Transfer,
downlink at 3 speeds, and redundant communications mode
• all core payloads commissioned and data collected for each
• on-board camera technology successfully tested
• data downlinked from multiple ground stations across the globe

UKube-1 has also helped maintain the UK’s leading position in the CubeSat
sector. Participation in the mission placed Clyde Space in an excellent
position to capitalize on the fast growing global nanosatellite market. The
company has experienced 100% year on year growth, both in turnover and
employees, as a direct result from involvement in UKube-1, and is firmly
established as a global leader.

Mark McCrum, Bright Ascension Ltd, said:
“UKube-1 provided us with an invaluable opportunity to gain flight heritage
for our software technology and to get deeply involved in the operation of a
complex CubeSat mission. It gave a huge boost to our credibility as a space
software provider and has been instrumental in winning further work.”

Craig Clark, CEO Clyde Space Ltd, said:
“UKube-1 represents a pivotal achievement in the development and growth of
Clyde Space. The project moved the company from being a spacecraft subsystems
supplier to providing full missions for our customers. To give some context to
the extent that Ukube-1 has had to our business, Clyde Space has more than
quadrupled in size in the last 3 years and there are currently over 60 CubeSats
planned through production here in Glasgow over the next 18 months. The retur