Two projects with AMSAT ties selected for NASA launches

Two cubesat missions with ties to AMSAT have been selected as part of the eighth round of the NASA CubeSat Launch Initiative. These spacecraft are eligible for placement on a launch manifest after final negotiations, depending on the availability of a flight opportunity.

TJREVERB is a cubesat from Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology, in Alexandria, Virginia. This satellite will include an AMSAT Fox mode U/v FM radio system, and will be capable of serving as an analog FM repeater.

HuskySat-1 from the University of Washington in Seattle will carry a mode V/u linear transponder and 1200 baud BPSK beacon similar to RadFXsat-2. The satellite will demonstrate plasma propulsion and high gain telemetry in advance of a larger cubesat lunar mission.

The complete list of satellites selected may be found at on the NASA web page. Further information will be shared when available.

RadFXsat-2 receives IARU frequency coordination

RadFXSat-2 is a 1U cubesat technology demonstration mission from Vanderbilt University that has been accepted for launch as part of NASA’s CubeSat Launch Initiative. Vanderbilt University is partnered with AMSAT, who will provide the satellite and communications for the experiments onboard as part of the AMSAT Fox program.

AMSAT recently received IARU frequency coordination for a 1200 baud BPSK telemetry downlink beacon on 435.750 MHz, and a mode V/u inverting transponder with an uplink of 145.860-145.890 MHz and a downlink of 435.760-435.790 MHz.

RadFXSat-2 is currently manifested as part of the ELaNA XX mission, scheduled for no earlier than December 2017, on a Virgin Galactic Launcher One, from Mojave, California. Other satellites on the mission include:

  • CACTUS-1 – Capitol Technology University, Laurel, Md.
  • ALBus – NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio
  • SurfSat – University of Central Florida, Orlando, Fla.
  • Q-PACE – University of Central Florida, Orlando, Fla.
  • CAPE-3 – University of Louisiana Lafayette, La.
  • MiTEE – University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich.
  • PICS – Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah
  • INCA – New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, N.M.
  • MicroMas-2b – Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Lexington, Mass.
  • EXOCUBE – California Polytechnic University, San Louis Obispo, Calif.
  • PolarCube – University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, Colo.

AO-7 eclipses return, satellite now primarily in Mode U/v

From AMSAT-bb (http://amsat.org/pipermail/amsat-bb/2016-November/061297.html):

The AMSAT satellite status page at http://www.amsat.org/status/ indicates
that as of the morning of 11/25/2016, AO-7 is once again entering eclipse
each orbit. This means that the 24 Hour mode change timer is interrupted
each orbit, and the satellite will be found primarily in Mode U/v (aka Mode
B).

As the satellite is powered solely by the now 42 year-old solar panels, it
is very sensitive to strong uplink signals, particularly CW. Users should
closely monitor their downlink for excessive chirp, warbling or “FM’ing” and
reduce power as necessary. More information including frequencies can be
found at http://ww2.amsat.org/?page_id=1031

73, Drew KO4MA

AMSAT VP Operations

 

LUSEX-OSCAR 87 (LO-87)

The Argentinian earth observation satellite ÑuSat-1 carries a linear transponder built by AMSAT Argentina. The satellite was launched on a CZ-4B rocket from Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center in China on May 30, 2016 into a 500 km sun-synchronous orbit with an inclination of 97.5 degrees and a Local Time of the Descending Node (LTDN) of 10:30.

The AMSAT Argentina U/v inverting transponder, named LUSEX, has an uplink of 435.935 MHz to 435.965 MHz and a downlink of 145.935 MHz to 145.965 MHz. Total power output is 250 mW. There is also a CW beacon at 145.900 MHz with a power output of 70 mW.

The transponder and beacon are currently active over Latin America and Europe.

For more information, see the AMSAT Argentina LUSEX page at http://lusex.org.ar/